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Current Wastewater News and Events

Current Wastewater News and Events, Wastewater News Articles.
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Fracking chemical may interfere with male sex hormone receptor
A chemical used in hydraulic fracturing, commonly called fracking, has the potential to interfere with reproductive hormones in men, according to research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-31)
HKU team develops new wastewater treatment process
A University of Hong Kong research team has developed a novel wastewater treatment system that can effectively remove conventional pollutants, and recover valuable resources such as phosphorus and organic materials. (2020-03-30)
Wastewater test could provide early warning of COVID-19
Researchers at Cranfield University are working on a new test to detect SARS-CoV-2 in the wastewater of communities infected with the virus. (2020-03-30)
Pharma's potential impact on water quality
When people take medications, these drugs and their metabolites can be excreted and make their way to wastewater treatment plants. (2020-03-25)
Microplastic fibers linked to respiratory, reproductive changes in fish
Chronic exposure to microplastic fibers causes aneurysms, erosion of surface layers and other serious damage to fish gills, and increases egg production in female fish, a sign that chemicals in the fibers may be acting as endocrine disruptors, a new study by researchers at Duke University and China's Zhejiang University of Technology finds. (2020-03-16)
Treated wastewater may safe for aquaculture -- Ben-Gurion University researchers
A new study in aquaculture by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev has determined that organic micropollutants (OMPs) in the water - trace elements of heavy metals, pharmaceuticals and personal care products as well as pesticides, solvents, and detergents - result in minimal accumulation in fish. (2020-03-13)
Invisible plastics in water
A Washington State University research team has found that nanoscale particles of the most commonly used plastics tend to move through the water supply, especially in fresh water, or settle out in wastewater treatment plants, where they end up as sludge, in landfills, and often as fertilizer. (2020-03-13)
Submersible sensors rapidly detect bacterial pollution in water
Environmental engineers from San Diego State University tested sensors that can very quickly detect bacteria in the water, with the potential to relay data immediately to decision makers. (2020-03-11)
New nano strategy fights superbugs
Rice University researchers imprint carbon nitride nanosheets to catch and kill free-floating antibiotic resistant genes found in secondary effluent produced by wastewater treatment plants. (2020-03-11)
Paper: Disposal of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing poses dangers to drivers
A new paper co-written by Yilan Xu, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shows that the growing traffic burden in shale energy boomtowns from trucks hauling wastewater to disposal sites resulted in a surge of road fatalities and severe accidents. (2020-03-02)
Is there a technological solution to aquatic dead zones?
Could pumping oxygen-rich surface water into the depths of lakes, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters help ameliorate dangerous dead zones? (2020-03-02)
Movement of a liquid droplet generates over 5 volts of electricity
Scientists have developed an energy harvesting device that generates over 5 volts of electricity from a liquid droplet. (2020-02-13)
Researchers: Synthetic chemicals in soils are 'ticking time bomb'
Synthetic chemicals that were released into the environment for the first time 80 years ago have been linked to harmful health effects, and more of them are migrating slowly from the soil, according to University of Arizona research. (2020-02-11)
Who will lead the global surveillance of antimicrobial resistance via sewage?
In the journal Science, a DTU professor calls for someone to carry on a global surveillance of antimicrobial resistance and infectious diseases via sewage. (2020-02-10)
At least 13% of wastewater treated by Southern Ontario septic systems ends up in streams
The presence of artificial sweeteners has revealed that at least 13 percent of septic system wastewater from rural Southern Ontario homes eventually makes its way into local streams. (2020-02-06)
Treating wastewater with ozone could convert pharmaceuticals into toxic compounds
With water scarcity intensifying, wastewater treatment and reuse are gaining popularity. (2020-02-05)
Flushing nitrogen from seawater-based toilets
With about half the world's population living close to the coast, using seawater to flush toilets could be possible with a salt-tolerant bacterium. (2020-02-03)
Vast amounts of valuable energy, nutrients, water lost in world's fast-rising wastewater streams
Vast amounts of valuable energy, agricultural nutrients, and water could potentially be recovered from the world's fast-rising volume of municipal wastewater, a new UN study says. (2020-02-03)
Urine fertilizer: 'Aging' effectively protects against transfer of antibiotic resistance
Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan. (2020-01-22)
Toward a smarter way of recharging the aquifer
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis have solved a mystery: how did arsenic show up in aquifer water that had been triple purified? (2020-01-09)
Polluted wastewater in the forecast? Try a solar umbrella
Evaporation ponds, commonly used in many industries to manage wastewater, can occupy a large footprint and often pose risks to birds and other wildlife, yet they're an economical way to deal with contaminated water. (2020-01-06)
Development of ultrathin durable membrane for efficient oil and water separation
Researchers led by Professor MATSUYAMA Hideto and Professor YOSHIOKA Tomohisa at Kobe University's Research Center for Membrane and Film Technology have succeeded in developing an ultrathin membrane with a fouling-resistant silica surface treatment for high performance separation of oil from water. (2019-12-26)
Oil-catching sponge could soak up residue from offshore drilling
An oil-catching sponge, developed at the University of Toronto and Imperial, could help thwart water contamination from offshore oil drilling. (2019-12-16)
Study calls for improved sanitation and the environmental management of pharmaceuticals
Failure to ensure the environmental sustainability of growing patient access to medicines in developing economies could increase the risk of adverse environmental impacts, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth. (2019-12-03)
Wastewater leak in West Texas revealed
Geophysicists at SMU say that evidence of leak occurring in a West Texas wastewater disposal well between 2007 and 2011 should raise concerns about the current potential for contaminated groundwater and damage to surrounding infrastructure. (2019-11-25)
Get over it? When it comes to recycled water, consumers won't
If people are educated on recycled water, they may come to agree it's perfectly safe and tastes as good -- or better -- than their drinking water. (2019-11-18)
Rubber in the environment
The tread on the tyre is worn out, new tyres are needed. (2019-11-14)
Turning (more) fat and sewage into natural gas
NC State University researchers have developed what is, to date, the most efficient means of converting sewage sludge and restaurant grease into natural gas. (2019-11-13)
Microplastics found in oysters, clams on Oregon coast, PSU study finds
Tiny threads of plastics are showing up in Pacific oysters and razor clams along the Oregon coast -- and the yoga pants, fleece jackets, and sweat-wicking clothing that Pacific Northwesterners love to wear are a source of that pollution, according to a new Portland State University study. (2019-11-12)
Wildlife in Catalonia carry bacteria resistant to antimicrobials used in human health
A study performed in Catalonia by IRTA-CReSA, UAB and Torreferrussa Wildlife Center demonstrates that the enteric bacteria of wildlife origin in Catalonia exhibits a high prevalence and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes. (2019-11-12)
Reassessing strategies to reduce phosphorus levels in the Detroit river watershed
In an effort to control the cyanobacteria blooms and dead zones that plague Lake Erie each summer, fueled by excess nutrients, the United States and Canada in 2016 called for a 40% reduction in the amount of phosphorus entering the lake's western and central basins, including the Detroit River's contribution. (2019-11-06)
University of Oklahoma geoscientist hopes to make induced earthquakes predictable
University of Oklahoma Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy assistant professor Xiaowei Chen and a group of geoscientists from Arizona State University and the University of California, Berkeley, have created a model to forecast induced earthquake activity from the disposal of wastewater after oil and gas production. (2019-11-06)
Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems
A new Colorado State University study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. (2019-10-31)
Microrobots clean up radioactive waste (video)
According to some experts, nuclear power holds great promise for meeting the world's growing energy demands without generating greenhouse gases. (2019-10-30)
Mapping international drug use through the world's largest wastewater study
A seven-year project monitoring illicit drug use in 37 countries via wastewater samples shows that cocaine use was skyrocketing in Europe in 2017 and Australia had a serious problem with methamphetamine. (2019-10-23)
Mapping international drug use by looking at wastewater
Wastewater-based epidemiology is a rapidly developing scientific discipline with the potential for monitoring close to real-time, population-level trends in illicit drug use. (2019-10-23)
Researchers find antibiotic resistant genes prevalent in groundwater
The spread of antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) through the water system could put public safety at-risk. (2019-10-04)
Major environmental challenge as microplastics are harming our drinking water
Plastics in our waste streams are breaking down into tiny particles, causing potentially catastrophic consequences for human health and our aquatic systems, finds research from the University of Surrey and Deakin's Institute for Frontier Materials. (2019-09-09)
Cheap water treatment
There's nothing new in treating water by sorption of organic solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE). (2019-09-09)
Plant research could benefit wastewater treatment, biofuels and antibiotics
Chinese and Rutgers scientists have discovered how aquatic plants cope with water pollution, a major ecological question that could help boost their use in wastewater treatment, biofuels, antibiotics and other applications. (2019-09-05)
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