Breastfeeding Current Events

Breastfeeding Current Events, Breastfeeding News Articles.
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What causes women to stop breastfeeding early?
A recent systematic literature review has investigated potential sociodemographic, physical, mental, and social factors that may cause breastfeeding mothers to stop breastfeeding before infants reach 6 months of age. (2017-06-07)

Breastfeeding: Shame if you do, shame if you don't
A new study of 63 women with varied infant feeding experiences reveals that breastfeeding mothers may feel shame if they breastfeed in public due to exposure, while those who do not breastfeed may experience shame through 'failing' to give their infant the 'best start.' (2014-11-04)

Breastfeeding difficulties may increase risk of postnatal depression
In a recent study, stopping breastfeeding due to pain or physical difficulties predicted an increased risk of postnatal depression, but stopping for other reasons, such as social reasons or embarrassment, did not. (2015-10-23)

Facebook flack regarding breastfeeding mothers
The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine feels that the social networking website, Facebook, would be well-advised to review its policy banning photographs of breastfeeding mothers. (2009-01-12)

Optimal breastfeeding practices may help save infants' lives
In a new review of all relevant medical research on breastfeeding practices, infants 0 to 5 months of age who were predominantly, partially, or not breastfed had 1.5-, 4.8-, and 14.4-times higher risks of dying, respectively, compared with exclusively breastfed infants. (2015-08-25)

Where infants sleep may affect how long they are breastfed
A new study indicates that mothers who frequently sleep, or bed-share, with their infants consistently breastfeed for longer than mothers who do not bed-share. (2016-02-05)

Breast-feeding peer support services are lacking in many UK regions
Peer support is recommended by the World Health Organization for the initiation and continuation of breastfeeding, but in a survey of 136 service managers with jobs related to infant feeding across UK NHS Trust and Health Board areas, breastfeeding peer supporters were available in only 56 percent of NHS areas. (2017-07-07)

Breastfeeding for less than 3 months may affect a child's intelligence
Breastfeeding for less than 3 months may affect a child's intellectual development, with these children more likely to score below average for mental skills at 13 months and total intelligence at 5 years than children breastfed for six months or more. (2001-08-21)

Personality may affect a new mother's decision to breastfeed
A new analysis has found that mothers who are more extroverted and less anxious are more likely to breastfeed and to continue to breastfeed than mothers who are introverted or anxious. Published early online in the Journal of Advanced Nursing, the study indicates that new mothers with certain personalities may need additional support and education to help them feel confident, self assured, and knowledgeable about breastfeeding. (2013-08-06)

New study shows epidural during birth may negatively affect breastfeeding
Epidurals given during labour and birth are associated with decreased rates of breastfeeding, both in the short and long term. A large study of Australian women, published today in the open access journal International Breastfeeding Journal, found that women who had epidurals during childbirth were more likely to have breastfeeding problems in the first week and to give up breastfeeding before six months, compared with women who had no analgesia. (2006-12-10)

Study into the booby traps of breastfeeding in the UK
Australian researchers from Queensland University of Technology are embarking on a study of mums in the United Kingdom to discover if (2010-09-15)

Black mothers cite lack of desire as top reasons for not breastfeeding
While more American mothers are breastfeeding today, non-Hispanic black/African-American women are less likely to initiate and continue breastfeeding, primarily due to a lack of desire and lack of self-efficacy, according to research presented Monday, Oct. 4, at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition in San Francisco. (2010-10-04)

Standardized breastfeeding monitoring for Germany?
On Nov. 20, 2017, the National Breastfeeding Committee at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) organized an interdisciplinary conference with participants from various areas of the health system, as well as from research and politics, with the purpose of exchanging information of the collection of breastfeeding data in Germany. In addition, the conference should point out possibilities for establishing a standardised breastfeeding monitoring system in Germany. (2017-12-21)

Low-income dads support breastfeeding
Preliminary research suggests that fathers of low-income children support breastfeeding but are unsure how to influence or help their child's mother (their partner) with breastfeeding, according to new research presented Monday, Oct. 17, at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition in Boston. (2011-10-17)

Even part-time work can have a negative effect on breastfeeding rates, says new study
Part-time and casual work among new mothers has almost as big a negative impact on breastfeeding rates as returning to work full-time, says a new study led by the University of Melbourne. (2008-04-27)

McGill study links breastfeeding to increased intelligence
The largest randomized study of breastfeeding ever conducted reports that breastfeeding raises children's IQs, and improves their academic performance, a McGill researcher and his team have found. (2008-05-05)

Why mothers in underserved populations stop breastfeeding
A Yale study shows that most mothers in underserved populations stop breastfeeding far short of the recommended first year of life because they lack confidence in continuing beyond a few months. A large number also believe their infants prefer formula. (2001-04-24)

Breastfeeding may help prevent children's asthma exacerbations later in life
In a Pediatric Allergy and Immunology analysis of children with asthma, those who had been breastfed had a 45 percent lower risk of asthma exacerbations later in life compared with children who had not been breastfed. (2017-09-01)

Breastfeeding does not protect children against asthma and allergies
The effect of breastfeeding on the risk of developing asthma and allergy has been debated for a long time. In a recent study, Uppsala University researchers show that breastfeeding might in fact increase the risk of developing hay fever and eczema, while not having any clear effect on the risk of asthma. The results have been published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. (2017-11-13)

Breastfeeding tied to stronger maternal response to baby's cry
A new study from the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry finds that mothers who feed their babies breast milk exclusively, as opposed to formula, are more likely to bond emotionally with their child during the first few months after delivery. The breastfeeding mothers surveyed for the study showed greater responses to their infant's cry in brain regions related to caregiving behavior and empathy than mothers who relied upon formula as the baby's main food source. (2011-04-20)

Breastfeeding and risks of allergies and asthma
In an Acta Paediatrica study, exclusive breastfeeding for the first 3 months was linked with a lower risk of respiratory allergies and asthma when children reached 6 years of age. (2020-03-04)

Health benefits of training mothers in developing countries to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months
Reducing diarrhoeal disease among infants in less-developed countries could be assisted by the imple-mentation of straightforward community-based health programmes to promote exclusive breastfeeding for six months after childbirth, conclude authors of a study in the April 26th issue of The Lancet. (2003-04-24)

Breastfeeding decreases infant mortality
Data analyzed by scientists at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences suggest that breastfeeding can reduce the risk of death for infants in their first year of life. Looking at infants between 28 days and one year of age, researchers concluded that promoting breastfeeding can potentially prevent up to 720 postneonatal deaths in the U.S. each year. (2004-05-02)

Breastfeeding reduces infectious disease infant mortality
The observation of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 through breastfeeding has resulted in policies that recommend avoidance of breastfeeding by some HIV-1 infected women. Now, an international team of scientists, coordinated by the World Health Organization and the Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil, has found that breastfed infants had a six-fold reduction in death due to infectious diseases in the first few months of life than children who were not breastfed. (2000-02-02)

Proof that antidepressants and breastfeeding can mix
Researchers have found that women on antidepressants are more successful at breastfeeding their babies if they keep taking the medication. (2014-04-10)

Breast feeding rates in Scottish mothers improve but will fail to hit Government targets
In 1994 the Scottish Office set a target that by 2005, half of all mothers should still be breastfeeding when their babies are six weeks old. A paper in this week's BMJ by Tappin and colleagues shows that breastfeeding at seven days has increased by 6.4 per cent between 1990-1 to 1997-8. (2001-05-31)

Breastfeeding does not protect children against developing asthma or allergies
Breastfeeding exclusively or for a prolonged period does not protect children against developing asthma and allergies, according to the results of a large randomized trial published online today. (2007-09-11)

Manual breast milk expression better than breast pump for poor feeders
Expressing breast milk by hand in the first days after birth is better for boosting breastfeeding rates among poorly feeding newborns than the use of a breast pump, indicates a small study published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2011-07-18)

Victims of violence stop breastfeeding sooner
One in four women who have been victims of violence as adults are at risk of stopping breastfeeding before their baby is four months old. (2016-03-09)

New moms moving toward the bottle
New moms are increasingly using expressed breast milk (either pumped or expressed by hand) instead of directly breastfeeding their babies, according to a UBC study. The study also found that moms who use expressed breast milk typically transition their babies to infant formula feeding sooner than their breastfeeding peers, a trend that may impact the health of our next generation. (2016-12-07)

Breastfeeding reduces long-term risk of heart disease in mothers
Women who breastfed their babies are less likely to develop heart disease later in life, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019. The study also suggests that the protective effect on heart health is increased in women who breastfed for longer periods of time. These findings provide further evidence for the long-term health benefits of breastfeeding and that women should be encouraged to do so when possible. (2019-05-18)

New study questions role of breast milk in obesity prevention
A new study supports human milk as the optimal first food for babies, but the study raises questions about whether breast milk protects children from becoming obese. (2015-04-07)

'Breastfeeding gap' exists among Mexican-origin women living in Texas
Mexican women born and educated in Mexico who now live in Texas breastfeed longer than those born and educated in the United States. That's the finding from new research from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TxPEP) at The University of Texas at Austin, which points to a 'breastfeeding gap' among some Mexican-origin women living in Texas. (2020-03-18)

Breastfeeding study shows need for effective peer counseling programs
The support of peer groups and clinicians is critical to the development of effective breastfeeding programs, according to recent University of Georgia research. A qualitative study of 21 mothers in the Athens-Clarke County area determined that role models for successful breastfeeding help positively shape the outcomes of mothers of infants. (2014-08-28)

New study indicates early-term infants can succeed at breastfeeding
Researchers have determined that healthy premature babies can have as much success breastfeeding as full-term babies. The study, conducted by researchers at UBC Okanagan's School of Nursing and the University of Hong Kong, involved 2,700 pairs of mothers and infants and included two different survey groups -- one in 2006/07 and another in 2011/12. The mother-infant pairs were monitored from birth to 12 months or until breastfeeding ceased. (2019-02-27)

Engaging Islamic religious leaders to improve AA Muslim women's attitudes towards breastfeeding
While research has demonstrated the positive impact a woman's social support network and faith community can have on influencing decisions to breastfeed, little is known regarding the influence of Islamic traditions on the breastfeeding beliefs and practices of African American Muslims. (2017-07-20)

Bedsharing associated with longer breastfeeding, study warns of bedsharing risk
Frequent bedsharing between a mother and infant was associated with longer duration of breastfeeding, but researchers warned of the risk of sudden infant death syndrome associated with bedsharing, in a study by Yi Huang, Ph.D., of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and colleagues. (2013-09-23)

Breastfeeding associated with lower risk of childhood obesity
Authors of a research letter in this week's issue of THE LANCET conclude that breastfed infants could have a 30% reduced risk of childhood obesity compared with children who were given formula milk in infancy. (2002-06-06)

Long-term breastfeeding sheds light on whether an infant becomes right- or left-handed
Bottle feeding infants is associated with left-handedness, according to a new study from the University of Washington. (2019-01-07)

Rush University Medical Center hosts conference examining Chicago breastfeeding rates
Over 100 certified breastfeeding peer counselors, lactation consultants, nurses, physicians, dietitians and community health workers are expected to gather at Rush University Medical Center on Thursday, Aug. 6, from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. in Room 500 at 1725 W. Harrison Street, Chicago, to attend the Griffin Inaugural Conference on Breastfeeding: The Primary Foundation for Health. (2009-08-04)

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