Bmj Current Events

Bmj Current Events, Bmj News Articles.
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School PE lessons don't reflect kids' activity levels
The total amount of physical activity done by primary school children does not depend on how much physical education is timetabled at school because children compensate out of school, finds a study in this week's BMJ. (2003-09-11)

Children with chronic illness often show signs of mental health problems
Researchers from the University of Waterloo surveyed children between the ages of six and 16, and all within a month of their diagnosis with asthma, food allergy, epilepsy, diabetes or juvenile arthritis. (2018-01-04)

Unethical promotion of medicines is rife in India
The Indian government has failed to prevent the unethical and illegal promotion of prescription drugs, according to an editorial in this week's BMJ. (2004-04-01)

Dyslexia does not reduce pass rates for UK GP licensing exam
A study led by academics at the University of Lincoln has found that UK GPs who declare dyslexia prior to taking the AKT are just as likely to pass the knowledge component of the licensing exam as their counterparts. Candidates who declared dyslexia after initially failing the exam were more likely to be minority ethnic candidates with a primary medical qualification outside of the UK. (2018-02-12)

Study reveals benefits of having GPs in Emergency Departments
A new study from the University of Liverpool provides evidence that locating a General Practitioner (GP) in a hospital emergency department (ED) can reduce waiting times and admissions, but may increases antibiotic prescribing. (2017-10-06)

Sleepy drivers are eight times more likely to crash
Driving while feeling sleepy, driving after five hours or less of sleep, and driving between 2am and 5am are all associated with a substantial increase in the risk of a car crash resulting in serious injury or death, finds a study in this week's BMJ. (2002-05-09)

Racism is a public health issue
Racism may be important in the development of illness and countering it should be considered a public health issue, argues a senior psychiatrist in this week's BMJ. (2003-01-09)

Should doctors tell patients about expensive, unfunded drugs?
It is unethical and paternalistic for doctors to withhold information from patients about new drugs that are not yet publicly funded, say researchers in this week's BMJ. New drugs may be more effective than existing treatments, but many are very expensive and may not be available through publicly funded health schemes. (2005-11-03)

Screening has had 'little impact' on falling breast cancer deaths in the Netherlands
Breast screening in the Netherlands seems to have had a marginal effect on breast cancer mortality over the past 24 years, suggests research in The BMJ today. (2017-12-05)

Birth weight and social class linked to educational achievement
Birth weight and social class at birth have a strong influence on cognitive (mental) function in children, say researchers in this week's BMJ. (2002-08-08)

Tampon makers could help reduce violence against women
Manufacturers of feminine hygiene products, including tampons and sanitary products, could dedicate a part of their revenues to support public health programmes that prevent violence against women, argues an expert in The BMJ this week. (2016-06-28)

Activity monitors only effective when users set goals
The activity monitors that many received as holiday gifts won't automatically make their recipients active or healthy, new research indicates. However, trackers can have a significant impact when users establish clearly defined objectives. (2018-01-08)

Should we commit to eradicate malaria worldwide?
Should we commit to eradicate malaria worldwide, asks a debate article published by The BMJ today? (2017-03-03)

People in low social classes delay seeking treatment for schizophrenia
People born into low social classes are not at increased risk of developing schizophrenia, but they appear to seek treatment at a later age than those in higher social classes, concludes a study in this week's BMJ. (2001-12-13)

Physical activity in schools can improve children's fitness
A structured physical activity programme at school can improve children's fitness and decrease body fat, a study published on bmj.com today shows. (2010-02-23)

A holiday gift to primary care doctors: Proof of their time crunch
The average primary care doctor needs to work six more hours a day than they already do, in order to make sure their patients get all the preventive and early-detection care they deserve, a new study finds. Fortunately, the new study was written as a parody -- no one is asking doctors to work past midnight every night. At least, not yet. (2018-12-14)

Weight loss surgery associated with increased fracture risk
Severely obese patients undergoing weight loss surgery are more likely to have increased fracture risks both before and after the surgical procedure compared to obese and non-obese people people who don't need surgery, finds a large study published by The BMJ this week. (2016-07-27)

Communicating genetic disease risk has little or no impact on health related behavior
Communicating the results of DNA tests has little or no impact on behavior change, such as stopping smoking or increasing physical activity, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2016-03-15)

Leaders in Healthcare
Join aspiring leaders to address some of the biggest issues facing healthcare leadership and management in the UK, affecting the professional workforce as well as the population. (2016-10-19)

A method to measure diagnostic errors could be key to preventing disability and death from misdiagnosis
In an effort to reduce patient misdiagnoses and associated poor patient outcomes from lack of prompt treatment, a Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality researcher is helping to lead the way in providing hospitals a new approach to quantify and monitor diagnostic errors in their quality improvement efforts. The approach, called Symptom-Disease Pair Analysis of Diagnostic Error, or SPADE, is featured in a paper published today in BMJ Quality & Safety. (2018-01-22)

Alcohol limit for drink driving should be much lower
The alcohol limit for drink driving should be much lower, argues a researcher in this week's BMJ. (2004-04-08)

The BMJ reveals hundreds of drug company deals that commissioning groups fail to declare
Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England have accepted hundreds of payments from drug companies that they have not disclosed to patients and the public, reveals an investigation by The BMJ today. (2018-01-03)

Man develops severe 'thunderclap' headaches after eating world's hottest chili pepper
Taking part in a hot chili pepper eating contest might have some unexpected consequences, highlight doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports. (2018-04-09)

Leading doctors back legal action to force UK government to cut carbon emissions
In an open letter published by The BMJ today, 18 health professionals, including The BMJ's Editor in Chief Dr. Fiona Godlee, are supporting campaign group Plan B's legal challenge to force the government to revise its 2050 carbon target, saying it is inconsistent with the Paris Agreement temperature objective. (2017-12-07)

Many NHS partnerships with drug companies are out of public sight
NHS organisations are entering into working partnerships with drug companies, but they are not making the details, and even existence, of many of these deals available to the public, reveals an investigation by The BMJ today (2019-03-27)

Abortion care in the UK is 'heading towards a crisis,' warns expert
Abortion care in the UK is 'heading towards a crisis' and reform of the law is just one of the many obstacles that needs to be overcome, argues an expert in the Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. (2016-12-22)

Children from disadvantaged backgrounds do less vigorous physical activity
Children from disadvantaged backgrounds and certain ethnic minority backgrounds, including from Pakistani and Bangladeshi backgrounds, have lower levels of vigorous physical activity, according to researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2019-05-27)

Population health impact of infants born small for gestational age in low- and middle-income countries
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and CHERG used the first international, multi-ethnic birth weight standard, known as the INTERGROWTH-21st, to describe the global burden of suboptimal fetal growth. (2017-08-18)

Global treaty is leaving some countries vulnerable to increase in tobacco consumption
Two studies published in the British Medical Journal show there is no statistical evidence that global cigarette consumption has fallen as a result of the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, and in low-and-middle-income countries it has actually increased, according to two studies led by global health researchers at York University. (2019-06-20)

"Save Your Face - Drink Sensibly" - Assault And Alcohol Major Causes Of Facial Injury
Assault and alcohol consumption are the two major factors responsible for serious facial injuries in young adults. One half of the facial injuries in the 15 - 25 year age group were sustained in assaults, usually in bars or streets, and were associated with alcohol consumption. From 1977 to 1987 the proportion of patients with facial injuries sustained in road accidents fell by 34 per cent, but violent crime has more than compensated for this decrease. (1998-01-30)

Ethnic differences in need for heart pacemakers may have genetic link
Evidence suggests South Asian people are less likely to require a pacemaker for abnormally low heart rate than white people of European origin. (2018-03-01)

World still 'grossly underprepared' for infectious disease outbreaks
The world remains 'grossly underprepared' for outbreaks of infectious disease, which are likely to become more frequent in the coming decades, warn a team of international experts in The BMJ today. (2017-01-23)

Investigation raises concerns over poor quality, lack of regulation, and misrepresentation of animal research
An investigation published by The BMJ today has unearthed concerns about how researchers misrepresented the results of animal studies to gain funding and approval for human trials to test a new tuberculosis vaccine. (2018-01-10)

Systematic review of clinical studies suggests newer shingles vaccine far more effective
A systematic review of clinical studies involving more than two million patients aged 50 years and older suggests the newer shingles vaccine Shingrix was far more successful in preventing the painful condition compared to the older vaccine Zostavax. (2018-10-25)

Man develops severe liver damage after taking epsom salts
A 38-year-old man developed serious liver damage after taking epsom salts to treat gallstones, reveal doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports. (2017-10-02)

Mothers who follow five healthy habits may reduce risk of obesity in children
Children and adolescents whose mothers follow five healthy habits -- eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, keeping a healthy body weight, drinking alcohol in moderation, and not smoking -- are 75 percent less likely to become obese when compared with children of mothers who did not follow any such habits, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2018-07-04)

Air pollution linked with new causes of hospital admissions
Several diseases have been linked for the first time with exposure to short-term air pollution. The associations between air pollution exposure and hospital admissions for a host of diseases remained consistent even when daily air pollution levels were below the current guideline from the World Health Organization. Air-pollution related illnesses and deaths are linked with substantial economic costs in the US. (2019-11-27)

People keep driving even when sleepy
People continue to drive even when they know they are sleepy, suggests a large study published on bmj.com today. This has important implications for public safety, say the researchers. (2006-06-22)

Many junior doctors experience bullying
Many junior doctors in the United Kingdom experience bullying during training, finds a study in this week's BMJ. (2002-04-11)

Patient race & gender are important in predicting heart attack in the emergency department
Researchers at the George Washington University published research finding that certain symptoms are more and less predictive of patients' risk for acute coronary syndrome, which includes heart attack, in patients of different gender and race. (2017-06-23)

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