Amphibians Current Events

Amphibians Current Events, Amphibians News Articles.
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Are otters threatening amphibian populations?
The Eurasian otter typically eats fish, but amphibians, which are in global decline, are also part of its diet, especially when fish are scarce. In a Mammal Review study, researchers identified bones of amphibians in otter faeces from southern Italy to determine which types of amphibians are typically eaten. They also reviewed 64 studies of otter diet. (2019-05-09)

Timber harvest impacts amphibians differently during life stages
University of Missouri researchers found that removing all of the trees from a section of the forest had a negative effect on amphibians during their later life cycles, but had some positive effects during amphibians' aquatic larva stages at the beginning of their lives. To lessen the negative effects during the later life stage, Semlitsch recommends partial or selection cuts to forests rather than completely removing trees from an area. (2009-11-03)

Zoology: Biofluorescence may be widespread among amphibians
Biofluorescence, where organisms emit a fluorescent glow after absorbing light energy, may be widespread in amphibians including salamanders and frogs, according to a study in Scientific Reports. Biofluorescence had previously been observed in only one salamander and three frog species. (2020-02-27)

Light at night is harmful for amphibians, new research shows
Light at night might be convenient for humans, but it's having a detrimental effect on amphibian populations, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-05-28)

Amphibians respond behaviorally to impact of clear cutting
The number of amphibians drastically decreases in forest areas that are clearcut, according to previous studies. A University of Missouri researcher, however, has found that some animals may not be dying. Instead, the Mizzou biologist said some animals may be moving away (possibly to return later) or retreating underground. The finding could have major implications for both the timber industry and the survival of amphibians. (2008-03-10)

Small insects attacks and kill amphibians much bigger than themselves
New findings of researchers from Tel-Aviv University show that predator-prey interactions between ground beetles of the genus Epomis and amphibians are much more complex than expected. The study was published in the open access journal Zoo Keys. (2011-05-20)

Study confirms amphibians' ability to predict changes in biodiversity
Biologists have long suspected that amphibians, whose moist permeable skins make them susceptible to slight changes in the environment, might be good bellwethers for impending alterations in biodiversity during rapid climate change. (2008-10-28)

Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change
Amphibians have few options to avoid the underappreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others. Rising summer temperatures are also resulting in higher rates of dehydration among wet-skinned amphibians as they attempt to keep themselves cool. (2020-07-15)

European salamanders and newts vulnerable to fungal disease from Asia
A skin-eating fungal disease brought to Europe by humans now poses a major threat to native salamanders and newts, scientists have warned. (2014-10-30)

Canaries in a coal mine?
The worldwide decline of amphibians is part of a general biodiversity crisis. Amphibians are thought to be indicator species, or 'canaries in a coal mine' that provide an early warning of environmental degradation. In a special issue of Diversity and Distributions (March), Collins & Storfer suggest that amphibians are not canaries, but they are likely sending us the same message - our environment is changing and we are in danger if we don't pay attention! (2003-02-25)

How does a frog heal wounded skin without scarring?
When a Xenopus frog is deeply wounded, its skin can regenerate without scarring. Researchers have found that cells under the skin contribute to this regeneration after an excision injury. (2017-06-15)

Traffic harms Asturian amphibians
Midwife toads and palmate newts are run over and their habitats are fragmented by roads in the Trubia valley. According to a Spanish study, alleviating traffic is not enough to minimize the impact on midwife toad populations. (2012-04-12)

A deadly fungus is killing frogs, but the bacteria on their skin could protect them
Researchers in Costa Rica have found that some bacteria on the skin of amphibians prevent growth of the fungus responsible for what has been dubbed 'the amphibian apocalypse'. (2021-02-03)

Discovery in the evolution of the immune system absorbing cells
The UAB has taken part in a research project that has just made a discovery that questions one of the paradigms of vertebrate immunology: that phagocytosis (the ability to (2006-10-04)

Amphibians can become tolerant to pesticides, but at a cost
Amphibians can develop tolerance to pesticides, but this tolerance can lead to increased susceptibility to parasites, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2017-07-17)

New report details historic mass extinction of amphibians
Amphibians, reigning survivors of past mass extinctions, are sending a clear, unequivocal signal that something is wrong, as their extinction rates rise to unprecedented levels, according to a paper published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Humans are exacerbating two key natural threats -- climate change and a deadly disease that is jumping from one species to another. (2008-08-11)

Amphibians as environmental omen disputed
Amphibians, for years considered a leading indicator of environmental degradation, are not uniquely susceptible to pollution, according to a meta-analysis to be published in Ecology Letters. (2009-11-10)

Amphibians in losing race with environmental change
Even though they had the ability to evolve and survive for hundreds of millions of years -- since before the time of the dinosaurs and through many climatic regimes -- the massive, worldwide decline of amphibians can best be understood by their inability to keep pace with the current rate of global change, a new study suggests. (2007-05-01)

An unprecedented role reversal: Ground beetle larvae lure amphibians and prey upon them
Beetle larvae are able to lure their amphibious predators and consume them with almost 100 percent success, a new study shows. (2011-09-21)

Whooping cranes' predatory behavior key for adaptation, survival
The whooping crane, with its snowy white plumage and trumpeting call, is one of the most beloved American birds, and one of the most endangered. As captive-raised cranes are re-introduced in Louisiana, they are gaining a new descriptor: natural killer. A new study from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, suggests Louisiana cranes are faring well thanks in part to their penchant for hunting reptiles and amphibians. (2016-02-10)

A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers
A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers, many of whom were part of the original 2016 report. (2020-11-05)

When naproxen breaks down, toads croak
A new study in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry takes a harder look at the effects a common anti-inflammatory medication and its degradation products have on amphibians. There have been many studies that review the toxicity of naproxen, a common over-the-counter pain reliever, but none until now that have reviewed the effects it or its degradation products might have on amphibians. (2019-08-12)

Environmental concerns increasing infectious disease in amphibians, other animals
Climate change, habitat destruction, pollution and invasive species are all involved in the global crisis of amphibian declines and extinctions, researchers suggest in a new analysis, but increasingly these forces are causing actual mortality in the form of infectious disease. (2012-07-18)

Ray Semlitsch receives 2011 Fitch Award for Excellence in Herpetology
Ray Semlitsch, Curators' Professor of Biology in the College of Arts and Science at the University of Missouri, is the recipient of the 2011 Fitch Award for Excellence in Herpetology from the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists. (2011-08-03)

Beavers may help amphibians threatened by climate change
A study of pond sites in the Cascades found greater amphibian diversity in sites with beaver damns. Red-legged frogs and northwestern salamanders, which develop more slowly, were detected almost exclusively in dammed sites. (2020-12-08)

Preserved frogs hold clues to deadly pathogen
A Yale graduate student has developed a novel means for charting the history of a pathogen deadly to amphibians worldwide. (2012-06-20)

Use of glow sticks in traps greatly increases amphibian captures in study
With amphibian populations declining around the world and funds to find the causes scarce, a team of Penn State researchers has shown that an unorthodox tactic will make it easier and therefore less expensive to capture adult salamanders and frogs. (2017-11-07)

USGS Responds to Amphibian Declines With Program In Great Smokey Mountains National Park
Frogs, toads, and salamanders are just a few of the 40 species of amphibians that U.S. Geological Survey scientists will survey over the next 5 years in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, a region that has the greatest diversity of amphibians in North America. (1998-05-29)

Should keeping reptiles and amphibians as pets be restricted?
Keeping exotic pets, such as reptiles and amphibians, has become increasingly popular, but concerns over public health and safety, animal welfare and conservation have sparked debate. Several articles published by Veterinary Record today analyze arguments for and against the growing trade in -- and keeping of -- reptiles and amphibians. (2017-10-26)

GW researcher reveals how amphibians crossed continents
A George Washington University professor has succeeded in constructing a first-of-its-kind comprehensive diagram of the geographic distribution of amphibians, showing the movement of 3,309 species between 12 global ecoregions. (2014-08-04)

Poisonous amphibian defenses are linked to higher extinction risk
Research published by a Swansea University scientist has found amphibians which have a toxic defense against predators -- such as the iconic poison dart frogs -- have a much higher risk of extinction than species which use other types of defense mechanisms. (2016-11-22)

Prescribed burns can threaten pine Savannah amphibians
While longleaf pine savannahs in the southeast U.S. depend on periodic fires, today's prescribed burns are set too often for the tremendous diversity of amphibians living there. New research suggests that the current burn cycle of every two-to-three years decreases the number of amphibian species per pond by about half. (2003-09-23)

Killer fungus threatening amphibians
Amphibians like frogs and toads have existed for 360 million years and survived when the dinosaurs didn't, but a new aquatic fungus is threatening to make many of them extinct, according to an article in the November issue of Microbiology Today. (2009-11-23)

Parasites might spur evolution of strange amphibian breeding habits
Parasites can decimate amphibian populations, but one University of Georgia researcher believes they might also play a role in spurring the evolution of new and sometimes bizarre breeding strategies. (2007-11-14)

Colombian frog believed extinct found alive
Researchers exploring a Colombian mountain range found surviving members of a species of Harlequin frog believed extinct due to a killer fungus wiping out amphibian populations in Central and South America. The discovery of what could be the last population of the painted frog (Atelopus ebenoides marinkellei) indicates the species has survived the fungus, providing hope that other species also might avoid elimination from the epidemic caused by a pathogenic fungus of unknown origin. (2006-05-18)

Atrazine alters the sex ration in Blanchard's cricket frogs
A study published recently in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry found that Blanchard's cricket frogs are highly sensitive to atrazine. When exposed, there were up to 55 percent fewer males than females compared with the control group, indicating that atrazine can affect the sex ratio. However, cricket frog populations do persist in areas with widespread atrazine application, despite reports of range contractions for enigmatic reasons. (2017-10-13)

Possible biological control discovered for pathogen devastating amphibians
Zoologists have discovered that a freshwater species of zooplankton will eat a fungal pathogen which is devastating amphibian populations around the world. It could provide a desperately needed tool for biological control of this deadly fungus. (2011-08-25)

Bullfrogs may help spread deadly amphibian fungus, but also die from it
Amphibian populations are declining worldwide and a major cause is a deadly fungus thought to be spread by bullfrogs, but a two-year study shows they can also die from this pathogen, contrary to suggestions that bullfrogs are a tolerant carrier host that just spreads the disease. (2013-06-17)

Size matters in the battle to adapt to diverse environments and avoid extinction
By examining research on global patterns of amphibian diversification over hundreds of millions of years, De Lisle and Rowe discovered that 'sexually dimorphic' species -- those in which males and females differ in size, for example -- are at lower risk of extinction and better able to adapt to diverse environments. (2015-02-18)

Fragmentation may be linked to local amphibian extinctions
Habitat fragmentation is a primary threat to amphibians worldwide, and new research suggests one of the reasons why. Experimental evidence for three species shows that fragmentation may hinder the dispersal of juvenile amphibians, which could contribute to population declines. (2002-09-24)

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