Blood Cells Current Events

Blood Cells Current Events, Blood Cells News Articles.
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How blood can be rejuvenated
Our blood stem cells generate around a thousand billion new blood cells every day. But the blood stem cells' capacity to produce blood changes as we age. This leads to older people being more susceptible to anaemia, lowered immunity and a greater risk of developing certain kinds of blood cancer. Now for the first time, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has succeeded in rejuvenating blood stem cells with established reduced function in aging mice. The study is published in Nature Communications. (2017-02-23)

Key to understanding how blood and blood vessel cells develop discovered
Common sense leads to the conclusion that if you have blood cells you must have blood vessels and that if you have blood vessels they must have blood to carry. Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have presented the first clear evidence that nature ensures both develop together by using a common progenitor cell. (2004-12-14)

Super-potent blood stem cells discovered in human embryos
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Andrejs Ivanovs, Alexander Medvinsky (a.medvinsky@ed.ac.uk) and colleagues from the University of Edinburgh discovered that HSCs from early human embryos, when HSCs are just starting to form, are more robust at expanding than those from the cord blood. (2020-09-17)

U of MN researchers identify new cord blood stem cell
Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School have discovered a new population of cells in human umbilical cord blood that have properties of primitive stem cells. (2006-02-13)

Blood stem cells study could pave the way for new cancer therapy
People with leukaemia could be helped by new research that sheds light on how the body produces its blood supply. (2016-03-10)

Scientists discover how breast cancer cells spread from blood vessels
Researchers have identified a protein that controls how breast cancer cells spread around the body. (2016-02-09)

Human embryonic stem cells promising for replacement of blood supply
Researchers at the University of Minnesota Stem Cell Institute are one step closer to understanding how blood cells develop through the use of human embryonic stem cells. The research better defines the conditions under which blood cell development occurs, making the process easier to replicate. The findings are published in the October issue of Experimental Hematology. (2004-10-29)

U of MN researchers identify genes involved with blood stem cell development
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have identified for the first time a group of genes that impact the development and function of blood stem cells, a discovery that brings researchers a step closer to harnessing the power of stem cells for disease treatments. (2005-07-04)

Parasites from patients with cerebral malaria stick preferentially in their brains
A team at LSTM with their collaborators in Malawi and Denmark have provided, for the first time, evidence which links the ability of red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite to bind to the cells lining the blood vessels of the brain, with the clinical syndrome cerebral malaria. (2019-01-11)

Tumor microenvironment analyzed to increase effectiveness of preclinical trials
It was shown that co-culturing HeLa adenocarcinoma cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells results in changes in the proliferative activity of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stromal cell populations. (2019-04-02)

New red blood cell simulator invented at Queen Mary
Engineers from Queen Mary, University of London have developed the world's most precise computer simulation of how red blood cells might travel around the body to help doctors treat people with serious circulatory problems. (2013-06-27)

Where does your blood actually come from?
Scientists at Lund University in Sweden have developed a new understanding of how the first blood cells form during human development as they transition from endothelial cells to form blood cells of different types. (2017-04-06)

The secrets of bone marrow: What leads to healthy blood cell production?
The Medical College of Wisconsin has received a five-year, $635,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to identify new potential treatments for diseases that inhibit the growth of blood cells and diseases in which the blood cells develop abnormally. (2015-06-12)

Listening to blood cells: Simple test could use sound waves for diagnosing blood-related diseases
New research reveals that when red blood cells are hit with laser light, they produce high frequency sound waves that contain a great deal of information. Similar to the way one can hear the voices of different people and identify who they are, investigators could analyze the sound waves produced by red blood cells and recognize their shape and size. The information may aid in the development of simple tests for blood-related diseases. (2013-07-02)

Researchers tap into a new and potentially better source of platelets for transfusion
Japanese researchers may be one step closer to improving treatments for bleeding disorders. A group of researchers from the University of Tokyo has devised a way to maximize the numbers and function of clot-forming blood cells from mice. Their work will be published online in the Journal of Experimental Medicine on July 28. (2008-07-28)

New device identifies high-quality blood donors
Blood banks have long known about high-quality donors - individuals whose red blood cells stay viable longer in storage and in the recipient's body. Now a new device developed at UBC is showing promise as a method to identify these donors, potentially helping more than 4.5 million patients who need blood transfusions every year in Canada and the United States. (2020-02-03)

Blood vessel cells are instructed to form tube-like structures
A research group from Uppsala University shows for the first time that a special type of (2008-08-29)

New strategy for treating high blood pressure
The key to treating blood pressure might lie in people who are 'resistant' to developing high blood pressure even when they eat high salt diets, shows new research published today in Experimental Physiology. (2019-10-22)

Previously unknown effect of vitamin A identified
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a previously unknown effect of vitamin A in human embryonic development. Their findings show that vitamin A affects the formation of blood cells. (2015-02-24)

New target for the fight against cancer as a result of excessive blood vessel formation
New blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) stimulates the growth of cancer and other diseases. Anti-angiogenic inhibitors slow down cancer growth by disrupting the blood supply to the tumor. To date, the success of these treatments is limited by resistance, poor efficiency and harmful side effects. In the leading scientific journal Cell, Peter Carmeliet (VIB-KU Leuven) and his team reported that sugar metabolism (a process that we call glycolysis) also plays an essential role in the formation of new blood vessels. (2013-08-01)

Stem cells appear not to turn into heart cells
Two studies published in the online issue of Nature report no evidence to suggest that hematopoietic stem cells, which usually produce blood cells, can turn into heart cells after injection into the heart. These studies raise a cautionary note for interpreting the results of ongoing clinical studies in which hematopoietic stem cells are injected into the heart after a heart attack. (2004-03-21)

A better blood sugar test for diabetes
A new method for estimating blood sugar levels can cut diagnostic errors by more than 50 percent compared to the current widely used blood test, according to a study of more than 200 diabetic patients. (2016-10-05)

Killer immune cells that halt malaria could hold key to new vaccines
Scientists have revealed that immune cells called natural killer (NK) cells may play a key role in ridding the body of malaria-infected blood cells, a study in eLife reports. (2018-06-26)

Stem cells also rust
Oxygen in the air is well known to cause damaging rust on cars through a process known as oxidation. Similarly, a research group at Lund University in Sweden, has now identified that certain cells during embryonic development also are negatively affected by oxidation. This oxidation is capable of leading to a block in cellular function. (2016-10-25)

UBC research finds molecular 'key' to successful blood stem cell transplants
University of British Columbia researchers have discovered a (2009-04-22)

New U of T strategy will boost cord blood stem cells
A team of bioengineers led by the University of Toronto has discovered a way to increase the yield of stem cells from umbilical cord blood, to an extent which could broaden therapeutic use of these cells. (2005-10-18)

'Big data' helps to discover key factors driving blood cell specification
New research led by researchers at the University of Birmingham, alongside teams from the universities of Cambridge, Leeds and Manchester, has identified key factors that drive blood cell development by recapitulating this process in a culture dish. Cells with the ability to give rise to blood are normally specified in the early embryo over a number of developmental stages and eventually form blood stem cells that are maintained for life and generate trillions of blood cells every day. (2016-02-25)

Scientists discover how body fights to control spread of cancer
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found how two molecules fight in the blood to control the spread of cancer cells. (2007-01-08)

New type of blood cells work as indicators of autoimmunity
The team from Instituto de Medicina Molecular Lisboa, led by Luis Graça, analyzed blood samples from Sjögren syndrome patients, an autoimmune disease that affects the mucous membranes and moisture-secreting glands of the eyes and mouth, and found that these patients have a significant increase in a specific type of immune cells called T follicular regulatory cells (Tfr). (2017-08-11)

Exercise boosts health by influencing stem cells to become bone, not fat, McMaster researchers find
McMaster researchers have found one more reason to exercise: working out triggers influential stem cells to become bone instead of fat, improving overall health by boosting the body's capacity to make blood. (2011-09-01)

For the first time, scientists capture very moment blood flow begins
By capturing movies of both the blood and vasculature of zebrafish embryos, each less than two millimeters long, researchers have been able for the first time to see the very moment that blood begins to flow. (2010-06-03)

Surprise finding redraws 'map' of blood cell production
A study of the cells that respond to crises in the blood system has yielded a few surprises, redrawing the 'map' of how blood cells are made in the body. The finding, by researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, could have wide-ranging implications for understanding blood diseases such as myeloproliferative disorders as well as used to develop new ways of controlling how blood and clotting cells are produced. (2012-01-30)

Potassium is critical to circadian rhythms in human red blood cells
An innovative new study from the University of Surrey and Cambridge's MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications, has uncovered the secrets of the circadian rhythms in red blood cells and identified potassium as the key to unravelling the mystery. (2017-12-12)

Getting more mileage out of cord blood
Blood from human umbilical cords is rich in stem cells and decreases the risk of transplant rejection. However, the amount of blood cells collected from cords is often not sufficient for an adult recipient. Irwin Bernstein and colleagues at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle exposed cord blood to a molecule called Delta-1, expanding stem cell numbers 100-fold. These cells were also more potent in reconstituting the immune response following transplantation into mice. (2002-10-22)

Study shows that blood stem cells are influenced by their offspring
A new study by researchers at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne, Australia, has shown that mature blood cells can communicate with, and influence the behavior of, their stem cell (2010-11-29)

ViaCell Inc., the world's largest umbilical cord blood research and banking company comments on Bush administration's decision
ViaCell, Inc., a fully-integrated cellular therapy company committed to enabling the development of additional therapeutic applications for umbilical cord blood stem cells, commended the Bush Administration's decision to support additional funding for alternative sources of stem cells. Umbilical cord blood is considered an attractive alternative source and is an abundant and non-controversial store of neonatal stem cells.ViaCell has pioneered a platform technology, Selective Amplification™, that enables the expansion of the umbilical cord blood stem cell population. (2001-08-10)

Phase I Trial Promising For Cord Blood Transplant "Booster"
Adding a dose of slightly more mature stem cells to an umbilical cord blood transplant shows promise for increasing the success of transplants in children, Duke researchers reported Friday. (1998-12-04)

NUS scientists discover a new pathway essential for blood formation
Scientists from the National University of Singapore have discovered how a protein called Tip60 plays a vital role in the renewal of blood cells in the body. Without it, the stem cells that make new blood suffer catastrophic damage. This discovery could lead to better treatments for life-threatening blood-related diseases like leukemia. (2021-01-28)

The HLF gene protects blood stem cells by maintaining them in a resting state
The HLF gene is necessary for maintaining our blood stem cells in a resting state, which is crucial for ensuring normal blood production. This has been shown by a new research study from Lund University in Sweden published in Cell Reports. (2018-01-16)

The search for the origin of mast cells
A team of researchers from CNRS, INSERM and Aix-Marseille Université (AMU) at the Centre of immunology Marseille-Luminy, together with the Singapore Immunology Network, has proven that not all of the immune system's important mast cells are produced in bone marrow, as was previously thought. Scientists found embryonic mast cells in mice with functions that are likely to be different than the mast cells found in adults. The study appears in the June 2018 edition of Immunity. (2018-06-04)

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