Carbon Nanotubes Current Events

Carbon Nanotubes Current Events, Carbon Nanotubes News Articles.
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Nanotubes could pose health risk to production line staff, study suggests
Tiny fibers used to strengthen everyday products such as bicycle frames and hockey sticks could pose health hazards to those involved in their manufacture. Certain types of carbon nanotubes -- cylindrical molecules about one-thousandth of the width of a human hair -- could cause cancer in the lining of the lung, University of Edinburgh researchers have found. (2011-06-14)

Scientists untangle nanotubes to release their potential in the electronics industry
Researchers have demonstrated how to produce electronic inks for the development of new applications using the 'wonder material', carbon nanotubes. (2013-10-21)

Stirring research provides recipe for nanotube success
In a set of experiments reported in the Jan. 30 Physical Review Letters, NIST reseachers provide insights into how to manufacture polymers that contain nanotubes more efficiently. In recent years, these tubes of graphite many times thinner than a human hair have become a much-touted emerging technology because of their potential ability to add strength and other important properties to materials. (2004-01-30)

Researchers make breakthrough in the production of double-walled carbon nanotubes
In recent years, the possible applications for double-walled carbon nanotubes have excited scientists and engineers, particularly those working on developing renewable energy technologies. These tiny tubes, just two carbon atoms thick, are thin enough to be transparent, yet can still conduct electricity. This combination makes them well-suited for advanced solar panels, sensors and a host of other applications (2008-12-22)

Amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes act as a carrier for nerve growth factor
Amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes act as a carrier for nerve growth factor. (2014-04-21)

Researchers devise new means for creating elastic conductors
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new method for creating elastic conductors made of carbon nanotubes, which will contribute to large-scale production of the material for use in a new generation of elastic electronic devices. (2012-01-24)

Laser applications heat up for carbon nanotubes
Carbon nanotubes---a hot nanotechnology with many potential uses---may find one of its quickest applications in the next generation of standards for optical power measurements, which are essential for laser systems used in manufacturing, medicine, communications, lithography, space-based sensors and other technologies.As described in a forthcoming paper in Applied Optics,* scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have made prototype pyroelectric detectors coated with carbon nanotubes. (2005-01-26)

Nanotechnology may lead to more energy-efficient electronics
Carbon nanotubes and graphene consist of just a couple of layers of carbon atoms, but they are lighter than aluminum, stronger than steel and can bend like spring-coils. Physicist Niklas Lindahl at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, has been studying the unique properties of the materials, which in future may result in improved electronics and light, strong material. (2012-02-13)

Faster computers with nanotechnology
The silicon transistors in your computer may be replaced in ten years by transistors based on carbon nanotubes. This is what scientists at the University of Gothenburg are hoping -- they have developed a method to control the nanotubes during production. (2010-05-31)

Taming carbon nanotubes
Carbon nanotubes have many attractive properties, and their structure and areas of application can be compared with those of graphene, the material for whose discovery the most recent Nobel Prize was awarded. In order to be able to exploit these properties, however, it is necessary to have full control of the manufacturing process. Scientists at the University of Gothenburg are closing in on the answer. (2011-02-07)

Boston College Researchers discover 2 early stages of carbon nanotube growth
Orderly rows of neatly aligned carbon nanotubes have served as the standard for nanotechnology researchers. But two Boston College physicists report in the journal Nanotechnology the discovery of two early stages of carbon nanotube growth that produce tangled or semi-aligned tubes with characteristics that could lend themselves to thermal management and other applications. (2011-10-03)

Carbon nanotubes twice as strong as once thought
Carbon nanotubes -- those tiny particles poised to revolutionize electronics, medicine, and other areas -- are much bigger in the strength department than anyone ever thought, scientists are reporting. New studies on the strength of these submicroscopic cylinders of carbon indicate that on an ounce-for-ounce basis they are at least 117 times stronger than steel and 30 times stronger than Kevlar, the material used in bulletproof vests and other products. The findings appear in the monthly journal ACS Nano. (2010-09-15)

Spin control: New technique sorts nanotubes by length
Researchers at NIST have reported a new technique to sort batches of carbon nanotubes by length using high-speed centrifuges. The technique should be easy to scale to industrial quantities for a variety of nanotube applications where length is an important factor. (2008-05-16)

High power supercapacitors from carbon nanotubes
Supercapacitors that can deliver a strong surge of electrical power could be manufactured from carbon nanotubes using a technique developed by researchers at UC Davis. (2005-02-14)

Nanotube composites increase the efficiency of next generation of solar cells
Carbon nanotubes are becoming increasingly attractive for photovoltaic solar cells as a replacement to silicon. Researchers at Umea University in Sweden have discovered that controlled placement of the carbon nanotubes into nano-structures produces a huge boost in electronic performance. Their groundbreaking results are published in the prestigious journal Advanced Materials. (2014-03-18)

Ceramics reinforced with nanotubes
A ceramic material reinforced with carbon nanotubes has been made by materials scientists at UC Davis. The new material is far tougher than conventional ceramics, conducts electricity and can both conduct heat and act as a thermal barrier, depending on the orientation of the nanotubes. (2003-09-16)

New chemical process can separate, manipulate carbon nanotubes
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and at Rice University have discovered a way to chemically select and separate carbon nanotubes based on their electronic structure. The new process also represents a fundamental shift in the way scientists think about the chemistry of nanotubes. (2003-09-11)

Countdown to zero: New 'zero-dimensional' carbon nanotube may lead to superthin electronics and synt
Synthetic, man-made cells and ultrathin electronics built from a new form of 'zero-dimensional' carbon nanotube may be possible through research at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering. The research was published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2013-12-10)

Carbon nanotube forest camouflages 3-D objects
Researchers demonstrate that a carbon nanotube coating can absorb light nearly perfectly, making structural details disappear into a black background. (2011-11-21)

Skoltech scientists run a 'speed test' to boost production of carbon nanotubes
Skoltech researchers have investigated the procedure for catalyst delivery used in the most common method of carbon nanotube production, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), offering what they call a ''simple and elegant'' way to boost productivity and pave the way for cheaper and more accessible nanotube-based technology. (2020-12-01)

UF researchers look for ways to make an emerging technology safe for environment
The percentage of electronic waste occupying our landfills has grown at an alarming rate over the last decade, giving rise to concerns about the toxicity of components used in consumer electronics. (2012-03-21)

Neural networks will help manufacture carbon nanotubes
A team of scientists from Skoltech's Laboratory of Nanomaterials proposed a neural-network-based method for monitoring the growth of carbon nanotubes, preparing the ground for a new generation of sophisticated electronic devices. The results of the study were published in Carbon Journal. (2019-08-08)

'Few-walled' carbon nanotubes said cheap and efficient option for certain applications
North Carolina scientists have found that (2005-03-16)

USC scientists 'clone' carbon nanotubes to unlock their potential for use in electronics
Scientists have developed a method of (2012-11-14)

The presence of oxygen on carbon nanotubes enhances interaction with ammonia
Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which could play an important role in developing sensors against chemical threats, have enhanced interaction with ammonia because of the presence of oxygen groups on the nanotubes, researchers at Temple University have discovered. (2005-07-11)

Accidental nanoparticle discovery could hail revolution in manufacturing
A nanoparticle shaped like a spiky ball, with magnetic properties, has been uncovered in a new method of synthesising carbon nanotubes by physicists at Queen Mary University of London and the University of Kent. (2013-09-09)

Method could help carbon nanotubes become commercially viable
Carbon nanotubes are intriguing new materials, but a fundamental problem relating to their synthesis has limited their widespread commercial use. Current methods for synthesizing the materials produce mixtures of tubes that differ in their diameter and twist. Now Northwestern University researchers have developed a new method for sorting single-walled carbon nanotubes. The method works by exploiting subtle differences in the buoyant densities of carbon nanotubes as a function of their size and electronic behavior. (2006-10-04)

LLNL researchers peer into water in carbon nanotubes
Researchers have identified a signature for water inside single-walled carbon nanotubes, helping them understand how water is structured and how it moves within these tiny channels. (2008-06-25)

Water purification down the nanotubes
Nanotechnology could be the answer to ensuring a safe supply of drinking water for regions of the world stricken by periodic drought or where water contamination is rife. Writing in the International Journal of Nuclear Desalination, researchers in India explain how carbon nanotubes could replace conventional materials in water-purification systems. (2008-09-15)

Efficient, interconnected, stable: New carbon nanotubes to grow neurons
Carbon nanotubes able to take on the desired shapes thanks to a special chemical treatment, called crosslinking and, at the same time, able to function as substrata for the growth of nerve cells, finely tuning their growth and activity. The research is a new and important step towards the construction of neuronal regenerative-interfaces to repair spinal injuries (2019-08-02)

Good vibrations in the nanoworld
Accessing vibrational modes of molecular chains at the site of a specific atom in molecules is no longer a dream. Using a scanning tunneling microscopy technique, the vibrational modes of carbon nanotubes have been mapped with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. This allows the study of the role of local defects and demonstrates the crucial importance of nanotubes for the electronic and mechanical properties of nanotubes. (2004-09-28)

OU researchers develop novel, non-invasive cancer therapy
A staggering 1.7 million persons in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer in 2016, with 600,000 cases ending in death. University of Oklahoma researchers have collaborated to design a novel, non-invasive cancer therapy that could eliminate tumors without affecting the healthy cells in the body. (2016-10-17)

Using nanotechnology to create high-performance materials
The polymer researchers at the GKSS Research Centre in Geesthacht expected about 30 scientists to attend the kick-off meeting of the new EU project HARCANA. New kinds of plastic-based nanocomposites could be used to develop lightweight materials that would increase the mechanical stability of materials and add electrical or magnetic properties, for example. (2008-07-22)

Carbon nanotubes boost cancer-fighting cells
Yale University engineers have found that the defects in carbon nanotubes cause T cell antigens to cluster in the blood and stimulate the body's natural immune response. Their findings, which appear as the cover article of the April 20 issue of the journal Langmuir, could improve current adoptive immunotherapy, a treatment used to boost the body's ability to fight cancer. (2010-04-20)

Carbon nanotube avalanche process nearly doubles current
By pushing carbon nanotubes close to their breaking point, researchers at the University of Illinois have demonstrated a remarkable increase in the current-carrying capacity of the nanotubes, well beyond what was previously thought possible. (2009-02-09)

Research shows old newspapers can be used to grow carbon nanotubes
New research has found that old newspaper provide a cheap and green solution for the bulk production of single walled carbon nanotubes. (2019-11-22)

Making carbon nanotubes as usable as common plastics
By using an inexpensive, already mass produced, simple solvent called cresol, Northwestern University's Jiaxing Huang has discovered a way to make disperse carbon nanotubes at unprecedentedly high concentrations without the need for additives or harsh chemical reactions to modify the nanotubes. In a surprising twist, Huang also found that as the nanotubes' concentrations increase, the material transitions from a dilute dispersion to a thick paste, then a free-standing gel and finally a kneadable dough that can be shaped and molded. (2018-05-15)

Penn researchers take a big step forward in making smaller circuits
In the race to take advantage of the amazing electric properties of nanotubes, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania developed a new method to create functional nanotube circuits. The physicists overcame some of hurdles of working with nanotubes - particularly their size - by dipping semiconductor chips into liquid suspensions of carbon nanotubes. Their findings represent a big step toward creating things like nanoscale chemical sensors, flexible electronics and high-density microprocessors. (2005-07-29)

Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
Enhanced single-walled carbon nanotubes offer a more effective and sustainable approach to water treatment and remediation than the standard industry materials -- silicon gels and activated carbon -- according to a paper by RIT researchers John-David Rocha and Reginald Rogers. (2017-03-29)

McMaster researchers resolve a problem that has been holding back a technological revolution
Researchers at McMaster University have cleared that obstacle by developing a new way to purify carbon nanotubes -- the smaller, nimbler semiconductors that are expected to replace silicon within computer chips and a wide array of electronics. (2016-08-16)

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