Current Voting News and Events

Current Voting News and Events, Voting News Articles.
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Making the best decision: Math shows diverse thinkers equal better results
A Florida State University researcher found that networks that consisted of both impulsive and deliberate individuals made, on average, quicker and better decisions than a group with homogenous thinkers. (2020-11-16)

Explaining the religious vote for Trump
New research by Louisiana State University sociologists indicate it wasn't Christian nationalism that drove churchgoers' Trump vote in 2016. Rather, surprisingly, Christian nationalism was important among non-churchgoers. (2020-11-10)

Outcome of 2016 US election associated with poorer mental health in Clinton voters
There were 54.6 million more days of poor mental health among adults in states that voted for Hillary Clinton in December 2016, compared to October 2016, according to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. No such increase in poor mental health following the 2016 US election was observed in states that voted for Donald Trump. The increase in average number of poor mental health days per person in Clinton-voting states largely persisted in the six months after the election. (2020-11-02)

Experts see substantial danger to democratic stability around 2020 election
The latest Bright Line Watch survey finds substantial risks to the legitimacy of the election, including potential problems in the casting and counting of votes, the Electoral College, and in the resolution of electoral disputes. (2020-10-30)

How Twitter takes votes away from Trump but not from Republicans
In the 2016 US presidential election, Twitter made independent voters less likely to vote for Donald Trump, finds new study from Bocconi University and Princeton (2020-10-29)

New Texas poll: Trump and Biden in close race
President Donald Trump is about even with former Vice President Joe Biden in a close contest for Texas' 38 electoral votes in a new swing state poll of Texas likely voters released today. (2020-10-29)

Disease-transmission model forecasts election outcomes
To simulate how interactions between voters may play a role in the upcoming presidential, gubernatorial and senatorial elections, a Northwestern University research team is adapting a model that is commonly used to study infectious diseases. (2020-10-29)

How hard is it to vote in your state?
A new analysis identifies U.S. states that make it easiest, and those that make it more challenging, to register and vote. (2020-10-28)

From sea to shining sea: new survey reveals state-level opinions on climate change
A new report analyzing state-level opinions on climate change finds the majority of Americans believe in and want action on climate change--but factors like state politics and local climate play important roles. (2020-10-26)

Time is not on their side: physicians face barriers to voting
Two new UT Southwestern studies published today report some surprising findings: Only half of practicing physicians are registered to vote, and the most common obstacle faced by resident physicians is the lack of time to vote. The researchers say finding ways to increase voter participation among doctors is critical as the nation tackles health care issues. (2020-10-22)

Voters unlikely to blame politicians for their handling of the pandemic at next election
Politicians are unlikely to be punished or rewarded for their failures or successes in managing the coronavirus pandemic at the next election, suggests an analysis of survey data from the US, the UK and India, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Relative restrictiveness of each state's voting environment in 2020
Texas has the most restrictive electoral environment in 2020, and Oregon has the least restrictive voting practices of the 50 states. This is based on a study of the relative ''cost of voting'' in each of the 50 states (2020-10-19)

Divisive dialogue: Why do we engage in virtual political talk?
UNLV social media expert Natalie Pennington explores the impact of politics and partisanship on online friendships. (2020-10-14)

"Liking" an article online may mean less time spent reading it
When people have the option to click ''like'' on a media article they encounter online, they spend less time actually reading the text, a new study suggests. In a lab experiment, researchers found that people spent about 7 percent less time reading articles on controversial topics when they had the opportunity to upvote or downvote them than if there was no interactive element. (2020-09-30)

New NC poll: Biden and Trump tied
President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden are deadlocked in the race for North Carolina's 15 electoral votes, according to a new poll released today. (2020-09-29)

Higher narcissism may be linked with more political participation
A politically engaged electorate is key to any thriving democracy, but not everyone participates in elections and other political activities. New Penn State research found that people who are narcissistic may also be more politically active. (2020-09-25)

COVID-19 shapes political approval ratings
During the early days of the pandemic, COVID-19 created a rally effect around political leaders, according to a large-scale study published Sept. 24, 2020. The rise of COVID-19 cases was associated with a 15- to 20-point boost in approval for United States governors and an average 14-point gain for world leaders. It's unclear how long the effect lasts, but the health crisis might be a catalyst to help incumbent governments win re-election. (2020-09-24)

Taking in refugees does not strongly influence xenophobia in East German communities
The reception of refugees in East German communities did not lead to changes in voting behaviour or attitudes to migration. This is the main finding of a study conducted by Max Schaub (WZB), Johanna Gereke (MZES), and Delia Baldassarri (New York University). In the over 200 East German communities they examined, negative attitudes to migration were widespread. However, the arrival of refugees in the immediate neighbourhood had hardly any influence on these attitudes. (2020-09-22)

COVID opens a partisan gap on voting by mail
Study by UC's New Electorate Project documents a growing divide on preferences for absentee ballots. Before the pandemic, there wasn't any difference in the rates at which Democratic and Republican voters actually cast their ballots by mail or in-person. That may change now. (2020-09-22)

For diverse corporate board members, upward mobility stops with a seat at the table
A new study from the University of Delaware found that even when corporate boards include directors who are women and/or racial minorities, these diverse directors are significantly less likely to serve in positions of leadership. This occurs even when the directors possess stronger qualifications. (2020-09-11)

Feeling misunderstood boosts support for Brexit
Feeling misunderstood by other groups makes people more likely to support separatist causes like Brexit and Scottish independence, new research suggests. (2020-09-09)

Paper ballots, risk-limiting audits can help defend elections and democracy, study finds
With just over two months before the 2020 election, three professors at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business offer a comprehensive review of how other nations are seeking to protect their democratic institutions and presents how a multifaceted, targeted approach is needed to achieve that goal in the U.S., where intelligence officials have warned that Russia and other rivals are again attempting to undermine our democracy. (2020-09-02)

COVID-19 and the threat to American voting rights
The COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated three main pathologies of American voting rights. The pandemic has revealed the lack of systematic and uniform protection of voting rights in the United States. (2020-09-02)

Survey finds election concerns vary by race, education levels, party affiliation
The coronavirus pandemic is creating concerns about the safety of the 2020 elections, with some people also questioning the integrity of the safety precautions being taken. A new survey finds that while most voters believe that voting will be safe and that their ballot will be counted despite the pandemic, those who question election safety and some who question election integrity appear less likely to vote. (2020-08-27)

Mandatory vote-by-mail modestly increases voter turnout without giving either party an edge in elections, study suggests
Mandatory vote-by-mail modestly increases voter turnout without advantaging one party over the other, according to a causal inference analysis of 30 years of nationwide US county-level data and more than 40 million individual-level voter records from the states of Washington and Utah. The results support that this alternative to in-person voting - which has recently (2020-08-26)

US political parties become extremist to get more votes
New mathematical modeling shows that US political parties are becoming increasingly polarized due to their quest for voters -- not because voters themselves are becoming more extremist. (2020-08-26)

Climate Insights 2020: Climate opinions unchanged by pandemic, but increasingly entrenched
A new survey provides a snapshot of American opinion on climate change as the nation's public health, economy, and social identity are put to the test. (2020-08-24)

Restaurant customers frown on automatic gratuities, particularly after good service
Automatic gratuities leave restaurant patrons with a bad taste, even when the meal and the service were excellent, new research from Washington State University indicates. (2020-08-10)

The brains of nonpartisans are different from those who register to vote with a party
The brains of people with no political allegiance are different from those who strongly support one party, major new research shows. (2020-08-10)

Study: Americans prize party loyalty over democratic principles
It is conventional wisdom that Americans cherish democracy -- but a new study by Yale political scientists reports that only a small fraction of U.S. voters are willing to sacrifice their partisan and policy interests to defend democratic principles. (2020-08-10)

New model shows how voting behavior can drive political parties apart
If voters gravitate toward the center of the political spectrum, why are the parties drifting farther apart? A new model reveals a mechanism for increased polarization in US politics, guided by the idea of 'satisficing'-- that people will settle for a candidate who is 'good enough.' (2020-08-10)

Many states lack election flexibility needed to address pandemic safety concerns
The coronavirus pandemic poses unprecedented safety challenges to the nation's elections and significantly disrupted elections held this spring. A new study finds that many states continue to lack the policies and preparations needed to address safety concerns of holding elections in November. The analysis also concludes that all the options available to improve safety during the 2020 election have a low risk of threatening the integrity of balloting. (2020-08-05)

Correlations identified between insurance coverage and states' voting patterns
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University reviewed national data from the U.S. Census Bureau and found associations between states' voting patterns in the 2016 presidential elections and decreases in the number of adults 18 to 64 years of age without health insurance coverage. (2020-07-14)

Voter ID laws discriminate against racial and ethnic minorities, new study reveals
Voter ID laws are becoming more common and more strict, and the stakes for American democracy are high and growing higher by the year. New research from the University of California San Diego provides evidence that voter ID laws disproportionately reduce voter turnout in more racially diverse areas. (2020-06-24)

Candidates who use humor on Twitter may find the joke is on them
Political candidates' use of humor on social media could sometimes backfire on them with potential supporters, new research suggests. People were more likely to view messages using humor as inappropriate for a political candidate they didn't know, the study found. That led participants to rate a candidate using humor as less credible than one who didn't -- and less likely to get their vote. (2020-06-15)

We can't (and shouldn't) expect clinicians without PPE to treat COVID-19 patients
We can't, and shouldn't, expect healthcare professionals without adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) to risk their lives to care for patients with COVID-19 infection, contends an expert in a stinging rebuke, published in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2020-05-21)

Latest 'Youth COVID-19' study shows young people worried for their future
Latest 'Youth Covid-19' study shows young people worried for their future prospects in the 'new normal'. Young people are also turning to traditional media outlets -- many for the first time -- and rejecting fake news on social channels (2020-05-18)

Eurovision voting points to more than just musical tastes
Although this year's Eurovision Song Contest has been postponed due to the COVID-19 outbreak, academics from the University of Stirling and University of Glasgow have revealed interesting patterns from previous years' public votes. Dr. Isaac Tabner, from Stirling Management School, and Dr. Antonios Siganos, from the Adam Smith Business School, have looked at how each country's votes for its favorite song can give an indication of the likelihood and nature of business exchanges across borders. (2020-05-11)

Experts issue guide on lung cancer screening, management during COVID-19
A new expert panel consensus statement published simultaneously today in the journals Radiology: Imaging Cancer, Chest and the Journal of the American College of Radiology provides guidance to clinicians managing lung cancer screening programs and patients with lung nodules during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-04-23)

New research shows children and teens worry about political issues
A new psychological study suggests that children and teens are worried about political issues, though it's unclear that children's and teens' worry is a cause for concern, or that it is interfering with their mental health functioning. (2020-03-10)

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