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Dolphins Current Events, Dolphins News Articles.
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New tool improves fishing efficiency and sustainability
New software targets most abundant fishing grounds and reduces catch of unwanted or protected species using satellite data, maps and observations. (2018-05-30)

Meet 'Henry and Nick,' seals featured in Science study
A new experiment shows how harbor seals use their hyper- sensitive whiskers to detect hydrodynamic fish trails, a unique way to track prey in murky waters. (2001-07-05)

Unraveling the Napo's mystery
In the United States, rivers and their floodplains are well-documented and monitored. Ecuador's largest river, however, remains largely mysterious. (2013-05-20)

Unprecedented number of warm-water species moved northward during marine heatwave
A UC Davis study documents an unprecedented number of southern marine species moving northward into California and as far north as Oregon during the 2014-2016 marine heatwave. Of 67 rare, warm-water species sightings observed, 37 had never been documented so far north before. (2019-03-12)

The ultimate power nap
Behavioural studies of elephant sleep in zoos record that they sleep around four hours per day and can sleep standing up or lying down -- but how much do they sleep and how do they sleep in their natural environment? Wits researchers have made use of small activity data loggers, scientific versions of the well-known consumer fitness and wellness tracker, Fitbit, to study the sleeping patterns of elephants in the wild. (2017-03-01)

Ultra-small, parasitic bacteria found in groundwater, moose -- and you
In research first published as a pre-print in 2018, and now formally in the journal Cell Reports, scientists describe their findings that Saccharibacteria within a mammalian host are more diverse than ever anticipated. The researchers also discovered that certain members of the bacteria are found in the oral cavity of humans, the guts of other mammals, and in groundwater. (2020-07-21)

Micro-Plants Yield Pharmaceutical New Wave
Compunds with anti-cancer properties and potential for use in new generation antibiotics and nutritional supplements have been found in tiny marine plants around Australia's coastline. (1998-06-04)

Virtual reality makes journalism immersive, realism makes it credible
Virtual reality technology may help journalists pull an audience into their stories, but they should avoid being too flashy, or their credibility could suffer, according to a team of researchers. (2017-12-07)

Study shows that in baboons, as well as humans, social relationships matter
Both scientific research and our own personal experiences have revealed that the strength and quality of a person's social relationships can affect their health and lifespan. Now a new collaborative study by researchers at the University of Notre Dame, Duke University and Princeton University has discovered that social interconnectedness also matters for survival in wild female baboons. And the findings may also be applicable to other social mammals. (2014-09-10)

Scientists track porpoises to assess impact of offshore wind farms
A new study is the first in a series to understand how marine mammals like porpoises, whales, and dolphins may be impacted by the construction of wind farms off the coast of Maryland. The new research offers insight into previously unknown habits of harbor porpoises in the Maryland Wind Energy Area, a 125-square-mile area off the coast of Ocean City that may be the nation's first commercial-scale offshore wind farm. (2017-05-05)

Evidence points to conscious 'metacognition' in some nonhuman animals
J. David Smith, Ph.D., a comparative psychologist at the University at Buffalo who has conducted extensive studies in animal cognition, says there is growing evidence that animals share functional parallels with human conscious metacognition -- that is, they may share humans' ability to reflect upon, monitor or regulate their states of mind. (2009-09-14)

Neanderthals ate mussels, fish, and seals too
Over 80,000 years ago, Neanderthals fed themselves on mussels, fish and other marine life. The first evidence has been found by an international team including Göttingen University in the cave of Figueira Brava in Portugal. The excavated layers date from 86,000 to 106,000 years ago, the period when Neanderthals settled in Europe. Sourcing food from the sea at that time had only been attributed to anatomically modern humans in Africa. Results were published in Science. (2020-03-26)

Echo hunter: Researchers name new fossil whale with high frequency hearing
A newly named fossil whale species had superior high-frequency hearing ability, helped in part by the unique shape of inner ear features that have given scientists new clues about the evolution of this specialized sense. Researchers say high-frequency hearing likely predated echolocation development. (2016-08-04)

Studies of marine mammals indicate a "breathtaking" ability to dive to great depths
When it comes to diving deeply, marine mammals as different as seals and blue whales employ the same physiological adaptations to allow them to travel the maximum distance with minimum effort. So say researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), who studied the behavior of Weddell seals in Antarctica. (2000-04-09)

New index reveals likelihood of terrestrial or aquatic lifestyles of extinct mammals
Nagoya University researchers developed a new index based on rib and body weight measurements that predicts whether a mammal lived on land, in water, or both. When applied to extinct mammalian species, the index showed that some could not have supported their own weight while walking or crawling, and thus must have been restricted to an aquatic life. The index reveals the habitats of extinct species and enables reconstruction of their lifestyles and the anatomical changes that accompanied adoption of an exclusively aquatic lifestyle. (2016-07-24)

Scientists put ichthyosaurs in virtual water tanks
Using computer simulations and 3D models, paleontologists from the University of Bristol have uncovered more detail on how Mesozoic sea dragons swam. (2019-03-05)

Seven miles deep, ocean still a noisy place
For what may be the first time, NOAA and partner scientists eavesdropped on the deepest part of the world's ocean and instead of finding a sea of silence, discovered a cacophony of sounds both natural and caused by humans. (2016-03-02)

Material developed could speed up underwater communications by orders of magnitude
University of California, San Diego electrical engineering professor Zhaowei Liu and colleagues have taken the first steps in a project to develop fast-blinking LED systems for underwater optical communications. In the Jan. 6 issue of Nature Nanotechnology, Liu and colleagues show that an artificial metamaterial can increase the light intensity and (2014-01-23)

Stanford scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate
Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion -- a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University. (2019-10-03)

'Severe reduction' in killer whale numbers during last Ice Age
Whole genome sequencing has revealed a global fall in the numbers of killer whales during the last Ice Age, at a time when ocean productivity may have been widely reduced, according to researchers at Durham University. (2014-02-04)

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