Cheetah Current Events

Cheetah Current Events, Cheetah News Articles.
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Using dogs to find cats
Investigators are using specially-trained detection dogs to determine the numbers and distribution of cheetah in a region of Western Zambia. The research represents the first demonstration of this strategy for wide-ranging species that are often threatened. (2017-02-23)

Can big cats co-exist? Study challenges lion threat to cheetah cubs
New research into cheetah cub survival has refuted the theory that lions are a cub's main predator and that big cats cannot coexist in conservation areas. The study, published in the Journal of Zoology, found that cubs in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park were seven times more likely to survive then on the Serengeti Plains and that lions were not found to be the cubs' main predatory threat. (2013-12-02)

Camera trap survey snaps cheetahs in Algeria
A Wildlife Conservation Society-supported survey of the Sahara has captured the first camera-trap photographs of the critically endangered Saharan cheetah in Algeria. The survey was conducted by researchers from the Zoological Society of London, the Office du Parc National de l'Ahaggar, and the Universite de Bejaia, with support from WCS and Panthera. (2009-02-23)

A rare glimpse at the elusive Saharan cheetah
Research by scientists and conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Zoological Society of London, and other groups published today in PLOS ONE shows that critically endangered Saharan cheetahs exist at incredibly low densities and require vast areas for their conservation. The research also offers some of the world's only photographs of this elusive big cat. (2015-01-29)

Estimates of cheetah numbers are 'guesswork', say researchers
Current estimates of the number of cheetahs in the wild are 'guesswork', say the authors of a new study which finds that the population in the cheetah stronghold of Maasai Mara, Kenya, is lower than previously thought. (2016-05-03)

DNA traces evolution of extinct sabertooths and the American cheetah-like cat
By performing sequence analysis of ancient DNA, a team of researchers has obtained data that help clarify our view of the evolutionary relationships shared by the large predatory cats that once roamed the prehistoric New World. (2005-08-08)

How cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenas
Cheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in order to give them enough time to eat their fill. (2018-04-10)

Cheetahs never prosper: Energy expenditure linked to population decline
A new study from researchers in Europe, South Africa and at North Carolina State University suggests that the energy cheetahs spend looking for prey, rather than their high-speed hunting tactics or food stolen by other predators, may be to blame for their dwindling numbers. (2014-10-02)

Philandering female felines forgo fidelity
While promiscuity in the animal kingdom is generally a male thing, researchers for the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Zoological Society of London have found that, in cheetah society, it's the female with the wandering eye, as reported in a paper in the latest issue of Proceedings of the Royal Society B. (2007-05-31)

Significant litter of cheetah cubs born at Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
Five cheetah cubs were born May 28 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va. This litter is particularly significant to the Association of Zoos and Aquariums' Species Survival Plan for cheetahs because cheetah births in zoos across the country have dwindled. The SSP matches animals across the country to ensure genetic diversity in the population. This is the only litter of cheetahs born this year in a North American zoo. (2011-06-10)

Hotspots of cheetah activity is a key to solving the cheetah-farmer conflict in Namibia
New insights into the cheetah's spatial behaviour provide a viable solution to the human-wildlife conflict: In the core areas of male cheetah territories, all local males and females frequently meet to exchange information. Moving their breeding herds out of these hotspots, farmers reduced livestock losses by more than 80 percent. These insights are the result of a close cooperation between scientists from Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and farmers in central Namibia. (2020-12-07)

New NCAR, ORNL climate simulation doubles detail of previous models
Climate studies just doubled in resolution because of a new model developed and implemented by researchers at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and Oak Ridge National Laboratory and run on the Cheetah supercomputer. (2002-06-26)

Early first pregnancy is the key to successful reproduction of cheetahs in zoos
Cheetah experts in many zoos around the world are at a loss. Despite all their efforts, these cats often do not reproduce in the desired manner. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, together with colleagues from the Allwetterzoo M√ľnster, have now found a key to the issue: the age of the mothers at the first pregnancy is the decisive factor. (2019-07-09)

Southern Africa's cheetah population much smaller than believed
Populations of cheetahs in southern Africa have declined as farming and other human activities push deeper into the big cats' range, a study led by researchers at Duke University and the Claws Conservancy finds. Fewer than 3,600 adult cheetahs - 11 percent fewer than estimated in 2015 - remain in the region, which is home to the largest population of free-roaming cheetahs left on Earth. Farmer-cheetah conflicts and other human-related pressures are contributing to the decline. (2017-12-12)

Chewbaaka migrated from North America
The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is now at home on the African plains, but it started a migration 100,000 years ago from North America towards its current habitat. The research, published in the open-access journal Genome Biology, found that the migration from North America was costly for the species, triggering the first major reduction in their gene pool. (2015-12-08)

New discovery positions Smithsonian to bolster genetic diversity among cheetahs
Researchers at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute have discovered why older females are rarely able to reproduce -- and hope to use this information to introduce vital new genes into the pool. SCBI scientists and collaborating researchers analyzed hormones, eggs and the uteri of 34 cheetahs at eight institutions, and determined that while the hormones and eggs of cheetahs older than 8 years appear normal, the animals' uterine tracks tend to suffer from abnormal cell growth, infections and cysts that prevent pregnancy. (2011-08-12)

Sprinting towards extinction? Cheetah numbers crash globally
A new study led by ZSL, Panthera and WCS confirms that the iconic cheetah is sprinting towards extinction. (2016-12-26)

How cheetahs outpace greyhounds
Cheetahs are the high-performance sports cars of the animal kingdom, but how do they outstrip other elite athletes when using the same sprint technique? Penny Hudson, Sandra Corr and Alan Wilson from the Royal Veterinary College, UK, compared the performance of captive cheetahs and greyhounds and found that in addition to increasing their stride frequency, the cheetahs spend longer in contact with the ground, probably to protect their limbs from stress fractures at high speed. (2012-06-21)

In Iran, cheetahs collared for the first time
An international team of scientists led by the Wildlife Conservation Society working in Iran has successfully fitted two Asiatic cheetahs with Global Positioning System (GPS) collars, marking the first time this highly endangered population of big cats can be tracked by conservationists. (2007-03-01)

In Iran, camera traps reveal rare Asiatic cheetahs
Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) scientists, working in conjunction with Iran's Department of Environment (DOE) in an isolated region in the Dar-e Anjir Wildlife Refuge, recently discovered that a remote camera set out to survey wildlife had photographed an entire family of extremely rare Asiatic cheetahs. (2005-08-30)

Pendulums, predators and prey: The ecology of coupled oscillations
Connect one pendulum to another with a spring, and in time the motions of the two swinging levers will become coordinated. (2006-12-01)

Mini cheetah is the first four-legged robot to do a backflip
MIT's new mini cheetah robot is springy and light on its feet, with a range of motion that rivals a champion gymnast. The four-legged powerpack can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right-side up or upside down. The robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person's walking speed. (2019-03-04)

'Blind' Cheetah 3 robot can climb stairs littered with obstacles
MIT's Cheetah 3 robot can now leap and gallop across rough terrain, climb a staircase littered with debris, and quickly recover its balance when suddenly yanked or shoved, all while essentially blind. The 90-pound mechanical beast -- about the size of a full-grown Labrador -- is intentionally designed to do all this without relying on cameras or any external environmental sensors. (2018-07-05)

Even Usain Bolt can't beat greyhounds, cheetahs...or pronghorn antelope
Even Usain Bolt, currently the fastest man in the world, couldn't outpace greyhounds, cheetahs, or the pronghorn antelope, finds a light-hearted comparison of the extraordinary athleticism of humans and animals in the Veterinary Record. (2012-07-27)

Cheetahs' inner ear is one-of-a-kind, vital to high-speed hunting
The world's fastest land animal, the cheetah, is a successful hunter not only because it is quick, but also because it can hold an incredibly still gaze while pursuing prey. For the first time, researchers have investigated the cheetah's extraordinary sensory abilities by analyzing the speedy animal's inner ear, an organ that is essential for maintaining body balance and adapting head posture during movement in most vertebrates. (2018-02-02)

Guard dogs reduce killing of threatened species
Research from the University of Kent has revealed that guarding dogs can significantly reduce conflict between livestock and large carnivores, such as cheetahs or leopards, helping to reduce unwarranted killing of endangered species in South Africa. (2013-11-26)

Eye size determined by maximum running speed in mammals
Maximum running speed is the most important variable influencing mammalian eye size other than body size, according to new research from the University of Texas at Austin. (2012-05-02)

Study reveals new insight into how cheetahs catch their prey
A new research study has revealed that the cheetah, the world's fastest land animal, matches and may even anticipate the escape tactics of different prey when hunting, rather than just relying on its speed and agility, as previously thought. (2013-09-05)

Science, not romance, controls mating at Smithsonian's National Zoo
This Valentine's Day, Cupid won't be making a stop at the Smithsonian's National Zoo. Unlike the spontaneous attraction that most humans equate with love and romance, mating and dating at the National Zoo is planned, strategic and science-based -- quite an unromantic encounter. (2008-02-08)

A robot that runs like a cat
Thanks to its legs, whose design faithfully reproduces feline morphology, EPFL's four-legged (2013-06-17)

Run, cheetah, run
A new algorithm enables MIT cheetah robot to run and jump, untethered, across grass. (2014-09-15)

Humble Pocket Gophers Shed Light On The Genetic Fortitude Of Cheetahs
Conservation biologists have shown that gophers will accept skin grafts from each other. The work vindicates a controversial experiment on cheetahs from 1985. The researchers conclude that cheetahs and other genetically impoverished species may have little variability among their immune systems and may be more vulnerable to outbreaks of disease. (1996-07-22)

African wildlife databases benefit animal conservation efforts
The health and welfare of African lions, leopards and cheetahs are coming into focus - in Illinois. What is being learned, researchers say, will help with the management of the threatened big cats in Africa, as well as those in zoos throughout the world. (2001-09-28)

Leopard meals: Females go for diversity
Leopards, top predators of the African savannah, are known to feed on a variety of prey species. It has been largely unknown, however, whether they specialize in certain prey animals and which factors might influence prey preferences. Christian Voigt and his colleagues from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin investigated these questions by studying the diet of leopards on commercial farmland in central Namibia. (2018-05-08)

Scientists urge endangered listing for cheetahs
A comprehensive assessment of cheetah populations in southern Africa supported by the National Geographic Society reveals the dire state of one of the planet's most iconic big cats. In a study published today in the open-access journal PeerJ, researchers present evidence that low cheetah population estimates in southern Africa and population decline support a call to list the cheetah as 'Endangered' on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. (2017-12-11)

Leading conservation scientists awarded prestigious 2010 Tyler Environmental Prize
Two conservationists who have dedicated their lives to protect and restore endangered species from the brink of extinction and ensure their habitat remains for generations to come will share the 2010 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, one of the world's first international environmental awards to be established. Since its inception in 1973, the Tyler Prize continues to be the premier award for environmental science, environmental health and energy, given to those who confer great benefit upon humankind through environmental restoration and achievement. (2010-04-01)

Slicing proteins with Occam's Razor
Using myoglobin, physicists at the University of Vermont have developed a new way to peer into the inner workings of proteins and detect which specific atoms are at work. (2010-09-30)

Evolutionary 'selection of the fittest' measured for the first time
A difference of one hundredth of a percent in fitness is sufficient to select between winners and losers in evolution. For the first time researchers have quantified the tiny selective forces that shape bacterial genomes. The story is published today in the prestigious journal PLOS Genetics. (2016-03-10)

'Rational drug design' identifies fragments of FDA-approved drugs relevant to emerging viruses
A massive, data-crunching computer search program that matches fragments of potential drug molecules to the known shapes of viral surface proteins has identified several FDA-approved drugs that could be the basis for new medicines -- if emerging viruses such as the H5N1 (avian flu) or H1N1/09 (swine flu) develop resistance to current antiviral therapies. (2009-12-06)

The spring in your step is more than just a good mood
Scientists using a bionic boot found that during walking, the ankle does about three times the work for the same amount of energy compared to isolated muscles -- in other words, the spring in your step is very real and helps us move efficiently. (2008-04-23)

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