Earth Current Events

Earth Current Events, Earth News Articles.
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Images of Earth and moon captured by Rosetta
Images taken right after Rosetta's second Earth swing-by last night are now available. The comet chaser's navigation camera (NAVCAM) took pictures of regions in the Antarctic and snapshots of Earth and the moon. (2007-11-14)

NASA's SDO catches a double photobomb
On Sept. 13, 2015, as NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, kept up its constant watch on the sun, its view was photobombed not once, but twice. Just as the moon came into SDO's field of view on a path to cross the sun, Earth entered the picture, blocking SDO's view completely. When SDO's view of the sun emerged from Earth's shadow, the moon was just completing its journey across the sun's face. (2015-09-14)

NASA's SDO observes Earth, lunar transits in same day
On March 11, 2013, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory was treated to two transits. Earth blocked SDO's view of the sun from about 2:15 to 3:45 a.m. EDT. Later in the same day, from around 7:30 to 8:45 a.m. EDT, the moon moved in front of the sun for a partial eclipse. (2013-03-11)

Rosetta: OSIRIS' view of Earth by night
This striking composite of Earth by night shows the illuminated crescent over Antarctica and cities of the northern hemisphere. The images were acquired with the OSIRIS Wide Angle Camera during Rosetta's second Earth swing-by on Nov. 13. (2007-11-15)

The geology of the Civil War
Historians have spent decades analyzing the military actions of the Civil War. Now geologists are having their say. (2008-10-03)

Eclipse season starts for NASA's SDO
On Sunday, Feb. 11, 2018, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, saw a total solar eclipse in space when Earth crossed its view of the sun. (2018-02-13)

Greeting another new year without a leap second
From 1972 until 1999, 22 seconds were added to the world's time in order to keep atomic time synchronized with the Earth's time, as measured by the Earth's spin. But timekeepers at NIST have not had to insert an extra second (called a leap second) into their official time scale for the last five years. Why? Because the rate of the Earth's rotation has sped up since 1999. (2003-12-19)

Liverpool scientist discovers new layer of the Earth
A University of Liverpool scientist has discovered a new layer near the Earth's core, which will enable the internal temperature of the Earth's mantle to be measured at a much deeper level than previously possible. (2005-04-14)

Research reveals Earth's core affects length of day
Research at the University of Liverpool has found that variations in the length of day over periods of between one and 10 years are caused by processes in the Earth's core. (2013-07-11)

Why is the Earth's F/Cl ratio not chondritic?
It is generally believed that terrestrial planets were made from chondrites. However, geochemical observations have shown that the abundance pattern of volatile elements, such as fluorine and chorine in the Earth is inconsistent with chondrites. New high-pressure experiments on the silicate mineral-melt partitioning of F and Cl suggest that F and Cl fractionation during magma ocean crystallization could explain the non-chondritic Earth's F/Cl ratio. (2019-06-30)

The biggest solar X-ray flare ever is classified as X28
It has been announced that the massive solar X-ray flare which occurred on 4 November was, at best estimate, an X28. There is still a small chance this will be revised by a small amount, but it is now official: We have a new number 1 X-ray flare for the record books, the most powerful in recorded observational history. (2003-11-07)

Detecting near-Earth objects
Congress has tasked NASA with detecting more near-Earth objects (NEOs) -- asteroids and comets that orbit the sun and could pose a potential hazard to Earth because they approach or cross the planet's orbit. (2010-01-20)

UCSB geologist discovers pattern in Earth's long-term climate record
In an analysis of the past 1.2 million years, UC Santa Barbara geologist Lorraine Lisiecki discovered a pattern that connects the regular changes of the Earth's orbital cycle to changes in the Earth's climate. The finding is reported in this week's issue of the scientific journal Nature Geoscience. (2010-04-06)

Earth-like planets have Earth-like interiors
Every school kid learns the basic structure of the Earth: a thin outer crust, a thick mantle, and a Mars-sized core. But is this structure universal? Will rocky exoplanets orbiting other stars have the same three layers? New research suggests that the answer is yes -- they will have interiors very similar to Earth. (2016-02-08)

Comets may have delivered significant portions of Earth's xenon
A new study suggests that roughly 22 percent of the element xenon found in Earth's atmosphere may have come from comets. (2017-06-08)

UBC study may solve age-old mystery of missing chemicals from Earth's mantle
Observations about the early formation of Earth may answer an age-old question about why the planet's mantle is missing some of the matter that should be present, according to UBC geophysicist John Hernlund. (2007-12-05)

NASA's SDO witnesses a double eclipse
Early in the morning of Sept. 1, 2016, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, caught both Earth and the moon crossing in front of the sun. SDO keeps a constant eye on the sun, but during SDO's semiannual eclipse seasons, Earth briefly blocks SDO's line of sight each day -- a consequence of SDO's geosynchronous orbit. (2016-09-02)

Earth Science Week 2013 theme announced: "Mapping Our World"
The American Geosciences Institute is pleased to announce that the theme of Earth Science Week 2013 will be (2013-01-15)

Experts explain origins of topographic relief on Earth, Mars and Titan
The surfaces of Earth, Mars, and Titan, Saturn's largest moon, have all been scoured by rivers. Yet despite this similarity and the amazingly Earth-like landscapes of Titan complete with valleys, lakes, and mountains, researchers led by City College of New York geologist Benjamin Black report new evidence that the origins of the topography there and on Mars are different from on Earth. (2017-05-19)

NASA keeps watch over space explosions
NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission has been observing a type of space explosion called magnetic reconnection for three years. MMS just witnessed such an explosion in a unique location: the part of Earth's magnetic environment trailing behind the planet, away from the Sun -- with enough resolution to reveal its true nature more clearly. (2018-11-15)

Streaks in aurora found to map features in earth's radiation environment
A special kind of streaked aurora has been found to track disturbances in near-Earth space from the ground. Known as structured diffuse aurora, it was recently discovered, with the help of NASA spacecraft and instruments, that these faint lights in the night sky can map the edges of the Van Allen radiation belts -- hazardous concentric bands of charged particles encircling Earth. (2019-08-27)

Meteorites key to the story of Earth's layers: ANU media release
A new analysis of the chemical make-up of meteorites has helped scientists work out when the Earth formed its layers. The research by an international team of scientists confirmed the Earth's first crust had formed around 4.5 billion years ago. The team measured the amount of the rare elements hafnium and lutetium in the mineral zircon in a meteorite that originated early in the solar system. (2015-04-13)

NASA spacecraft investigate clues in radiation belts
NASA's Van Allen Probes uncover new phenomena in our near-Earth environment with their unique double orbit. Recently, the spacecraft were in just the right place, at just the right time, to catch an event caused by the fallout of a geomagnetic storm as it happened. (2017-03-27)

Scientists describe 'human world'
The internationally syndicated Earth & Sky Radio Series today announced the launch of a special report on its web site on what it calls (2005-09-21)

EARTH: How dinosaurs arose
Ask your kid what happened to the dinosaurs, and he or she will likely tell you that an asteroid killed them all. But ask how dinosaurs rose to prominence and you'll likely get a blank stare. Even many paleontologists may have little to say about the subject. But now, as EARTH explores in a feature in the February issue, new fossil discoveries are revealing the backstory of the rise of dinosaurs. (2011-01-18)

Earth may always have been wet
The Earth is the only planet known to have liquid water on its surface, a fundamental characteristic when it comes to explaining the emergence of life. However, its origin is still debated. In the journal Science dated 28 August 2020, scientists from the CNRS and Université de Lorraine contribute to this debate by showing that most of the water present on the Earth today has probably been there right from the very beginning. (2020-08-27)

Antenna anomaly may affect SOHO scientific data transmission
The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft expects to experience a blackout in the transmission of its scientific data during the week of 22 June 2003. This is estimated to last for about two and a half to three weeks. (2003-06-24)

Formation of the moon brought water to Earth
As the only terrestrial planet, the Earth has a large amount of water and a relatively large moon, which stabilizes the Earth's axis. Both are essential for life to develop on Earth. Planetologists from the University of M√ľnster (Germany) have now been able to show for the first time that water came to Earth with the formation of the moon. The results are published in the current issue of the journal Nature Astronomy. (2019-05-21)

Missing chromium is clue to planet formation
Early in the formation of the Earth, some forms of the element chromium separated and disappeared deep into the planet's core, a new study by UC Davis geologists shows. (2011-02-24)

Continuing Thanksgiving eruptions on the sun
On Nov. 23, 2012, at 8:54 a.m. EST, the sun erupted with an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection or CME. Experimental NASA research models, based on observations from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and the ESA/NASA mission the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, show that the Nov. 23 CME left the sun at speeds of 375 miles per second, which is a slow to average speed for CMEs. This is the third Earth-directed CME since Nov. 20. (2012-11-26)

Plate tectonics may have been active on Earth since the very beginning
A new study suggests that plate tectonics -- a scientific theory that divides the earth into large chunks of crust that move slowly over hot viscous mantle rock -- could have been active from the planet's very beginning. The new findings defy previous beliefs that tectonic plates were developed over the course of billions of years. (2018-09-26)

New insights into how magnetic lines around Earth reconnect
High-resolution measurements from NASA spacecraft have unraveled the mysteries of magnetic reconnection around Earth -- a phenomenon whereby magnetic field lines break and reconnect, releasing energy and accelerating particles. (2016-05-12)

X-raying the Earth with waves from stormy weather 'bombs'
Using a detection network based in Japan, scientists have uncovered a rare type of deep-earth tremor that they attribute to a distant North Atlantic storm called a 'weather bomb.' The discovery marks the first time scientists have observed this particular tremor, known as an S wave microseism. (2016-08-25)

NASA's SDO observes another mid-level solar flare
An image, captured at 11:06 a.m. EDT on May 22, 2013, from the ESA/NASA Solar Heliospheric Observatory shows the conjunction of two coronal mass ejections streaming away from the sun. (2013-05-22)

Other Planets Influence Earth's Climate, University Of Toronto Scientist Says
A University of Toronto professor says a better understanding of the Earth's climate requires a better understanding of the interaction between the planet's geophysical processes and the dynamics of the Solar System as a whole. He uses numerical simulations to show the connection between the Earth's climate and the gravitational forces of Jupiter and Saturn. (1997-12-17)

EARTH: Rise of community remote sensing
If you ask someone involved in community remote sensing to define the emerging field, the most likely response will be a chuckle followed by (2011-03-22)

Asteroid fragments could hint at the origin of the solar system
University of Manchester scientists are among the few in the world selected to analyze minute asteroid fragments which could shed light on the origin and evolution of the solar system. (2012-10-04)

Here Comes The Sun...
As the recent solar mass-ejection arrives at the Earth, it is expected to produce a marked increase in the brightness of the aurora or (1997-04-09)

Unexpected abundance of hydrogen in meteorites reveals the origin of Earth's water
Meteorite material presumed to be devoid of water because it formed in the dry inner Solar System appears to have contained sufficient hydrogen to have delivered to Earth at least three times the mass of water in its oceans, a new study shows. (2020-08-27)

EARTH: Trade imbalance, America exports emissions to China
America has made great strides in recent years to reduce carbon emissions by increasing efficiency and turning to other, low or non-carbon energy sources. Meanwhile, carbon emissions in China have grown dramatically during that same time. EARTH looks at this disparity and asks the difficult questions about who is to blame when the coal China is burning is imported from (2010-12-10)

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