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Current Water molecules News and Events

Current Water molecules News and Events, Water molecules News Articles.
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Water common -- yet scarce -- in exoplanets
The most extensive survey of atmospheric chemical compositions of exoplanets to date has revealed trends that challenge current theories of planet formation and has implications for the search for water in the solar system and beyond. (2019-12-11)
Study: Water births are as safe as land births for mom, baby
A new study found that water births are no more risky than land births, and that women in the water group sustain fewer first and second-degree tears. (2019-12-10)
Navigating navigating land and water
Centipedes not only walk on land but also swim in water. (2019-12-09)
Explaining the tiger stripes of enceladus
Slashed across the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus are four straight, parallel fissures or 'tiger stripes' from which water erupts. (2019-12-09)
Asian water towers are world's most important and most threatened
Scientists from around the world have assessed the planet's 78 mountain glacier-based water systems. (2019-12-09)
Liquid flow is influenced by a quantum effect in water
Researchers at EPFL have discovered that the viscosity of solutions of electrically charged polymers dissolved in water is influenced by a quantum effect. (2019-12-09)
NASA examines Tropical Cyclone Belna's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Belna. (2019-12-09)
Siberian blue lakes and their inhabitants
There are picturesque but poorly studied blue lakes situated in Western Siberia. (2019-12-05)
Water management grows farm profits
A study investigates effects of irrigation management on yield and profit. (2019-12-04)
Properties of graphene change due to water and oxygen
Professor Sunmin Ryu and his research team investigated the oxidation-reduction principle of two-dimensional materials by interfacial diffusion. (2019-12-04)
Water was a winner in capturing CO2
Reducing the level of CO2 in the atmosphere will almost certainly require carbon capture. (2019-12-04)
Studying water quality with satellites and public data
The researchers built a novel dataset of more than 600,000 matchups between water quality field measurements and Landsat imagery, creating a 'symphony of data.' (2019-12-04)
Rural decline not driven by water recovery
New research from the University of Adelaide has shown that climate and economic factors are the main drivers of farmers leaving their properties in the Murray-Darling Basin, not reduced water for irrigation as commonly claimed. (2019-12-04)
How to improve water quality in Europe
Toxic substances from agriculture, industry and households endanger water quality in Europe -- and by extension, ecosystems and human health. (2019-12-03)
New membrane technology to boost water purification and energy storage
Imperial College London scientists have created a new type of membrane that could improve water purification and battery energy storage efforts. (2019-12-02)
The impact of molecular rotation on a peculiar isotope effect on water hydrogen bonds
Quantum nature of hydrogen bonds in water manifests itself in peculiar physicochemical isotope effects: while deuteration often elongates and weakens hydrogen bonds of typical hydrogen-bonded systems composed of bulky constituent molecules, it elongates but strengthens hydrogen bonds of water molecular aggregates. (2019-12-02)
Throwing cold water on ice baths: Avoid this strategy for repairing or building muscle
New research suggests that ice baths aren't helpful for repairing and building muscle over time, because they decrease the generation of protein in muscles. (2019-12-02)
Providing safe, clean water
In many parts of the world, access to clean drinking water is far from certain. (2019-11-29)
The coldest reaction
In temperatures millions of times colder than interstellar space, Harvard researchers have performed the coldest reaction in the known universe. (2019-11-28)
Black silicon can help detect explosives
Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, and Melbourne Center for Nanofabrication developed an ultrasensitive detector based on black silicon. (2019-11-27)
A nice reactive ring to it: New synthetic pathways for diverse aromatic compounds
Researchers at the Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) published a new method for synthesizing γ?aryl-β-ketoesters, which are used in the pharmaceutical manufacturing to create many drug molecules that contain a multi-substituted aromatic framework. (2019-11-27)
Scientists clarify light harvesting in green algae
A new study by Chinese and Japanese researchers has now characterized the light-harvesting system of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a common unicellular green alga. (2019-11-26)
A study compares how water is managed in Spain, California and Australia
Legislative changes in these three regions always come about due to drought crises but they show important differences. (2019-11-25)
A missing link in haze formation
Hazy days don't just block the view; they mean the air contains particulate matter that can compromise human health. (2019-11-25)
Clean air research converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical
A toxic pollutant produced by burning fossil fuels can be captured from the exhaust gas stream and converted into useful industrial chemicals using only water and air thanks to a new advanced material developed by an international team of scientists. (2019-11-22)
Increase in cannabis cultivation or residential development could impact water resources
Cannabis cultivation could have a significant effect on groundwater and surface water resources when combined with residential use, evidence from a new study suggests. (2019-11-22)
New material captures and converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical
A team led by the University of Manchester has developed a metal-organic framework material providing a selective, reversible and repeatable capability to capture a toxic air pollutant, nitrogen dioxide, which is produced by combusting fossil fuels. (2019-11-22)
Illinois researcher's theory of pore-scale transport to enable improved flow batteries
Redox flow batteries are an emerging technology for electrochemical energy storage that could help enhance the use of power produced by renewable energy resources. (2019-11-21)
UT mathematician develops model to control spread of aquatic invasive species
Adjusting the water flow rate in a river can prevent invasive species from moving upstream and expanding their range. (2019-11-21)
The ever-changing brain: Shining a light on synaptic plasticity
Researchers in the Membrane Cooperativity Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) in Japan, in collaboration with researchers from universities across Japan, have found that AMPA receptors form and disintegrate continually, within a fraction of a second, rather than existing as stable entities. (2019-11-20)
Researchers design an improved pathway to carbon-neutral plastics
Researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and Caltech have designed a new and improved system for efficiently converting CO2, water, and renewable energy into ethylene -- the precursor to a wide range of plastic products -- under neutral conditions. (2019-11-20)
Researchers visualize bacteria motor in first step toward human-produced electrical energy
Humans, one day, may be able to produce their own electrical energy in the same way electric eels do, according to a research team based in Japan. (2019-11-20)
Artificial intelligence algorithm can learn the laws of quantum mechanics
Artificial intelligence can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electronic properties of molecules. (2019-11-19)
Trinity scientists engineer 'Venus flytrap' bio-sensors to snare pollutants
The biological sensors change color once they have successfully snared a target molecule, and will soon have a host of important environmental, medical and security applications. (2019-11-19)
Reservoir management could help prevent toxic algal blooms in Great Lakes
Managing reservoirs for water quality, not just flood control, could be part of the solution to the growth of toxic algal blooms in the Great Lakes, especially Lake Erie, every summer. (2019-11-19)
Sierra Nevada has oldest underground water recharge system in Europe
Scientists from the University of Granada, the IGME, and the Universities of Cologne and Lisbon have demonstrated that the careo irrigation channels of Sierra Nevada constitute the oldest underground aquifer recharge system on the continent. (2019-11-18)
New, slippery toilet coating provides cleaner flushing, saves water
In the Wong Laboratory for Nature Inspired Engineering, housed within the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Materials Research Institute, researchers have developed a method that dramatically reduces the amount of water needed to flush a conventional toilet, which usually requires 6 liters. (2019-11-18)
Bees 'surf' atop water
Ever see a bee stuck in a pool? He's surfing to escape. (2019-11-18)
Get over it? When it comes to recycled water, consumers won't
If people are educated on recycled water, they may come to agree it's perfectly safe and tastes as good -- or better -- than their drinking water. (2019-11-18)
The global distribution of freshwater plants is controlled by catchment characteristics
Unlike land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to CO2 to compensate for the low availability of CO2 in water. (2019-11-15)
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