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Wits researchers unravel the mystery of non-cotectic magmatic rocks
Research shows that an excess amount of some minerals contained in non-cotetic rocks may originate in the feeder conduits along which the magmas are travelling from the deep-seated staging chambers towards Earth's surface. (2020-04-02)
Sediments may control location, magnitude of megaquakes
The world's most powerful earthquakes strike at subduction zones, areas where enormous amounts of stress build up as one tectonic plate dives beneath another. (2020-03-31)
Tree rings could pin down Thera volcano eruption date
Research led by the University of Arizona Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research has anchored a long sequence of tree rings, providing context for the civilizations that existed throughout the Bronze and Iron Ages, including the eruption of Thera. (2020-03-30)
In Earth's largest extinction, land animal die-offs began long before marine extinction
Because of poor dates for land fossils laid down before and after the mass extinction at the end of the Permian, paleontologists assumed that the terrestrial extinctions from Gondwana occurred at the same time as the better-documented marine extinctions. (2020-03-27)
Coral tells own tale about El Niño's past
Rice University and Georgia Tech scientists use data from ancient coral to build a record of temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last millennium. (2020-03-26)
Scientists get first look at cause of 'slow motion' earthquakes
An international team of scientists has for the first time identified the conditions deep below the Earth's surface that lead to the triggering of so-called 'slow motion' earthquakes. (2020-03-25)
Fine-tuning radiocarbon dating could 'rewrite' ancient events
A new paper led by Cornell University points out the need for an important new refinement to the technique. (2020-03-18)
A nuclear conflict anywhere on Earth would cause global crop crisis, study finds
Inflamed tensions between India and Pakistan over the Kashmir region have raised concerns about the potential for a limited nuclear war between the two countries. (2020-03-16)
Limited nuclear war could have big impact on world food supplies
A war between India and Pakistan using less than 1% of nuclear weapons worldwide could lead to the worst global food losses in modern history, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that is the first of its kind. (2020-03-16)
Why organisms shrink
Everyone is talking about global warming. A team of paleontologists at GeoZentrum Nordbayern at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has recently investigated how prehistoric organisms reacted to climate change, basing their research on belemnites. (2020-03-09)
Stone-age 'likes': Study establishes eggshell beads exchanged over 30,000 years
A clump of grass grows on an outcrop of shale 33,000 years ago. (2020-03-09)
Turbulent times revealed on Asteroid 4 Vesta
Planetary scientists at Curtin University have shed some light on the tumultuous early days of the largely preserved protoplanet Asteroid 4 Vesta, the second largest asteroid in our solar system. (2020-02-26)
Human Populations survived the Toba volcanic super-eruption 74,000 years ago
In a study published in Nature Communications, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History's Department of Archaeology, together with international partners, present evidence that Middle Palaeolithic tool-users were present in India before and after the Toba super-eruption 74,000 years ago. (2020-02-25)
Stanford research maps a faster, easier way to build diamond
With the right amount of pressure and surprisingly little heat, a substance found in fossil fuels can transform into pure diamond. (2020-02-25)
Huge stores of Arctic sea ice likely contributed to past climate cooling
In a new paper, climate scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution propose that massive amounts of melting sea ice in the Arctic drained into the North Atlantic and disrupted climate-steering currents, thus playing an important role in causing past abrupt climate change after the last Ice Age, from about 8,000 to 13,000 years ago. (2020-02-20)
South American volcano showing early warning signs of 'potential collapse', research shows
One of South America's most prominent volcanoes is producing early warning signals of a potential collapse, new research has shown. (2020-02-18)
Do the climate effects of air pollution impact the global economy?
Aerosol emissions from burning coal and wood are dangerous to human health, but it turns out that by cooling the Earth they also diminish global economic inequality, according to a new study by Carnegie's Yixuan Zheng, Geeta Persad, and Ken Caldeira, along with UC Irvine's Steven Davis. (2020-02-17)
Oral traditions and volcanic eruptions in Australia
In Australia, the onset of human occupation (about 65,000 years?) and dispersion across the continent are the subjects of intense debate and are critical to understanding global human migration routes. (2020-02-10)
There's a twist in the story of volcanism & mass extinctions, say CCNY researchers
An emerging scientific consensus is that gases -- in particular carbon gases -- released by volcanic eruptions millions of years ago contributed to some of Earth's greatest mass extinctions. (2020-02-10)
First-of-its-kind study examines toll of nuclear war on world's oceans
A new study reveals a previously unknown cost of nuclear war -- shifts in ocean chemistry that could have serious consequences for the world's coral reefs and other marine life. (2020-02-05)
Pre-eruption seismograms recovered for 1980 Mount St. Helens event
Nearly 40 years ago, analog data tapes faithfully recorded intense seismic activity in the two months before the historic eruption of Mount St. (2020-01-30)
Mapping the path of climate change
Predicting a major transition, such as climate change, is extremely difficult, but the probabilistic framework developed by the authors is the first step in identifying the path between a shift in two environmental states. (2020-01-22)
Arctic sea ice can't 'bounce back'
Arctic sea ice cannot 'quickly bounce back' if climate change causes it to melt, new research suggests. (2020-01-21)
Asteroid impact killed dinosaurs while volcanism shaped life in the aftermath
Researchers who analyzed well-preserved ocean drilling and global temperature records have added support to the idea that the primary cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) mass extinction was an asteroid impact, rather than extreme volcanism. (2020-01-16)
In death of dinosaurs, it was all about the asteroid -- not volcanoes
Volcanic activity did not play a direct role in the mass extinction event that killed the dinosaurs, according to an international, Yale-led team of researchers. (2020-01-16)
'Soil photosynthesis' helps to mitigate environmental pollution
An UCO research group has discovered that the effect from solar radiation produces an exchange of nitrogen gases in soil that allows for sequestering harmful gases and turning them into nitrate. (2020-01-15)
Beach-combing Neanderthals dove for shells
A new study suggests that Neanderthals in what is today Italy may have dived into the Mediterranean Sea to collect clam shells. (2020-01-15)
No need to dig too deep to find gold!
Why are some porphyry deposits rich in copper while others contain gold? (2020-01-14)
From smoke going round the world to aerosol levels, NASA observes Australia's bushfires
NASA scientists using data from its NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite, has traced the movement of the smoke coming off the Australian fires across the globe showing that it has circumnavigated the Earth. (2020-01-14)
Scientists use ancient marine fossils to unravel long-standing climate puzzle
Cardiff University scientists have shed new light on the Earth's climate behavior during the last known period of global warming over 14 million years ago. (2020-01-09)
Early humans arrived in Southeast Asia later than previously believed
New dates from the World Heritage archeological site at Sangiran on the island of Java suggest that that the first appearance of Homo erectus occurred more recently than previously thought, researchers report. (2020-01-09)
In ancient scottish tree rings, a cautionary tale on climate, politics and survival
Using old tree rings and archival documents, historians and climate scientists have detailed an extreme cold period in Scotland in the 1690s that caused immense suffering. (2019-12-17)
NASA's SDO sees new kind of magnetic explosion on sun
NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory has observed a new type of magnetic explosion, the likes of which have never seen before. (2019-12-17)
Fossil shells reveal both global mercury contamination and warming when dinosaurs perished
The impact of an asteroid or comet is acknowledged as the principal cause of the mass extinction that killed off most dinosaurs and about three-quarters of the planet's plant and animal species 66 million years ago. (2019-12-16)
NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite views New South Wales fires raging on
NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over the New South Wales fires in Australia on December 16, 2019 and found devastation from the ongoing fires. (2019-12-16)
Earth was stressed before dinosaur extinction
By measuring the chemistry of fossilized seashells collected in Antarctica, researchers discovered that Earth was already experiencing carbon cycle instability before the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. (2019-12-11)
Volcano F is the origin of the floating stones
Since August a large accumulation of pumice has been drifting in the Southwest Pacific towards Australia. (2019-12-09)
Explaining the tiger stripes of enceladus
Slashed across the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus are four straight, parallel fissures or 'tiger stripes' from which water erupts. (2019-12-09)
Corals survive to tell the tale of Earth's newest island eruption
Coral reefs on a tiny island in the South Pacific have shown incredible resilience and recovery from a recent but very severe disturbance: a volcanic eruption that created a new island. (2019-12-08)
Breathing? Thank volcanoes, tectonics and bacteria
A Rice University study in Nature Geoscience suggests Earth's first burst of oxygen was added by a spate of volcanic eruptions brought about by tectonics. (2019-12-02)
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