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Current Zika virus News and Events

Current Zika virus News and Events, Zika virus News Articles.
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Aerosol microdroplets inefficient carriers of COVID-19 virus
Aerosol microdroplets do not appear to be extremely efficient at spreading the virus that leads to COVID-19. (2020-10-27)
New York City's coronavirus outbreak spread from more European sources than first reported
The COVID-19 pandemic started earlier than previously thought in New York City and Long Island by dozens of people infected mostly with strains from Europe. (2020-10-26)
T-Cells from recovered COVID-19 patients show promise to protect vulnerable patients from infection
T-cells taken from the blood of people who recovered from a COVID-19 infection can be successfully multiplied in the lab and maintain the ability to effectively target proteins that are key to the virus's function, according to a new study published Oct. (2020-10-26)
CRISPR screen identifies genes, drug targets to protect against SARS-CoV-2 infection
Study demonstrates how changes in human genes can reduce SARS-CoV-2 infection and describes a wide array of genes that have not previously been considered as therapeutic targets for SARS-CoV-2. (2020-10-26)
Illinois study tracks evolution of SARS-CoV-2 virus mutations
Since COVID-19 began its menacing march across Wuhan, China, in December 2019, and then across the world, the SARS-CoV-2 virus has taken a 'whatever works' strategy to ensure its replication and spread. (2020-10-26)
New COVID-19 related genes -- helpful and harmful -- found in massive screen
Researchers at Yale University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard screened hundreds of millions of cells exposed to the COVID-19 and MERS viruses and identified dozens of genes that both enable the viruses to replicate in cells and also those that seem to slam the door on the virus. (2020-10-26)
SARS-CoV-2 antibodies detectable up to seven months post COVID-19 onset, shows new Portuguese study
A new study led by Marc Veldhoen, principal investigator at Instituto de Medicina Molecular with an interdisciplinary team of clinicians and researchers from FMUL and CHLN and collaborators at IPST, shows that 90% of subjects have detectable antibodies 40 days up to 7 months post contracting COVID-19. (2020-10-23)
A promising discovery could lead to better treatment for Hepatitis C
Virologists at Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) have identified a critical role played by a cellular protein in the progression of Hepatitis C virus infection, paving the way for more effective treatment. (2020-10-22)
Multiple sclerosis as the flip side of immune fitness
About half of the people with multiple sclerosis have the HLA-DR15 gene variant. (2020-10-22)
Immune response the probable underlying cause of neural damage in COVID-19
It is probably the immune response to, rather than the virus in itself, that causes sudden confusion and other symptoms from the nervous system in some patients with COVID-19. (2020-10-22)
Lab-grown mini-lungs mimic the real thing - right down to covid infection
A team of Duke researchers has developed a lab-grown living lung model that mimics the tiny air sacs of the lungs where coronavirus infection and serious lung damage take place. (2020-10-22)
'Mini-lungs' reveal early stages of SARS-CoV-2 infection
'Mini-lungs' grown from tissue donated to Cambridge hospitals has provided a team of scientists from South Korea and the UK with important insights into how COVID-19 damages the lungs. (2020-10-22)
Details about broadly neutralizing antibodies provide insights for universal flu vaccine
New research from an immunology team at the University of Chicago may shed light on the challenges of developing a universal flu vaccine that would provide long-lasting and broad protection against influenza viruses. (2020-10-22)
Coronavirus mutations show early safety measures and restrictions limited viral spread
Scientists analyzed genomic information from over 6,000 samples of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-10-22)
Hidden states of the COVID-19 spike protein
Computer modeling of the COVID-19 virus on supercomputers showed that the spike protein visits an intermediate state before it can dock to the receptor protein on the host cell membrane. (2020-10-21)
Observed COVID-19 variability may have underlying molecular sources
People have different susceptibilities to SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic, and develop varying degrees of fever, fatigue, and breathing problems -- common symptoms of the illness. (2020-10-21)
Tracking the SARS-CoV-2 virus with genome sequencing
Dirk Dittmer, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology at the UNC School of Medicine, is tracking the virus that causes COVID-19 by sequencing the genome of virus samples collected from diagnostic testing. (2020-10-21)
Coronavirus: Study finds further door opener into the cell
The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is known to infect cells via the receptor ACE2. (2020-10-20)
Neuropilin-1 drives SARS-CoV-2 infectivity, finds breakthrough study
In a major breakthrough an international team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has potentially identified what makes SARS-CoV-2 highly infectious and able to spread rapidly in human cells. (2020-10-20)
Two studies point to an unrecognized avenue for anti-viral therapies against COVID-19
Helping to explain what makes SARS-CoV-2 so capable of infecting human cells, researchers in two independent studies discovered that the virus's spike protein recognizes and binds a protein on the human cell surface called neuropilin-1. (2020-10-20)
Effective ventilation may be a key factor in preventing the spread of COVID-19
During the first wave of COVID-19, which paralyzed the world in spring, it was initially thought that effective hand washing and 2-meter social distancing would help prevent the highly contagious virus. (2020-10-20)
COVID-19: Distancing and masks are not enough
Decades-old data is being used to describe the propagation of tiny droplets. (2020-10-20)
Computational study reveals how Ebola nucleocapsid stabilizes
Scientists at the University of Delaware report a computational study of the Ebola virus nucleocapsid and show that the binding of the ssRNA allows the nucleocapsid to maintain its shape and structural integrity. (2020-10-20)
Targeting the shell of the Ebola virus
As the world grapples with COVID-19, the Ebola virus is again raging. (2020-10-20)
Researchers discovered the second 'key' used by the SARS-CoV-2 virus to enter into huma
To efficiently infect human cells, SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is able to use a receptor called Neuropilin-1, which is very abundant in many human tissues including the respiratory tract, blood vessels and neurons. (2020-10-20)
Light pollution may increase biting behavior at night in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes
Artificial light abnormally increases mosquito biting behavior at night in a species that typically prefers to bite people during the day, according to research from the University of Notre Dame that was published in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (2020-10-20)
Evidence review confirms CDC guidance about infectivity of novel coronavirus
A new review of dozens of studies suggests that people may shed virus for prolonged periods, but those with mild or no symptoms may be infectious for no more than about 10 days. (2020-10-20)
Mouthwashes, oral rinses may inactivate human coronaviruses
Certain oral antiseptics and mouthwashes may have the ability to inactivate human coronaviruses, according to a Penn State College of Medicine research study. (2020-10-19)
Hesitancy about a COVID-19 vaccine is linked to beliefs about origin of the virus
More than a third of people (34%) in Turkey and one sixth of people (17%) in the UK are 'hesitant' about a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a study by UCL and Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey. (2020-10-19)
CRISPR-induced immune diversification in host-virus populations
Just like humans, microbes have equipped themselves with tools to recognize and defend themselves against viral invaders. (2020-10-19)
Patients who had more severe covid-19 may be the best donors for convalescent plasma therapy
Sex, age, and severity of disease may be useful in identifying COVID-19 survivors who are likely to have high levels of antibodies that can protect against the disease. (2020-10-19)
In recovering COVID-19 patients, antibodies fade quickly
This week in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers report that antibody levels in the blood of COVID-19 patients drop rapidly during the weeks after their bodies have cleared the virus and symptoms have subsided. (2020-10-16)
Stopping the virus and closing borders
Travel restrictions implemented early on in the pandemic have been crucial in slowing the spread of the coronavirus and keeping death rates low. (2020-10-16)
Pinpointing the 'silent' mutations that gave the coronavirus an evolutionary edge
We know that the coronavirus behind the COVID-19 crisis lived harmlessly in bats and other wildlife before it jumped the species barrier and spilled over to humans. (2020-10-16)
Drug repurposing
University of New Mexico researchers identify three existing drugs with the potential to clear SARS-CoV-2 infections. (2020-10-16)
Study shows main cell type in the liver has key role in defending against some viruses
Scientists at Scripps Research have uncovered an important disease-fighting role for cells called hepatocytes, which constitute most of the liver. (2020-10-16)
Australian carp virus plan 'dead in the water'
Plans to release a virus to reduce numbers of invasive Common Carp in Australia are unlikely to work and should be dropped, researchers say. (2020-10-15)
Will the COVID-19 virus become endemic?
A new article in the journal Science by Columbia Mailman School researchers Jeffrey Shaman and Marta Galanti explores the potential for the COVID-19 virus to become endemic, a regular feature producing recurring outbreaks in humans. (2020-10-15)
Global study identifies common vulnerabilities across SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS coronaviruses
There are common vulnerabilities among three lethal coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV, such as frequently hijacked cellular pathways, that could lead to promising targets for broad coronavirus inhibition, according to a study by an international research team that includes scientists from the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2020-10-15)
AJTMH tip sheet for October 2020
Your advance look at two new studies publishing online on October 15, 2020 in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (2020-10-15)
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