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Current Water management News and Events

Current Water management News and Events, Water management News Articles.
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It takes two -- a two-atom catalyst, that is -- to make oxygen from water
The search for sustainable approaches to generating new fuels has brought scientists back to one of the most abundant materials on Earth -- reddish iron oxide in the form of hematite, also known as rust. (2019-10-21)
Land management practices to reduce nitrogen load may be affected by climate changes
Nitrogen from agricultural production is a major cause of pollution in the Mississippi River Basin and contributes to large dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico. (2019-10-18)
Breaking water molecules apart to generate clean fuel: Investigating a promising material
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) investigated a material that uses sunlight for splitting water molecules (H2O) to obtain dihydrogen (H2). (2019-10-17)
Family members' emotional attachment limits family firm growth
New research led by Lancaster University Management School's Centre for Family Business shows family-related considerations often trump a desire to grow and expand in family firms. (2019-10-16)
Lakes worldwide are experiencing more severe algal blooms
The intensity of summer algal blooms has increased over the past three decades, according to a first-ever global survey of dozens of large, freshwater lakes, which was conducted by Carnegie's Jeff Ho and Anna Michalak and NASA's Nima Pahlevan. (2019-10-14)
Hydrologic simulation models that inform policy decisions are difficult to interpret
Hydrologic models that simulate and predict water flow are used to estimate how natural systems respond to different scenarios such as changes in climate, land use, and soil management. (2019-10-11)
Has global warming stopped? The tap of incoming energy cannot be turned off
A rapid increase in the global ocean heat content has been detected in observations during the warming slowdown period, at a rate of about 9.8 × 1021 J yr-1. (2019-10-10)
Global model reveals a future without nature's crucial contributions to humanity
A new model that captures nature's contributions to human wellbeing and compares them to peoples' future needs shows that, within the next thirty years, as many five billion people could face water and food insecurity -- particularly in Africa and South Asia. (2019-10-10)
How bats relocate in response to tree loss
Identifying how groups of animals select where to live is important for understanding social dynamics and for management and conservation. (2019-10-09)
How to keep cool in a blackout during a heatwave
If there is no power for air-conditioning, and tap water is the only resource available, spreading it across the skin is the best way to prevent the body overheating irrespective of the climate, according to a new study from the University of Sydney. (2019-10-08)
Computer kidney sheds light on proper hydration
A new computer kidney developed at the University of Waterloo could tell researchers more about the impacts of medicines taken by people who don't drink enough water. (2019-10-07)
Disappearing Peruvian glaciers
It is common knowledge that glaciers are melting in most areas across the globe. (2019-10-07)
Researchers find antibiotic resistant genes prevalent in groundwater
The spread of antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) through the water system could put public safety at-risk. (2019-10-04)
Getting an 'eel' for the water: The physics of undulatory human swimming
A team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba captured the 3D motion of an athlete performing undulatory swimming. (2019-10-03)
Researchers outline policy approaches to transform fire management
A research team led by Colorado State University's Courtney Schultz has outlined governance and policy approaches to better manage wildfires. (2019-10-03)
Managing stormwater and stream restoration projects together
A unified approach may benefit water quality, environment more than piecemeal. (2019-10-02)
New tool provides critical information for addressing the global water crisis
There has been a critical gap in the ability to identify which households experience issues with reliably accessing safe water in sufficient quantities for all household uses, from drinking and cooking to bathing and cleaning -- until now. (2019-09-30)
Child deaths in Africa could be prevented by family planning
Children under 5 years of age in Africa are much more likely to die as a direct result of poor health linked to air pollution, unsafe water, lack of sanitation, increased family size, and environmental degradation, according to the first continent-wide investigation of its kind. (2019-09-30)
Engineers produce water-saving crop irrigation sensor
Developed by the team of UConn engineers -- environmental, mechanical, and chemical -- the sensors expected to save nearly 35% of water consumption and cost far less than what exists. (2019-09-26)
Faster than ever -- neutron tomography detects water uptake by roots
The high-speed neutron tomography developed at HZB generates a complete 3D image every 1.5 seconds and is thus seven times faster than before. (2019-09-25)
Scientists and key figures develop vision for managing UK land and seas after Brexit
A team of researchers, led by scientists at the University of York, consulted with key figures from the agriculture and fishing industries nationwide to produce a framework for managing land and seas after the UK has left the EU. (2019-09-24)
Crappy news for the dung beetle and those who depend on them
You mightn't think that the life of a dung beetle, a creature who eats poop every day of its short life, could get any worse, but you'd be wrong. (2019-09-24)
Quantum destabilization of a water sandwich
When a thin layer of water is squeezed between two hydrophobic surfaces, the laws of classical physics break down. (2019-09-24)
Water may be scarce for new power plants in Asia
Climate change and over-tapped waterways could leave developing parts of Asia without enough water to cool power plants in the near future, new research indicates. (2019-09-20)
Study estimates more than 100,000 cancer cases could stem from contaminants in tap water
A toxic cocktail of chemical pollutants in US drinking water could result in more than 100,000 cancer cases, according to a peer-reviewed study from Environmental Working Group -- the first study to conduct a cumulative assessment of cancer risks due to 22 carcinogenic contaminants found in drinking water nationwide. (2019-09-19)
Smoking abstinence has little impact on the motivation for food
It's sometimes thought that smokers who can't light up are likely to reach for food in lieu of cigarettes. (2019-09-19)
Sesame yields stable in drought conditions
Research shows adding sesame to cotton-sorghum crop rotations is possible in west Texas (2019-09-18)
Winning-at-all-costs in the workplace: Short-term gains could spell long-term disaster
Organizations endorsing a win-at-all-costs environment may find this management style good for the bottom-line, but it could come a price. (2019-09-18)
Study explores how rock expands near soil surface in Southern Sierra Nevada
Weathering of subsurface rock in the Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California occurs due more to rocks expanding than from chemical decomposition. (2019-09-18)
Study shows importance of tailoring treatments to clearly defined weed control objectives
A new study in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management shows that working smarter, not harder, can lead to better control of invasive weeds. (2019-09-16)
New study shows common carp aquaculture in Neolithic China dating back 8,000 years
In a recent study, an international team of researchers analyzed fish bones excavated from the Early Neolithic Jiahu site in Henan Province, China. (2019-09-16)
Are existing laws enough to cope with accelerating environmental change?
Do you think that major statutory reform is necessary address global environmental challenges? (2019-09-16)
Four billion particles of microplastics discovered in major body of water
While collecting water samples and plankton, researchers discovered a high concentration of microplastics, which are known to disrupt the marine food chain. (2019-09-12)
'Planting water' is possible -- against aridity and droughts
Together with scientists from the UK and the US, researchers from the Leibniz- Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have developed a mathematical model that can reflect the complex interplays between vegetation, soil and water regimes. (2019-09-11)
Conserving rare species for the maintenance of Mediterranean forests
This study has shown the importance of conserving rare species for the maintenance of complex ecosystems like Mediterranean forests. (2019-09-11)
Water detected on an exoplanet located in its star's habitable zone
An international study lead by UdeM astronomer Björn Benneke has detected water vapor on the planet K2-18b; this represents a major discovery in the search of alien life. (2019-09-11)
NASA's Hubble finds water vapor on habitable-zone exoplanet for 1st time
With data from the Hubble Space Telescope, water vapor has been detected in the atmosphere of a super-Earth with habitable temperatures. (2019-09-11)
Soils could be affected by climate change, impacting water and food
Coasts, oceans, ecosystems, weather and human health all face impacts from climate change, and now valuable soils may also be affected. (2019-09-11)
'Flying fish' robot can propel itself out of water and glide through the air
A bio-inspired bot uses water from the environment to create a gas and launch itself from the water's surface. (2019-09-11)
Climate change: A dirt-y business
Groundwater is essential for growing crops, but new research shows climate change is making it harder for soil to absorb water from rainfall. (2019-09-11)
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