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Current Wolves News and Events, Wolves News Articles.
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Michigan coyotes: What's for dinner depends on what the neighbors are having
Michigan coyotes in most of the Lower Peninsula are the ''top dogs'' in the local food chain and can dine on a wide variety of small animals, including rabbits and rodents, along with berries and other plant foods, insects, human garbage and even outdoor pet food. (2020-07-20)
Pigs turn to humans as dogs do, unless they have a problem to solve
Researchers compared human-oriented communicative behaviours of young miniature pigs and dogs kept as companion animals. (2020-07-17)
No evidence that predator control will save mountain caribou, study says
Addressing potential threats from predators has not slowed the dramatic decline of mountain caribou in British Columbia and Alberta, according to a new study by scientists from the University of Alberta and two other western Canadian universities. (2020-07-14)
New study warns of misinformation about opt-out organ donation
A new study has warned of the power of a type of behaviour dubbed the 'lone wolf' effect which could result in people 'opting out' of supporting organ donation. (2020-07-10)
Sledge dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'
Sledge dogs are much older and have adapted to Arctic conditions much earlier than previously thought. (2020-06-25)
Positive YouTube videos of wolves linked to greater tolerance
A new study from North Carolina State University suggests that people have more tolerance for wolves after seeing positive videos about them, which could make YouTube an important wolf conservation tool. (2020-06-22)
As rare animals disappear, scientist faces 'ecological grief'
As the wilds around Joanna Lamberts research sites in Africa and North America have vanished, the conservation biologist has struggled to keep hopeful amid the losses. (2020-06-12)
Reintroduction of wolves tied to return of tall willows in Yellowstone National Park
The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of tall willows in the park, according to a new Oregon State University-led study. (2020-05-28)
Saving livestock by thinking like a predator
Humans have struggled to reduce the loss of livestock to carnivores for thousands of years, and yet, solutions remain elusive. (2020-05-14)
Jurassic Park got it wrong: UW Oshkosh research indicates raptors don't hunt in packs
A new University of Wisconsin Oshkosh analysis of raptor teeth published in the peer-reviewed journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology shows that raptorial dinosaurs likely did not hunt in big, coordinated packs like dogs. (2020-05-06)
Logging threatening endangered caribou
University of Guelph researchers found habitat and food web changes from forestry are encouraging more wolf packs to prey on caribou. (2020-04-15)
How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival
While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. (2020-03-30)
Bison in northern Yellowstone proving to be too much of a good thing
Increasing numbers of bison in Yellowstone National Park in recent years have become a barrier to ecosystem recovery in the iconic Lamar Valley in the northern part of the park. (2020-03-30)
'Fatal attraction': Small carnivores drawn to kill sites, then ambushed by larger kin
University of Washington researchers have discovered that large predators play a key yet unexpected role in keeping smaller predators and deer in check. (2020-03-18)
When it comes to conservation, ditch the 'canary in the coal mine'
With habitat loss threatening the extinction of an ever-growing number of species around the world, many wildlife advocates and conservation professionals rely on the proverbial 'canary in the coal mine'--monitoring and protecting a single representative species--to maintain healthy wildlife biodiversity. (2020-02-25)
Threatened birds and mammals have irreplaceable roles in the natural world
A new study led from the University of Southampton has shown that threatened birds and mammals are often ecologically distinct and irreplaceable in their environment. (2020-02-24)
New study results consistent with dog domestication during ice age
Analysis of Paleolithic-era teeth from a 28,500-year-old fossil site in the Czech Republic provides supporting evidence for two groups of canids -- one dog-like and the other wolf-like - with differing diets, which is consistent with the early domestication of dogs. (2020-02-19)
Himalayan wolf discovered to be a unique wolf adapted to harsh high altitude life
Researchers from the University of Oxford have discovered that the Himalayan wolf is a unique wolf characteristically adapted to the harsh life in the Asian high altitudes where low oxygen levels challenge all life forms. (2020-02-19)
Scientists unexpectedly witness wolf puppies play fetch
When it comes to playing a game of fetch, many dogs are naturals. (2020-01-16)
Newly discovered genetic element adjusts coat color in dogs
Why are Irish Setters so red while other breeds can come in different hues? (2020-01-14)
Dogs and wolves are both good at cooperating
A team of researchers have found that dogs and wolves are equally good at cooperating with partners to obtain a reward. (2020-01-06)
Study: yes, even wild tigers struggle with work/life balance
A new study by a team of Russian and American scientists revealed the first-ever detailed analysis of a tigress from the birth of her cubs through their first four months. (2019-12-19)
Bumblebees exposed to Chernobyl-levels of radiation consume more nectar
Researchers at Stirling University have found that exposure to chronic low-dose radiation, found in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, negatively affects bumblebee energy use by increasing their metabolic rate and food consumption. (2019-12-11)
Habitat restoration alone not enough to support threatened caribou: UBC study
New UBC research suggests restoring habitat may not be enough to save threatened woodland caribou--an iconic animal that's a major part of boreal forests in North America and a key part of the culture and economy of many Indigenous peoples in Canada. (2019-11-27)
Unique sledge dogs helped the Inuit thrive in the North American Arctic
A unique group of dogs helped the Inuit conquer the tough terrain of the North American Arctic, major new analysis of the remains of hundreds of animals shows. (2019-11-26)
The benefits that carnivorous animals bring to society are under-studied
For a period of 17 years, the scientific studies conducted around the world on the relationships between humans and carnivores focused excessively on the conflicts between them, overlooking the benefits that carnivores bring to society. (2019-10-24)
Dishing the dirt on an early man cave
Fossil animal droppings, charcoal from ancient fires and bone fragments litter the ground of one of the world's most important human evolution sites, new research reveals. (2019-09-26)
What wolves' teeth reveal about their lives
UCLA biologist discovers what wolves' broken teeth reveal about their lives. (2019-09-24)
Beaver reintroduction key to solving freshwater biodiversity crisis
Reintroducing beavers to their native habitat is an important step towards solving the freshwater biodiversity crisis, according to experts at the University of Stirling. (2019-08-26)
Poo's clues: Moose droppings indicate Isle Royale ecosystem health
Moose are picky eaters, and that's a good thing for their ecosystems. (2019-08-13)
Clemson adds 'vampire elephants,' 'ecological zombies' to human-wildlife conflict debate
New research by Clemson University scientists Shari Rodriguez and Christie Sampson in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, examines the effects non-carnivorous species such as feral hogs and elephants can have on humans and livestock and the potential consequences of excluding these animals from research focused on mitigating wildlife impacts on livestock. (2019-08-12)
A hog in wolf's clothing
Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, and other predators impact livestock even though noncarnivores also threaten livestock. (2019-08-06)
Intense look at La Brea Tar Pits explains why we have coyotes, not saber-toothed cats
The most detailed study to date of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits is helping Americans understand why today we're dealing with coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off. (2019-08-05)
Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators
Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. (2019-08-02)
Gene transcripts from ancient wolf analyzed after 14,000 years in permafrost
RNA -- the short-lived transcripts of genes -- from the 'Tumat puppy', a wolf of the Pleistocene era has been isolated, and its sequence analyzed in a new study by Oliver Smith of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues publishing on July 30 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. (2019-07-30)
It's dog eat dog on the canine social ladder
Climbing the social ladder is a ruff business for dogs, new research shows. (2019-07-02)
Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report
Sea otters have very low genetic diversity, a UCLA-led team of life scientists reports June 18 in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. (2019-06-18)
The evolution of puppy dog eyes
Dogs have evolved new muscles around the eyes to better communicate with humans. (2019-06-17)
Fathers aid development of larger brains
The bigger the brain, the more intelligent a mammalian species is. (2019-06-03)
Genomics of Isle Royale wolves reveal impacts of inbreeding
A new paper explores the genetic signatures of a pair of wolves isolated on Isle Royale, a remote national park in Lake Superior. (2019-05-29)
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