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Current Water quality News and Events

Current Water quality News and Events, Water quality News Articles.
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Sesame yields stable in drought conditions
Research shows adding sesame to cotton-sorghum crop rotations is possible in west Texas (2019-09-18)
'Planting water' is possible -- against aridity and droughts
Together with scientists from the UK and the US, researchers from the Leibniz- Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have developed a mathematical model that can reflect the complex interplays between vegetation, soil and water regimes. (2019-09-11)
Water detected on an exoplanet located in its star's habitable zone
An international study lead by UdeM astronomer Björn Benneke has detected water vapor on the planet K2-18b; this represents a major discovery in the search of alien life. (2019-09-11)
NASA's Hubble finds water vapor on habitable-zone exoplanet for 1st time
With data from the Hubble Space Telescope, water vapor has been detected in the atmosphere of a super-Earth with habitable temperatures. (2019-09-11)
Soils could be affected by climate change, impacting water and food
Coasts, oceans, ecosystems, weather and human health all face impacts from climate change, and now valuable soils may also be affected. (2019-09-11)
'Flying fish' robot can propel itself out of water and glide through the air
A bio-inspired bot uses water from the environment to create a gas and launch itself from the water's surface. (2019-09-11)
Climate change: A dirt-y business
Groundwater is essential for growing crops, but new research shows climate change is making it harder for soil to absorb water from rainfall. (2019-09-11)
Tides don't always flush water out to sea, study shows
In Willapa Bay in Washington state, scientists discovered that water washing over tidal flats during high tides is largely the same water that washed over them during the previous high tide. (2019-09-10)
Major environmental challenge as microplastics are harming our drinking water
Plastics in our waste streams are breaking down into tiny particles, causing potentially catastrophic consequences for human health and our aquatic systems, finds research from the University of Surrey and Deakin's Institute for Frontier Materials. (2019-09-09)
Building water-efficient cities
A University of Arizona-led study shows a community's built environment is closely related to how much water single-family residences use. (2019-09-05)
Source water key to bacterial water safety in remote Northern Australia
In the wet-dry topics of Australia, drinking water in remote communities is often sourced from groundwater bores. (2019-09-05)
Kilauea eruption fosters algae bloom in North Pacific Ocean
USC Dornsife and University of Hawaii researchers get a rare opportunity to study the immediate impact of lava from the Kilauea volcano on the marine environment surrounding the Hawaiian islands. (2019-09-05)
Revolutionizing water quality monitoring for our rivers and reef
New, lower-cost help may soon be on the way to help manage one of the biggest threats facing the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-09-03)
Narrow plasmonic surface lattice resonances prefer asymmetric dielectric environment
A research group led by Dr. LI Guangyuan and Dr. (2019-09-03)
Fetching water increases risk of childhood death
Water fetching is associated with poor health outcomes for women and children, including a higher risk of death. (2019-09-03)
FEFU scientists developed brand-new rapid strength eco-concrete
Engineers of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with colleagues from Kazan State University of Architecture and Engineering (KSUAE) have developed a brand-new rapid strength concrete, applying which there is possible to accelerate the tempo of engineering structures manufacturing by three to four times. (2019-08-30)
A new way to measure how water moves
A new method to measure pore structure and water flow can help scientists more accurately and cheaply determine how fast water, contaminants, nutrients and other liquids move through the soil -- and where they go. (2019-08-29)
2019 Airline Water Study by CUNY's Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center
A 2019 Airline Water Study released today by DietDetective.com and the Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center at the City University of New York reveals that the quality of drinking water varies by airline, and many airlines have possibly provided passengers with unhealthy water. (2019-08-29)
How changes in land use could reduce the browning of lakes
Over the past 50 years, the water in lakes and watercourses has turned increasingly brown. (2019-08-29)
Fresh water found in the Norwegian Sea
The discovery was made at 800 meters below the surface in two small canyons on the continental slope outside Lofoten archipelago. (2019-08-28)
Land-use program fosters white-tailed deer populations in USA
A land-use program piloted in the United States is having a long-term positive impact on populations of white-tailed deer, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-08-27)
Using a smartphone to detect norovirus
University of Arizona researchers have developed a simple, portable and inexpensive way to detect minute amounts of norovirus. (2019-08-27)
Bad Blooms: Researchers review environmental conditions leading to harmful algae blooms
When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animals. (2019-08-26)
Stanford chemists discover water microdroplets spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide
Despite its abundance, water retains a great many secrets. Among them, Stanford chemists have discovered, is that water microdroplets spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide. (2019-08-26)
How plants measure their carbon dioxide uptake
Plants face a dilemma in dry conditions: they have to seal themselves off to prevent losing too much water but this also limits their uptake of carbon dioxide. (2019-08-26)
Speeding up the hydrogen production by the magic topological surface states
The hydrogen economy is considered to be one of the best options for providing renewable energy and, thereby, contributing to mitigating today's environmental challenges. (2019-08-26)
Scientists build a synthetic system to improve wound treatment, drug delivery for soldiers
For the first time, scientists built a synthetic biologic system with compartments like real cells. (2019-08-22)
Materials scientists build a synthetic system with compartments like real cells
Polymer chemists and materials scientists have achieved some notable advances that mimic Nature, but one of the most common and practical features of cells has so far been out of reach -- intracellular compartmentalization. (2019-08-22)
Are we really protecting rivers from pollution? It's hard to say, and that's a problem
More public and private resources than ever are being directed to protecting and preserving aquatic ecosystems and watersheds. (2019-08-22)
Water availability determines carbon uptake under climate warming: study
A research group led by Dr. NIU Shuli from the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that water availability in soil determines the direction of carbon-climate feedback. (2019-08-22)
New evidence highlights growing urban water crisis
New research has found that in 15 major cities in the global south, almost half of all households lack access to piped utility water, affecting more than 50 million people. (2019-08-21)
Smart sink could help save water
An experiment with a water-saving 'smart' faucet shows potential for reducing water use. (2019-08-20)
To make lakes healthy, you first need the right recipe
Pollution of lakes is a worldwide problem. Restoration attempts take a lot of time and effort, and even then they might backfire. (2019-08-20)
Shasta dam releases can be managed to benefit both salmon and sturgeon, study finds
Cold water released from Lake Shasta into the Sacramento River to benefit endangered salmon can be detrimental to young green sturgeon, a threatened species adapted to warmer water. (2019-08-20)
Weather on ancient Mars: Warm with occasional rain, turning cold
A new study of conditions on Mars indicates that the climate 3 to 4 billion years ago was warm enough to provoke substantial rainstorms and flowing water, followed by a longer cold period where the water froze. (2019-08-19)
Paper filter from local algae could save millions of lives in Bangladesh
The problem of access to safe drinking water in most parts of Bangladesh is a persistent challenge. (2019-08-18)
Scientists assess reliability of multiple precipitable water vapor datasets in Central Asia
Scientists evaluated multiple satellite and reanalysis precipitable water vapor (PWV) datasets against radiosonde observations in Central Asia. (2019-08-16)
Fracking has less impact on groundwater than traditional oil and gas production
The amount of water injected for conventional oil and gas production exceeds that from high-volume hydraulic fracturing and other unconventional oil and gas production by more than a factor of 10, according to a new report. (2019-08-15)
Warmer winters are changing the makeup of water in Black Sea
Warmer winters are starting to alter the structure of the Black Sea, which could foreshadow how ocean compositions might shift from future climate change, according to new research. (2019-08-15)
Stronger graphene oxide 'paper' made with weaker units
Jiaxing Huang's counterintuitive discovery will help engineers make stronger materials. (2019-08-15)
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