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Current Water supply News and Events

Current Water supply News and Events, Water supply News Articles.
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Satellite and reanalysis data can substitute field observations over Asian water tower
Satellite data sets are found reliable to reproduce the total column water vapor characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau. (2019-11-12)
New Pitt research finds carbon nanotubes show a love/hate relationship with water
New research in the journal Carbon reveals that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a coating can both repel and hold water in place, a useful property for applications like printing, spectroscopy, water transport, or harvesting surfaces. (2019-11-12)
Half of Piedmont drinking wells may exceed NC's hexavalent chromium standards
A new study which combines measurements from nearly 1,400 drinking water wells across North Carolina estimates that more than half of the wells in the state's Piedmont region contain levels of cancer-causing hexavalent chromium in excess of state safety standards. (2019-11-12)
Using mountains for long-term energy storage
The storage of energy for long periods of time is subject to special challenges. (2019-11-11)
Oxygen deficiency rewires mitochondria
Researchers slow the growth of pancreatic tumor cells. (2019-11-11)
NUS engineers invent smartphone device that detects harmful algae in 15 minutes
A team of engineers from the National University of Singapore has developed a highly sensitive system that uses a smartphone to rapidly detect the presence of toxin-producing algae in water within 15 minutes. (2019-11-07)
Minimizing post-harvest food losses
Research team from Graz, Austria, develops biological methods to improve the shelf life of fruit and vegetables. (2019-11-07)
Why is ice so slippery
The answer lies in a film of water that is generated by friction, one that is far thinner than expected and much more viscous than usual water through its resemblance to the 'snow cones' of crushed ice we drink during the summer. (2019-11-05)
NASA looks at Tropical Cyclone Maha's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Maha. (2019-11-05)
The world is getting wetter, yet water may become less available for North America and Eurasia
With climate change, plants of the future will consume more water than in the present day, leading to less water available for people living in North America and Eurasia, according to a Dartmouth-led study in Nature Geoscience The research suggests a drier future despite anticipated precipitation increases for places like the United States and Europe, populous regions already facing water stresses. (2019-11-04)
Ground penetrating radar reveals why ancient Cambodian capital was moved to Angkor
The largest water management feature in Khmer history was built in the 10th century as part of a short-lived ancient capital in northern Cambodia to store water but the system failed in its first year of operation, possibly leading to the return of the capital to Angkor. (2019-10-31)
Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems
A new Colorado State University study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. (2019-10-31)
Blockchain offers promise for securing global supply chain
Blockchain technology has the potential to transform the global supply chain and improve both the speed and security of handling the flow of goods at international borders. (2019-10-30)
Putting the Water Framework Directive to the test
The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is one of the most progressive regulatory frameworks for water management worldwide. (2019-10-29)
Mathematics reveals new insights into Marangoni flows
In a new study published in EPJ E, Thomas Bickel at the University of Bordeaux has discovered new mathematical laws governing the properties of Marangoni flows. (2019-10-28)
Extinction of cold-water corals on the Namibian shelf due to low oxygen contents
Researchers have only been aware of the existence of fossil cold-water corals off the coast of Namibia since 2016. (2019-10-28)
A new drought-protective small molecule 'drug' for crops
Using a structure-guided approach to small molecule discovery and design, researchers have developed a drought-protective 'drug' for crops, according to a new study. (2019-10-24)
NUS innovation paves the way for sensor interfaces that are 30 times smaller
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have invented a novel class of Digital-to-Analog (DAC) and Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC) that can be entirely designed with a fully-automated digital design methodology. (2019-10-22)
On water sustainability, L.A. County earns C+ from UCLA environmental report card
Los Angeles County's grades are in, and UCLA's latest environmental report card gives the region an overall passing C+ mark for water sustainability. (2019-10-22)
It takes two -- a two-atom catalyst, that is -- to make oxygen from water
The search for sustainable approaches to generating new fuels has brought scientists back to one of the most abundant materials on Earth -- reddish iron oxide in the form of hematite, also known as rust. (2019-10-21)
Preventing cyber security attacks lies in strategic, third-party investments, study finds
Companies interested in protecting themselves and their customers from cyber-attacks need to invest in themselves and the vendors that handle their data, according to new research from American University. (2019-10-21)
Replacing coal with gas or renewables saves billions of gallons of water
The transition from coal to natural gas in the US electricity sector is reducing the industry's water use, Duke University research finds. (2019-10-21)
Breaking water molecules apart to generate clean fuel: Investigating a promising material
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) investigated a material that uses sunlight for splitting water molecules (H2O) to obtain dihydrogen (H2). (2019-10-17)
The Lancet Haematology: First global estimates suggest around 100 million more blood units are needed in countries with low supplies each year
In the first analysis to estimate the gap between global supply and demand of blood, scientists have found that many countries are critically short of blood, according to a modelling study published in The Lancet Haematology journal. (2019-10-17)
Study on climate protection: More forest -- less meat
Forest protects the climate. Reforestation can decisively contribute to mitigating global warming according to the Paris Agreement. (2019-10-15)
Researchers explore spinal discs' early response to injury and ways to improve it
Researchers showed in animal models that the default injury response of spinal discs can be temporarily stopped to allow for better treatment. (2019-10-14)
Lakes worldwide are experiencing more severe algal blooms
The intensity of summer algal blooms has increased over the past three decades, according to a first-ever global survey of dozens of large, freshwater lakes, which was conducted by Carnegie's Jeff Ho and Anna Michalak and NASA's Nima Pahlevan. (2019-10-14)
Hydrologic simulation models that inform policy decisions are difficult to interpret
Hydrologic models that simulate and predict water flow are used to estimate how natural systems respond to different scenarios such as changes in climate, land use, and soil management. (2019-10-11)
Has global warming stopped? The tap of incoming energy cannot be turned off
A rapid increase in the global ocean heat content has been detected in observations during the warming slowdown period, at a rate of about 9.8 × 1021 J yr-1. (2019-10-10)
Global model reveals a future without nature's crucial contributions to humanity
A new model that captures nature's contributions to human wellbeing and compares them to peoples' future needs shows that, within the next thirty years, as many five billion people could face water and food insecurity -- particularly in Africa and South Asia. (2019-10-10)
How to keep cool in a blackout during a heatwave
If there is no power for air-conditioning, and tap water is the only resource available, spreading it across the skin is the best way to prevent the body overheating irrespective of the climate, according to a new study from the University of Sydney. (2019-10-08)
Computer kidney sheds light on proper hydration
A new computer kidney developed at the University of Waterloo could tell researchers more about the impacts of medicines taken by people who don't drink enough water. (2019-10-07)
Disappearing Peruvian glaciers
It is common knowledge that glaciers are melting in most areas across the globe. (2019-10-07)
Researchers find antibiotic resistant genes prevalent in groundwater
The spread of antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) through the water system could put public safety at-risk. (2019-10-04)
Getting an 'eel' for the water: The physics of undulatory human swimming
A team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba captured the 3D motion of an athlete performing undulatory swimming. (2019-10-03)
New tool provides critical information for addressing the global water crisis
There has been a critical gap in the ability to identify which households experience issues with reliably accessing safe water in sufficient quantities for all household uses, from drinking and cooking to bathing and cleaning -- until now. (2019-09-30)
Study examines impact of climate change on Louisiana's Houma tribe
Repeated disasters and environmental changes on Louisiana's Gulf Coast are rapidly eroding the land, and along with it, an Indigenous tribe's ability to sustain its culture, health and livelihoods, new research suggests. (2019-09-27)
Engineers produce water-saving crop irrigation sensor
Developed by the team of UConn engineers -- environmental, mechanical, and chemical -- the sensors expected to save nearly 35% of water consumption and cost far less than what exists. (2019-09-26)
Plastic teabags release microscopic particles into tea
Many people are trying to reduce their plastic use, but some tea manufacturers are moving in the opposite direction: replacing traditional paper teabags with plastic ones. (2019-09-25)
Faster than ever -- neutron tomography detects water uptake by roots
The high-speed neutron tomography developed at HZB generates a complete 3D image every 1.5 seconds and is thus seven times faster than before. (2019-09-25)
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