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Study assesses shark attacks on Atlantic spotted dolphins near the Bahamas
A Marine Mammal Science analysis on failed shark attacks on the approximately 120 Atlantic spotted dolphins that are residents of the waters near Bimini, The Bahamas, has found that a total of 14 dolphins (15 percent of 92 cataloged animals) showed some sign of shark attack, and a further 15 (16 percent) exhibited scars that could not conclusively be classified as shark induced or not. (2014-08-04)
Dolphins tear up nets as fish numbers fall
Fishing nets suffer six times more damage when dolphins are around - and overfishing is forcing dolphins and fishermen ever closer together, new research shows. (2018-03-29)
Dolphins cultivate loose alliances
Dolphins behave uniquely. On the one hand, male dolphins form alliances with others; on the other hand, they live in an open social structure. (2012-03-29)
Dolphins form friendships through shared interests just like us, study finds
When it comes to making friends, it appears dolphins are just like us and form close friendships with other dolphins that have a common interest. (2019-06-11)
Dolphin cognitive abilities raise ethical questions, says Emory neuroscientist
Many modern dolphin brains are significantly larger than those of humans and second in mass to the human brain when corrected for body size, says an Emory scientist. (2010-02-18)
Mercury contamination found in stranded Victorian dolphins
Research by honors student Alissa Monk has revealed high mercury levels may be a contributing factor to dolphin deaths in Victorian waterways. (2008-06-09)
Thrill-seeking holiday-makers are putting dolphins at risk
Tourists wanting to watch and swim with dolphins are now being urged to keep their distance in a bid to protect both the animals and the local communities whose livelihoods depend on them. (2010-03-16)
Swimming with dolphins can alleviate depression
Swimming with dolphins is an effective treatment for mild to moderate depression, say researchers in this week's BMJ. (2005-11-24)
Flipper as Rambo: Dolphins can be great naval security tools
Relying on security in wartime can come from a variety of sources - even the flippers of dolphins as they continue to demonstrate in Iraqi waters. (2003-04-10)
Tuning into dolphin chatter could boost conservation efforts
Researchers from Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Australia and Curtin University have moved an important step closer to using sound rather than sight to track individual dolphin activity. (2020-04-29)
Rare Asian dolphin threatened by human activities
A rare dolphin species known for assisting fishermen by driving fish into their nets may soon disappear from the great Asian river for which the animals are named. (2003-01-15)
Environment: Pollutants found in skin and blubber of English Channel dolphins
High levels of pollutants, such as industrial fluids and mercury, may have accumulated in the blubber and skin of one of the largest coastal populations of dolphins in Europe, a study in Scientific Reports indicates. (2019-09-12)
Crocodiles and dolphins evolved similar skulls to catch the same prey: Study finds
A new study involving biologists from Monash University Australia has found that despite their very different ancestors, dolphins and crocodiles evolved similarly shaped skulls to feed on similar prey. (2017-03-07)
Stranded dolphins have amyloid plaques in their brains
Dolphins stranded on the beaches of Florida and Massachusetts show in their brains amyloid plaques, a hallmark in human beings of Alzheimer's disease, together with an environmental toxin produced by cyanobacterial blooms. (2019-03-26)
Dolphins can remain alert for up to 15 days at a time with no sign of fatigue
Dolphins sleep with only one half of their brains at a time, and according to new research published Oct. (2012-10-17)
Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication
The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil was thought to be solitary with little social structure that would require communication. (2019-04-19)
Cooperative male dolphins match the tempo of each other's calls
When it comes to working together, male dolphins coordinate their behavior just like us. (2020-03-31)
Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes
Dolphins learn new foraging techniques not just from their mothers, but also from their peers, a study by the University of Zurich has found. (2020-06-25)
Cultural hitchhiking: How social behavior can affect genetic makeup in dolphins
A UNSW-led team of researchers studying bottlenose dolphins that use sponges as tools has shown that social behavior can shape the genetic makeup of an animal population in the wild. (2014-03-18)
Dolphins are attracted to magnets
Dolphins are indeed sensitive to magnetic stimuli, as they behave differently when swimming near magnetized objects. (2014-09-29)
Commercial fishing endangers dolphin populations
Extensive commercial fishing endangers dolphin populations in the Mediterranean. This has been shown in a new study carried out at the University of Haifa's Department of Maritime Civilizations. (2010-02-04)
Dolphins use diplomacy in their communication
A Spanish researcher and a Paraguayan scientist have presented the most complete and detailed European study into the repertoire of sounds used by bottlenose dolphins to communicate. (2010-06-09)
Exeter researchers help protect Peru's river dolphins
River dolphins and Amazonian manatees in Peru will benefit from new protection thanks to a plan developed with help from the University of Exeter. (2017-05-16)
Individual 'names' reveal complex relationships in male bottlenose dolphins
Male bottlenose dolphins retain their individual 'names' well into adulthood. (2018-06-07)
Dolphin and bat DNA on the same wavelength
Scientists at Queen Mary, University of London have shown that the remarkable ability of echolocation is shared by bats and dolphins at a much deeper level than anyone previously realized -- all the way down to the molecular level. (2010-01-25)
Technique allows dolphin pregnancy exams to mirror those in humans
In a groundbreaking study just published in Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound, scientists have developed a new ultrasound technique for evaluating dolphin fetuses at all stages of gestation. (2020-01-10)
Dolphins following shrimp trawlers cluster in social groups
Bottlenose dolphins near Savannah, Georgia are split into social groups according to whether or not they forage behind commercial shrimp trawlers, according to a study published Feb. (2017-02-01)
Dolphins could be ideal model to study human cervical cancer, UF veterinarians say
Dolphins are the only species besides humans known to harbor infections of multiple papillomavirus types, which are known to be linked with cervical cancer in women. (2010-02-18)
Dolphins use double sonar
Dolphins and porpoises use echolocation for hunting and orientation. By sending out high-frequency sound, known as ultrasound, dolphins can use the echoes to determine what type of object the sound beam has hit. (2011-06-07)
Do dolphins think nonlinearly?
Research from the University of Southampton, which examines how dolphins might process their sonar signals, could provide a new system for man-made sonar to detect targets, such as sea mines, in bubbly water. (2012-07-18)
Male bottlenose dolphins form bachelor groups with their relatives
New research has analysed the behaviour of 12 dolphin social groups in South Australia's Coffin Bay region and shows males who team up in groups of two to five to form beneficial alliances may have more success. (2019-03-05)
Climate change threat to dolphins' survival
An unprecedented marine heatwave had long-lasting negative impacts on both survival and birth rates on the iconic dolphin population in Shark Bay, Western Australia. (2019-04-01)
Boat traffic threatens the survival of Panama's Bocas Del Toro dolphins
Bottlenose dolphins in Panama's Bocas Del Toro Archipelago should be designated as endangered say the authors of a new study. (2017-12-21)
Young dolphins pick their friends wisely
Strategic networking is key to career success, and not just for humans. (2020-07-23)
Dolphins maintain round-the-clock visual vigilance
Even when a dolphin sleeps, half of its brain remains conscious. (2009-05-01)
Bottlenose dolphin leaders more likely to lead relatives than unrelated individuals
Traveling into uncharted territory in search of food can be a dangerous undertaking, but some bottlenose dolphins may benefit by moving through their habitat with relatives who may be more experienced or knowledgeable. (2013-03-13)
Lend me a flipper
Researchers at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute, Kindai University, and Kagoshima City Aquarium investigated the cooperative abilities of dolphins. (2019-10-28)
Solomon Islands dolphin hunts cast spotlight on small cetacean survival
A new study on the impact of 'drive-hunting' dolphins in the Solomon Islands is casting a spotlight on the increasing vulnerability of small cetaceans around the world. (2015-05-06)
Size matters: Large Marine Protected Areas work for dolphins
Ecologists in New Zealand have shown for the first time that Marine Protected Areas - long advocated as a way of protecting threatened marine mammals - actually work. (2012-03-26)
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