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Bird Species Current Events

Bird Species Current Events, Bird Species News Articles.
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Birds are on the move in the face of climate change
Research on birds in northern Europe reveals that there is an ongoing considerable species turnover due to climate change and due to land use and other direct human influences. (2017-09-07)
Populations of common birds across europe are declining
Across Europe, the population of common birds has declined rapidly over the last 30 years, while some of the less abundant species are stable or increasing in number. (2014-11-04)
It's a bird-eat-bird world
Baby birds and eggs are on the menu for at least 94 species of animals in Australia's forests and woodlands, according to new research from the University of Queensland. (2019-01-24)
Smooth dance moves confirm new bird-of-paradise species
Newly publicized audiovisuals support full species status for one of the dancing birds-of-paradise in New Guinea. (2018-04-17)
Nearly three billion fewer birds in North America since 1970
North America has lost nearly three billion birds since 1970, according to a new report, which also details widespread population declines among hundreds of North American bird species, including those once considered abundant. (2019-09-19)
New research identifies the plight of farmland birds
Farmland birds that are poorer parents and less (2010-11-03)
APS tip sheet: Using bird song to determine bird size
An analysis of a bird species' unique rasps shows how sound fluctuations in birds' songs might reveal details about birds' body sizes. (2020-03-02)
University of Tennessee professor links massive prehistoric bird extinction to human colonization
Research by Alison Boyer, a research assistant professor in ecology and evolutionary biology, and an international team studied the extinction rates of nonperching land birds in the Pacific Islands from 700 to 3,500 years ago. (2013-04-01)
Researchers untangle mystery of tiny bird's trans-Pacific flight
Zoologists have documented the first record of a House Swift in the Americas -- and begun to unravel the mystery of how the tiny bird got from its south-east Asia breeding grounds to British Columbia, Canada. (2017-06-01)
Many North American birds may lose part of range under climate change scenarios
Over 50 percent of nearly 600 surveyed bird species may lose more than half of their current geographic range across three climate change scenarios through the end of the century in North America. (2015-09-02)
More evidence of major global extinctions
In their paper in this week's issue of Science, Regional Extinction Rates of British Butterflies, Birds and Plants, the authors (Note 2) conclude that (2004-03-18)
Abandoned farmlands enrich bird communities
Abandoned farmlands hold potential for the preservation of wetland and grassland birds as rehabilitation zones. (2018-08-02)
Bird recognition
Birds play an important role in a wide variety of ecosystems as both predator and prey, in controlling insect populations, pollinating and seed dispersal for many plants, and in releasing nutrients on to land and sea in the form of guano. (2018-01-03)
Australian Magpie 'dunks' its food before eating, researchers find
Scientists at the University of York, in collaboration with researchers at Western Sydney University, have shown that the Australian Magpie may 'dunk' its food in water before eating, a process that appears to be 'copied' by its offspring. (2017-09-07)
New Peruvian bird species discovered by its song
A new species of bird from the heart of Peru remained undetected for years until researchers identified it by its unique song. (2017-10-23)
The impact of human-caused noise pollution on birds
Anthropogenic noise pollution (ANP) is a globally invasive phenomenon impacting natural systems, but most research has occurred at local scales with few species. (2019-10-11)
Dutch barnacle geese have more active immune system than same species in the North
Bird migration is an impressive phenomenon, but why birds often travel huge distances to and from their breeding grounds in the far North is still very unclear. (2014-12-17)
Mapping movements of alien bird species
The global map of alien bird species has been produced for the first time by a UCL-led team of researchers. (2017-01-12)
Hunting by humans significantly reduces bird and mammal populations
In tropical forests, bird and mammal populations are significantly lower -- 53 percent and 82 percent respectively -- in areas where hunting occurs, a new study finds. (2017-04-13)
Museum bird DNA 'ready for use' in Naturalis Biodiversity Center
An Iranian ornithologist used a (2013-12-30)
Rare North Island brown kiwi hatches at the Smithsonian's National Zoo
Early Friday morning, March 7, one of the world's most endangered species -- a North Island brown kiwi -- hatched at the Smithsonian's National Zoo Bird House. (2008-03-12)
Evidence human activities have shaped large-scale ecological patterns
A new study published in the Journal of Biogeography provides some of the first evidence that ecological patterns at large spatial scales have been significantly altered within recent human history suggesting a role for human activities as potential drivers. (2006-06-07)
Cambodia moves to protect endangered bird
In an effort to protect a large grassland bird from possible extinction, the government of Cambodia has recently moved to set aside more than 100 square miles of habitat for the Bengal florican, a bird now classified as endangered, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society. (2006-11-06)
University biologist publishes book on bird speciation
A University of Chicago biologist and world-renowned expert on bird speciation has compiled eight years of research and writing into a recently published book, (2007-09-25)
Seed dispersal by invasive birds in Hawaii fills critical ecosystem gap
On the Hawaiian island of O'ahu, where native birds have nearly been replaced by invasive ones, local plants depend almost entirely on invasive birds to disperse their seeds, new research shows. (2019-04-04)
Native birds in South-eastern Australia worst affected by habitat
New research has found that habitat loss is a major concern for hundreds of Australian bird species, and south-eastern Australia has been the worst affected. (2019-09-02)
Burly bird gets the worm
The pecking order of garden birds is determined by their size and weight, new research shows. (2018-09-05)
Bird decline shows that climate change is more than just hot air
Scientists have long known that birds are feeling the heat due to climate change. (2015-11-16)
How birds learn foreign languages
Biologists have succeeded in teaching wild birds to understand a new language. (2015-07-16)
Study finds some desert birds less affected by wildfires and climate change
A new Baylor University study has found that some bird species in the desert southwest are less affected, and in some cases positively influenced, by widespread fire through their habitat. (2011-07-19)
Singing in the rain: Technology improves monitoring of bird sounds
Researchers have created a new computer technology that can listen to multiple bird sounds at one time to identify which species are present and how they may be changing as a result of habitat loss or climate change. (2012-05-31)
New owl species discovered in Indonesia is unique to one island
A new owl is the first endemic bird species discovered on the island of Lombok, Indonesia, according to research published Feb. (2013-02-13)
A mountain bird's survival guide to climate change
Researchers at Yale University have found that the risk of extinction for mountain birds due to global warming is greatest for species that occupy a narrow range of altitude. (2010-06-08)
BirdsEye -- a new iPhone app -- resolves your rapture for raptors or finding a finch
Looking for larks? Searching for surfbirds? Checking for chickadees? There's an app for that. (2009-12-03)
Research shows most bird feed contains troublesome weed seeds
Many millions of homeowners use feeders to attract birds. But a two-year study featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management suggests there may be one unintended consequence to this popular hobby. (2020-03-20)
Hiding in plain sight: New species of bird discovered in capital city
A team of scientists with the Wildlife Conservation Society, BirdLife International, and other groups have discovered a new species of bird with distinct plumage and a loud call living not in some remote jungle, but in a capital city of 1.5 million people. (2013-06-25)
A new bird which humans drove to extinction discovered in Azores
Inside the crater of a volcano on Graciosa Island in the Azores archipelago, in the Atlantic Ocean, an international team of researchers has discovered the bones of a new extinct species of songbird, a bullfinch which they have named Pyrrhula crassa. (2017-07-26)
Study: Bird diversity lessens human exposure to West Nile Virus
This one's for the birds. A study by biologists at Washington University in St. (2008-10-06)
Christmas Bird Count: Another Holiday Tradition
To make it easier for couch potato bird watchers, 30 years of counting is now available on the World Wide Web. (1996-12-19)
Chernobyl's radioactivity reduced the populations of birds of orange plumage
On April 26, 1986, history's greatest nuclear accident took place northwest of the Ukrainian city of Chernobyl. (2011-04-26)
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