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Cardiovascular Disease Current Events

Cardiovascular Disease Current Events, Cardiovascular Disease News Articles.
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Study highlights benefits of screening for heart disease in men with erectile dysfunction
New research reveals that screening for cardiovascular disease in men presenting with erectile dysfunction may be a cost-effective intervention for preventing both cardiovascular disease and, over the longer term, erectile dysfunction. (2015-03-02)
Study examines impact of global food consumption on heart disease
More than 80 percent of cardiovascular disease deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, but very little data on the impact of diet on cardiovascular disease exists from these countries. (2015-09-28)
Psoriasis linked with need for cardiovascular interventions in patients with hypertension
Psoriasis is linked with increased risks of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, but its effect on the course of cardiovascular disease remains unknown. (2018-10-17)
Research links erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease
Preliminary findings from clinicians at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), show that men with erectile dysfunction are more likely to have cardiovascular disease. (2003-04-29)
Fatty liver disease contributes to cardiovascular disease and vice versa
For the first time, researchers have shown that a bi-directional relationship exists between fatty liver disease and cardiovascular disease. (2016-11-10)
Renu Virmani, M.D. presented with 2012 TCT Career Achievement Award
Renu Virmani, M.D., an internationally renowned cardiovascular pathologist, was presented the 2012 TCT Career Achievement Award in a ceremony held today during the 24th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics scientific symposium, sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation. (2012-10-26)
Cardiovascular disease costs UK economy £29 billion a year
Cardiovascular disease costs the UK economy £29 billion a year in healthcare expenditure and lost productivity, reveals research published ahead of print in the journal Heart. (2006-05-14)
New research: Eyes of adolescents could reveal risk of cardiovascular disease
New research has found that poorer well-being or 'health-related quality of life' (HRQoL) in adolescence could be an indicator of future cardiovascular disease risk. (2018-04-19)
Study finds low statin use among some high-risk kidney disease patients
Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in kidney disease patients who are not on dialysis. (2019-02-18)
Long-term declines in heart disease and stroke deaths are stalling, research finds
Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries, including Australia, and are even increasing in some countries, according to new research. (2019-08-04)
Healthy living adds 14 years to your life
If you have optimal heart health in middle age, you may live up to 14 years longer, free of cardiovascular disease, than your peers who have two or more cardiovascular disease risk factors, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. (2012-11-05)
Beneficial effect of dietary change on heart disease can take two years
The theory that dietary fat causes heart disease remains central to (2001-03-29)
Similar long-term mortality risks in men with type 2 diabetes and men with cardiovascular disease
Men with type 2 diabetes and men with previous heart attack or stroke had a 3 to 4 fold risk of cardiovascular death compared to men without either disease in the years following the first acute event, according to a study in CMAJ. (2009-01-05)
A lifestyle intervention for preventing cardiovascular disease
A standardized intervention incorporating risk assessment and telephone counselling improved cardiovascular risk factors among those at risk for coronary disease. (2007-10-08)
Hypertension during pregnancy may affect women's long-term cardiovascular health
Women who experience hypertension during pregnancy face an increased risk of heart disease and hypertension later in life, according to a new study. (2017-08-18)
Coronary heart disease is under-diagnosed and under-treated in women
Coronary heart disease is under-diagnosed, under-treated, and under-researched in women, says a senior doctor in this week's BMJ. (2005-09-01)
Science Writers Workshop
A Science Writers Workshop will be held on the topic of CARDIOVASCULAR GENETICS, 10 a.m., October 28, 1998, during the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics, Rm. (1998-10-25)
The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: 2015 ERA-EDTA Congress media alert
The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology is pleased to announce that the following paper will be published to coincide with presentation at the 52nd ERA-EDTA Congress, taking place in London, UK, May 28-31, 2015. (2015-05-29)
Corporate health program reduces employee CVD medical, hospital costs
A comprehensive health promotion program reduced cardiovascular disease-related medical and hospital costs, according to a new study. (2010-05-21)
Fish consumption may prolong life
Consumption of fish and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids was associated with lower risks of early death in a Journal of Internal Medicine study. (2018-07-18)
Cardiovascular disease leads to higher risk of dementia
People with cardiovascular disease have an elevated risk of developing dementia, including both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, according to a study being presented May 9 at the annual meeting of the American Geriatric Society in Washington, D.C. (2002-05-09)
New tests needed to predict cardiovascular problems in older people more accurately
A long-standing system for assessing the risk of cardiovascular disease amongst older people should be replaced with something more accurate, according to a study published today on bmj.com. (2009-01-08)
Family plays important role in heart health throughout life
Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and the burden is increasing -- much of which could be reduced through modifiable risk factors. (2016-04-04)
Frequent use of aspirin can lead to increased bleeding
A new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has found that taking aspirin on a regular basis to prevent heart attacks and strokes, can lead to an increase risk of almost 50 percent in major bleeding episodes. (2019-01-22)
Tooth loss associated with higher risk of heart disease
Adults who have lost teeth due to nontraumatic reasons may have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease according to a presentation at the American College of Cardiology Middle East Conference 2019 together with the 10th Emirates Cardiac Society Congress. (2019-10-03)
Eating less salt could prevent cardiovascular disease
People who significantly cut back on the amount of salt in their diet could reduce their chances of developing cardiovascular disease by a quarter, according to a report online today. (2007-04-19)
Dentists can help to identify patients at risk of a heart attack
Dentists can help to identify patients who are in danger of dying of a heart attack or stroke, reveals a new study from the Sahlgrenska Academy. (2009-11-25)
Early signs of cardiovascular disease detected in asymptomatic individuals in need of treatment
Individuals without any symptoms of cardiovascular disease may be in need of treatment, according to Jay Cohn, M.D., professor of medicine and director of the Rasmussen Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention. (2003-10-02)
Folic acid could prevent heart disease
Folic acid could dramatically reduce the risk of heart disease, deep vein thrombosis, and stroke if levels of homocysteine (an amino acid) were reduced, according to researchers in this week's BMJ. (2002-11-21)
Common painkillers linked to increased risk of heart problems
Commonly used painkillers for treating inflammation can increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes, according to an analysis of the evidence published on bmj.com today. (2011-01-11)
Testosterone predominance increases prevalence of metabolic syndrome during menopause
As testosterone progressively dominates the hormonal milieu during the menopausal transition, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome increases according to a new study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center. (2008-07-28)
South Beach Diet Developer Keynotes Cardiovascular Symposium
Dr. Arthur Agatston, pioneer of the revolutionary South Beach Diet and the best predictor of future heart attack, the Agatston Score, will be the keynote speaker Sept. (2014-09-02)
China Event: Reducing the Global Cardiovascular Disease Burden
Please join the American College of Cardiology, with the support of the United States Department of Commerce's International Trade Agency, for a discussion on the ACC's global mission to advance cardiovascular health and improve patient care. (2016-03-18)
Infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus i
Less than fifty percent of HIV-infected patients achieve viral suppression in medically underserved areas. (2016-08-03)
Osteoarthritis linked to higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have investigated the link between osteoarthritis and mortality in an epidemiological study. (2019-07-16)
Pain medications linked to higher cardiovascular risks in patients with osteoarthritis
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help to control the pain and inflammation in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA), but a new Arthritis & Rheumatology study suggests that NSAIDs contribute to cardiovascular side effects in these patients. (2019-08-07)
Depressed men with ED at risk for cardiovascular problems
A new study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine found that the presence of depressive symptoms in men with erectile dysfunction constitutes a risk factor for a major cardiovascular event. (2010-07-13)
Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention has no heart-related effects
The breast cancer prevention drug, tamoxifen, does not influence cardiovascular risk in healthy women or in women with coronary heart disease, according to a study published in the Jan. (2001-01-02)
Primary prevention could reduce heart disease among type 2 diabetes patients
In a Journal of the American College of Cardiology state of the art review published today, researchers from the division of cardiology and the Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease at the New York University Medical Center in New York City, examine evidence and guidelines for the prevention of heart disease in Type 2 Diabetes patients. (2017-08-07)
U of M study: Early treatment can reverse heart damage
University of Minnesota researchers have discovered that treating people who have early cardiovascular abnormalities, but show no symptoms of cardiovascular disease, can slow progression and even reverse damage to the heart and blood vessels. (2007-08-27)
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