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Altered sense of taste present in half of COVID-19 cases
A systematic review of COVID-19 cases finds nearly half of patients reported changes to or complete loss of their sense of taste. (2020-05-27)
'Bee' thankful for the evolution of pollen
Over 80% of the world's flowering plants must reproduce in order to produce new flowers, according to the US Forest Service. (2020-05-20)
Emerging viral diseases causing serious issues in west Africa
In a new study, researchers from the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus call attention to the emergence of mosquito-borne viral outbreaks in West Africa, such as dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV) and Zika (ZIKV) viruses. (2020-05-19)
Viral infection: Early indicators of vaccine efficacy
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich researchers have shown that a specific class of immune cells in the blood induced by vaccination is an earlier indicator of vaccine efficacy than conventional tests for neutralizing antibodies. (2020-05-15)
AJR details COVID-19 infection control, radiographer protection in CT exam areas
In an open-access article published ahead-of-print by the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), a team of Chinese radiologists discuss modifications to the CT examination process and strict disinfection of examination rooms, while outlining personal protection measures for radiographers during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. (2020-05-15)
Researchers find the key to preserving The Scream
Moisture is the main environmental factor that triggers the degradation of the masterpiece The Scream (1910?) by Edvard Munch, according to the finding of an international team of scientists led by the CNR (Italy), using a combination of in situ non-invasive spectroscopic methods and synchrotron X-ray techniques. (2020-05-15)
Ancient DNA unveils important missing piece of human history
Newly released genomes from Neolithic East Asia have unveiled a missing piece of human prehistory, according to a study conducted by Professor FU Qiaomei's team from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2020-05-14)
Coronavirus infection in children -- it may not start with a cough
Children suffering from sickness and diarrhea, coupled with a fever or history of exposure to coronavirus, should be suspected of being infected with COVID-19, recommends a new study by doctors from Wuhan, China, who detail five cases of coronavirus in children who had no initial signs of respiratory illness. (2020-05-12)
New AI diagnostic can predict COVID-19 without testing
Researchers at King's College London, Massachusetts General Hospital and health science company ZOE have developed an artificial intelligence diagnostic that can predict whether someone is likely to have COVID-19 based on their symptoms. (2020-05-11)
Yellow-legged gull adapts its annual lifecycle to human activities to get food
The yellow-legged gull has a high ability to adapt to human activities and benefit from these as a food resource during all year. (2020-05-05)
Found: Neural circuit that drives physical responses to emotional stress
Researchers at Nagoya University have discovered a neural circuit that drives physical responses to emotional stress. (2020-05-02)
Understanding the initial immune response after dengue virus infection
This study sheds new light on the body's initial response to dengue virus infection, describing the molecular diversity and specificity of the antibody response. (2020-05-01)
Gravitational waves could prove the existence of the quark-gluon plasma
According to modern particle physics, matter produced when neutron stars merge is so dense that it could exist in a state of dissolved elementary particles. (2020-04-30)
Scientists uncover how Zika virus can spread through sexual contact
Zika virus is capable of replicating and spreading infectious particles within the outermost cells lining the vaginal tract, according to new research. (2020-04-27)
Fracking and earthquake risk
Earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing can damage property and endanger lives. (2020-04-27)
Silent, airborne transmission likely to be a key factor in scarlet fever outbreaks
New research due to be presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows that the airborne transmission, both through symptomatic patients and those who are shedding the virus with no symptoms, may be key factors in the spread of scarlet fever. (2020-04-20)
Two novel viruses identified in Brazilian patients with suspected dengue
Species never before found in humans described in PLOS ONE belong to the genera Ambidensovirus and Chapparvovirus. (2020-04-17)
Genetic variation not an obstacle to gene drive strategy to control mosquitoes
New research from entomologists at UC Davis clears a potential obstacle to using CRISPR-Cas9 'gene drive' technology to control mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever and Zika. (2020-04-16)
Low-cost imaging system poised to provide automatic mosquito tracking
Mosquito-transmitted diseases such as malaria, dengue and yellow fever are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths every year, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). (2020-04-15)
Loss of smell and taste validated as COVID-19 symptoms in patients with high recovery rate
Researchers at UC San Diego Health publish the first empirical findings that strongly associate sensory loss and COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the novel coronavirus. (2020-04-13)
Stuttering DNA orchestrates the start of the mosquito's life
There are large parts of the DNA that are not used for making proteins. (2020-04-09)
Case study: Treating COVID-19 in a patient with multiple myeloma
A case study of a patient in Wuhan, China, suggests that the immunosuppressant tocilizumab may be an effective COVID-19 treatment for very ill patients who also have multiple myeloma and other blood cancers. (2020-04-03)
When warblers warn of cowbirds, blackbirds get the message
This is the story of three bird species and how they interact. (2020-03-31)
Infants prefer individuals who achieve their goals efficiently
From birth, we acquire information and learn through interacting with others; that is why it is so important to be able to identify the most suitable individuals to interact with. (2020-03-31)
Reduced off-odor of plastic recyclates via separate collection of packaging waste
Plastic recyclates produced from waste packaging have to meet high sensory requirements in order to be used for new products. (2020-03-31)
Individuals taking class of steroid medications at high risk for COVID-19
Individuals taking a class of steroid hormones called glucocorticoids for conditions such as asthma, allergies and arthritis on a routine basis may be unable to mount a normal stress response and are at high risk if they are infected with the virus causing COVID-19, according to a new editorial published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-03-31)
Caring for seniors during COVID-19 pandemic
Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine scientist Kathleen Unroe, MD, MHA, and colleagues lay out guidelines and best practices for healthcare providers and family caregivers who are providing care for older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-03-31)
New research shows promise to treat female group A streptococcus genital tract infections
Puerperal sepsis, also known as childbed fever, is the leading cause of maternal deaths. (2020-03-19)
The Lancet: Study details first known person-to-person transmission of new coronavirus in the USA
New research published in The Lancet, describes in detail the first locally-transmitted case of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes COVID-19, in the USA, from a woman who had recently travelled to China and transmitted the infection to her husband. (2020-03-12)
App, AI work together to provide rapid at-home assessment of coronavirus risk
A coronavirus app coupled with machine intelligence will soon enable an individual to get an at-home risk assessment based on how they feel and where they've been in about a minute, and direct those deemed at risk to the nearest definitive testing facility, investigators say. (2020-03-05)
App detecting jaundice may prevent deaths in newborns
A smartphone app that allows users to check for jaundice in newborn babies simply by taking a picture of the eye may be an effective, low-cost way to screen for the condition, according to a pilot study led by UCL and UCLH. (2020-03-02)
Lessons learned from addressing myths about Zika and yellow fever outbreaks in Brazil
When disease epidemics and outbreaks occur, conspiracy theories often emerge that compete with the information provided by public health officials. (2020-02-27)
Study finds key mechanism for how typhoid bacteria infects
A new study has uncovered key details for how the Salmonella bacteria that causes typhoid fever identifies a host's immune cells and delivers toxins that disrupt the immune system and allow the pathogen to spread. (2020-02-25)
Researchers show how Ebola virus hijacks host lipids
Robert Stahelin studies some of the world's deadliest viruses. Filoviruses, including Ebola virus and Marburg virus, cause viral hemorrhagic fever with high fatality rates. (2020-02-15)
Orb-weaver spiders' yellow and black pattern helps them lure prey
Being inconspicuous might seem the best strategy for spiders to catch potential prey in their webs, but many orb-web spiders, which hunt in this way, are brightly coloured. (2020-02-11)
Army-developed Zika vaccine induces potent Zika and dengue cross-neutralizing antibodies
A new study led by WRAIR scientists has shown for the first time that a single dose of an experimental Zika vaccine in a dengue-experienced individual can boost pre-existing flavivirus immunity and elicit protective cross-neutralizing antibody responses against both Zika and dengue viruses. (2020-02-03)
Novel approach to immune system could lead to personalized therapy against sepsis
Two mechanisms could afford an alternative approach to studying and treating severe conditions such as sepsis. (2020-01-23)
New experimental vaccine for African swine fever virus shows promise
Government and academic investigators have developed a vaccine against African swine fever that appears to be far more effective than previously developed vaccines. (2020-01-23)
West Nile virus triggers brain inflammation by inhibiting protein degradation
West Nile virus (WNV) inhibits autophagy -- an essential system that digests or removes cellular constituents such as proteins -- to induce the aggregation of proteins in infected cells, triggering cell death and brain inflammation (encephalitis), according to Hokkaido University researchers. (2020-01-23)
Making 'lemonade': Chance observation leads to study of microbial bloom formation
A team from the Microbial Diversity course at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass., studied a brackish, shallow lagoon over time and found it releases hydrogen sulfide, particularly upon physical disturbance, causing blooms of anoxygenic sulfur-oxidizing phototrophs. (2020-01-23)
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