Coral Reefs Current Events

Coral Reefs Current Events, Coral Reefs News Articles.
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Healthy coral populations produce a surprising number of offspring
Healthy coral populations can produce up to 200 times more juvenile corals than degraded coral populations nearby, according to a new study in Conservation Letters. (2017-10-18)

Coral reefs at risk of losing building material by end of century
A new study suggests that by 2050, most coral reefs around the world are at risk of experiencing constant depletion of one of their building blocks - calcium carbonate sediments. (2018-02-22)

Are conservation efforts for coral reefs misguided?
A recent global analysis indicates that more than half of coral reefs are located less than 30 minutes from the nearest human settlement, but these reefs are receiving less protection than reefs located farther away from people. (2016-02-16)

Interdisciplinary coral bleaching research funded
Dr. Semen Koksal, associate professor of mathematical sciences, has earned the university's first interdisciplinary grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The $97,168 grant will fund her work on the coral bleaching problem, which she will undertake with Dr. Robert van Woesik. A Florida Tech professor of biological sciences, van Woesik is also an internationally recognized authority on coral reefs and coral bleaching. (2003-09-30)

Researchers provide new insights on coral bleaching
Reef-building corals have a symbiotic relationship with Symbiodinium algae, and environmental stressors that cause algae to be expelled from reefs can give rise to the phenomenon known as coral bleaching. (2016-06-22)

Marine reserves are critical for coral reef resilience
Due to the combined effect of human and natural disturbances, coral reefs are declining at an alarming rate. (2016-04-07)

Biodiversity hotspots, centres of endemicity, and the conservation of coral reefs
Coral reefs are renowned for their spectacularly high biodiversity, yet there is widespread concern for their future in the face of threats from land-clearing, over-fishing and global warming. A new study published in Ecology Letters has shown that biodiversity hotspots on coral reefs are not driven by local concentrations of small-range specialists (endemics). (2002-10-30)

Ocean skeletons reveal historical climate impacts
Researchers studied skeletal stress bands on corals to reconstruct the history of bleaching on eight reefs in the central equatorial Pacific and use this information to better understand the thermal thresholds of their coral communities. (2019-05-16)

Exploring the future of our coral reefs
The current condition and future prospects of the world's coral reefs will be in the spotlight at a symposium of leading marine scientists in Townsville on 10-11 October 2013. Coral Reefs in the 21st Century will present the latest research, management and policy developments in coral reef systems in Australia, our region, and globally. It will feature talks by more than 30 eminent coral reef and fish scientists on these vital marine ecosystems. (2013-10-02)

Fishing kills Fijian coral reefs
Outbreaks of coral-eating starfish have occurred in Fiji resulting from overexploitation of the predatory fishes that normally limit its numbers. The impacts of the starfish are dramatic, with previously pristine coral reefs being turned into dull algal mats. In the May issue of Ecology Letters Dulvy, Freckleton and Polunin found that light levels of exploitation by subsistence islanders fishing just for food for themselves and their families could cause such profound changes. (2004-05-04)

9th International Coral Reef Symposium in Bali, Indonesia on October 22nd to 27th
The 9th International Coral Reef Symposium is taking place October 22nd to 27th in Bali, Indonesia. This world summit on coral reef science and issues, held every four years, is sponsored by the International Society for Coral Reef Studies. It is the primary vehicle used by experts, including scientists, policy makers, resource managers, and conservationists for providing new data and news concerning the state and health of coral reef ecosystems around the world. (2000-10-17)

Billions of plastic items are sickening coral reefs
A new study estimates that 11.1 billion plastic items are lodged along coral reefs across the Asia-Pacific, and that their presence increases the risk of coral disease from 4 to 89 percent, in some cases. (2018-01-25)

No refuge in the deep for shallow reef ecosystems
Deep water coral reefs are not the places of refuge for shallow reef organisms that some scientists have considered them to be, a new report suggests. (2018-07-19)

Algal contact as a trigger for coral disease
Infectious disease epidemics are causing widespread and alarming declines in reef-building coral species, the foundation blocks of coral reef ecosystems. (2004-09-17)

Fishing for the future of coral reefs
New fishery regulations based on science are needed in the Caribbean to give coral reefs a fighting chance against climate change, according to an international study published today. (2016-04-04)

Biodiversity and resilience of coral reefs
Indo-Pacific coral reefs incorporate diverse ecosystems but changes in ecosystem function on coral reefs at regional biogeographical scales as a result of overfishing of the parrotfish. Each parrotfish ingests over 5 tonnes of structural reef carbonates per year. Human activity and ecosystem disruption are strongly correlated, regardless of local fish biodiversity. The results emphasize the functional role of species when formulating management strategies and the potential weakness of the link between biodiversity and ecosystem resilience. (2003-04-08)

Nutrient pollution can exacerbate coral disease outbreaks and threatens coral reef health
Wildlife diseases are one of the primary threats to coral reefs and other endangered marine ecosystems. Little is know about the factors that promote marine diseases, but it is suspected that human activities have altered the environment, subsequently promoting disease epidemics and coral die offs. In Ecology Letters, December, Bruno et al report that nutrient pollution can increase the severity of coral diseases by facilitating disease spread. (2003-11-24)

'Geology' September 05 cover story: Coral reef decline - not just overfishing
Scientists widely agree that coral reefs are in declining. As featured in Geology in its September 2005 issue, a team led by Richard Aronson of the Dauphin Island Sea Lab took cores of reefs in Belize that reconstructed their history over the past several thousand years and found that they were healthy and vibrant until the 1980's when they were killed by disease and high sea temperatures. This dictates a different strategy for policymakers intent on saving reef ecosystems than just focusing on overfishing. (2005-08-24)

'Geological Approaches to Coral Reef Ecology'
Coral reefs around the world are sustaining massive damage at an alarming rate. (2007-01-05)

Strange coral spawning improving Great Barrier Reef's resilience
A phenomenon that makes coral spawn more than once a year is improving the resilience of the Great Barrier Reef. The discovery was made by University of Queensland and CSIRO researchers investigating whether corals that split their spawning over multiple months are more successful at spreading their offspring across different reefs. (2019-08-06)

Marine protected areas not sufficient to protect global biodiversity
Research undertaken at The University of Auckland, and published in the prestigious USA journal Science, shows that the protection of marine habitats is ineffectively managed worldwide to retain biodiversity, and that many so-called (2006-06-22)

Death and resurrection on Caribbean reefs
Caribbean coral reefs are deteriorating rapidly, according to a new study published in Ecology Letters, April. Researchers analyzed cores to reconstruct the ecological history of a reef system in Jamaica, finding an unprecedented decline of coral in recent decades. They extracted cores from the reefs that represent timelines of reef history. By identifying and analyzing the condition of the fossil corals, they were able to piece together the changes that occurred over the last millennium. (2004-03-18)

Coral reefs serve as records for reconstructing climate and storm patterns
A recent study of coral formations in different tropical locations will be used to help geologists reconstruct climate and storm patterns of the past and to learn more about reef preservation. (2002-10-29)

Coral reefs: Centuries of human impact
In her AAAS talk, ASU researcher Katie Cramer outlines the evidence of the long-ago human footprints that set the stage for the recent coral reef die-offs we are witnessing today. Her studies have examined the origins of Caribbean coral reef declines by tracking changes over the past 3,000 years in the composition of a variety of fossils found in reef sediment cores she collected from Panama, including coral skeletons, fish teeth, urchin spines, mollusk shells, and others. (2020-02-14)

Uncovering the hidden life of 'dead' coral reefs
'Dead' coral rubble can support more animals than live coral, according to University of Queensland researchers trialling a high-tech sampling method. UQ's Dr Kenny Wolfe said that reef rubble habitat was often overlooked as desolate, unattractive and 'dead', however reef rubble was very much alive. (2020-08-31)

Coral transplantation the simple and cheap solution to reef restoration
It is a question asked by marine scientists from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Barrier Reef; how best to restore coral reefs and marine habitat once it has been damaged or even killed? Now research published in Restoration Ecology reveals how (2010-06-03)

Good bacteria vital to coral reef survival
Scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University and University of Hawaii say good bacteria could be the key to keeping coral healthy, able to withstand the impacts of global warming and to secure the long term survival of reefs worldwide. (2016-06-23)

The cement for coral reefs
Coral reefs are hotspots of biodiversity. As they can withstand heavy storms, they offer many species a safe home. A team of researchers from Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the University of Bayreuth have now discovered that a very specific type of 'cement' is responsible for the stability of coral reefs - by forming a hard calcareous skeleton, coralline red algae stabilise the reefs, and have been doing so for at least 150 million years. (2020-11-03)

18th century nautical charts document historic loss of coral reefs
Researchers studying 18th century British nautical charts tracked the loss of coral reef habitat in the Florida Keys over the last two centuries. According to their analysis, entire sections of reef near the shore that were present prior to European settlement are now largely gone. (2017-09-06)

'Coral Disease Handbook: Guidelines for Assessment, Monitoring and Management'
University of Guam Associate Professor Laurie Raymundo is senior editor and co-author of a new book on the etiology and management of coral diseases, (2009-05-05)

Coral death stops fish from learning predators
In a world first study researchers have found that coral bleaching and death can have dramatic repercussions for how small reef fish learn about and avoid predators. The new results are published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. (2016-05-10)

'Twilight Zone' could help preserve shallow water reefs
Corals lurking in deeper, darker waters could one day help to replenish shallow water reefs under threat from ocean warming and bleaching events, according to researchers. The University of Queensland and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies examined corals from the ocean's 'twilight zone' at depths below 30 metres. (2019-02-06)

Corals stay close to home
New DNA analysis reveals that corals are more closely related than previously thought, and these results have significant implications for coral conservation. (2009-06-26)

Coral bleaching causes a permanent change in fish life
Repeat coral bleaching caused by rising sea temperatures has resulted in lasting changes to fish communities, according to a new long-term study in the Seychelles. (2019-06-18)

Location and extent of coral reefs mapped worldwide using advanced AI
researchers from the Arizona State University Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science have generated a global coral reef extent map using a single methodology capable of predicting the location of shallow coral reefs with nearly 90% accuracy. (2020-10-28)

Coral bleaching 'lifeboat' could be just beneath the surface
A report commissioned by the United Nations offers a glimmer of hope to those managing the impact of bleaching on the world's coral reefs, including the Great Barrier Reef. The 35 authors of the United Nations Environmental Programme in-depth report say as the world's surface reefs are being threatened, part of the ecosystem may survive in these barely known deeper environments, known as mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs). (2016-05-24)

Deep reefs unlikely to save shallow coral reefs
Often highlighted as important ecological refuges, deep sections of coral reefs (30-60 m depth) can offer protection from the full force of climate change-related impacts, such as intensifying storms and warm-water bleaching. However new research questions their role in acting as a source of new corals for damaged shallow reefs. (2017-02-15)

New coral bleaching database to help predict fate of global reefs
A UBC-led research team has developed a new global coral bleaching database that could help scientists predict future bleaching events. The new database contains 79 percent more reports than previous, widely used voluntary databases. (2017-05-01)

Scientists highlight the importance of nutrients for coral reefs
A new publication from researchers at the University of Southampton and the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, highlights the importance of nutrients for coral reef survival. (2014-02-27)

Under climate change, winners and losers on the coral reef
As ocean temperatures rise, some species of corals are likely to succeed at the expense of others, according to a report published online on April 12 in the Cell Press journal Current Biology that details the first large-scale investigation of climate effects on corals. (2012-04-12)

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