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Endangered Animals Current Events, Endangered Animals News Articles.
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Scientists and farmers work together to wipe out African lovegrass
A partnership between QUT, the NSW Government and farmers could lead to the eventual eradication of the highly invasive African lovegrass threatening pastures and native grasslands Australia-wide. (2017-09-21)
A 100-million-year partnership on the brink of extinction
A symbiotic relationship that has existed since the time of the dinosaurs is at risk of ending, as habitat loss and environmental change mean that a species of Australian crayfish and the tiny worms that depend on them are both at serious risk of extinction. (2016-05-24)
Traditional planting of fruit trees promotes animal diversity in the Mala
Traditional fruit gardens planted by indigenous communities in the Malaysian rainforest increase the diversity of the animals who make it their home, research has found. (2016-02-01)
Passports for penguins
Groundbreaking technology that will enable biologists to identify and monitor large numbers of endangered animals, from butterflies to whales, without being captured, will be shown to the public for the first time at this year's Royal Society Summer Science exhibition. (2008-06-27)
Ouch! Taking a shot at plague
Endangered black-footed ferrets aren't exactly lining up to be stuck with a vaccine, but in an effort to help control an extensive outbreak of plague in South Dakota, some of the ferrets are getting dosed with a vaccine given by biologists. (2008-07-16)
Endangered Species Research publishes theme section on biologging science
Biologging -- the use of miniaturized electronic tags to track animals in the wild -- has revealed previously unknown information about a wide variety of ocean animals. (2010-03-03)
Madagascar expands protected areas under visionary conservation policy
A pioneering government plan to protect much of Madagascar's remaining forests has expanded by another 1 million hectares, providing new hope that highly threatened species such as black-and-white ruffed lemurs can avoid extinction. (2006-03-21)
Checking the health of captive rhinos
White rhinoceroses are an endangered species. Proper captive management in zoos is therefore of great importance. (2016-02-24)
New DNA studies verify existence of three right whale species
For the first time, two types of genetic material--both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA--have been used to verify a new species designation of great whale, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other groups in The Royal Society's Proceedings: Biological Sciences. (2005-02-16)
Mollusk research center will propagate endangered species
A new Freshwater Mollusk Conservation Center has been established at Virginia Tech to study and propagate some of the 70 endangered mussel species in the United States. (2004-10-20)
After 100 years in captivity, a look at the world's last truly wild horses
researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Sept. (2015-09-24)
Top predators also have sway over climate
University of British Columbia researchers have found that when the animals at the top of the food chain are removed, freshwater ecosystems emit a lot more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. (2013-02-17)
Still capable of adapting: Research team studies genetic diversity of living fossils
The morphology of coelacanths has not fundamentally changed since the Devonian age, that is, for about 400 million years. (2012-06-14)
News tip: Duke marine biologist calls for whale-proof fishing gear
Current efforts to disentangle an endangered right whale whose flipper is wrapped in fishing gear off the North Carolina coast, while essential, are (2004-03-26)
Isolation of ferret protein promising for cancer, reproductive studies
Biologists studying early pregnancy in ferrets have isolated a protein vital to embryonic implantation. (2003-06-24)
Method to estimate abundance, trends in North Atlantic right whales confirms decline
NOAA Fisheries researchers and colleagues at the New England Aquarium have developed a new model to improve estimates of abundance and population trends of endangered North Atlantic right whales, which have declined in numbers and productivity in recent years. (2017-09-19)
Endangered orangutans face a new threat
The loss of habitats is considered to be the greatest threat to the endangered orangutans. (2015-10-14)
Whale sharks may produce many litters from 1 mating, paternity test shows
University of Illinois at Chicago biologist Jennifer Schmidt analyzed genetic information from preserved whale shark embryos taken from a female caught off the coast of Taiwan 15 years ago. (2010-08-24)
To breathe or to eat: Blue whales forage efficiently to maintain massive body size
As the largest animals to have ever lived on Earth, blue whales maintain their enormous body size through efficient foraging strategies that optimize the energy they gain from the krill they eat, while also conserving oxygen when diving and holding their breath, a new study has found. (2015-10-02)
NIAID-Supported Scientists Discover Origin Of HIV-1
NIAID-supported scientists report that they have discovered the origin of HIV-1, the virus responsible for the global AIDS pandemic. (1999-01-31)
Have DNA lab, will travel: mobile unit first of its kind
In a facility believed to be the first of its kind, a mobile laboratory used to collect DNA material from endangered species is now in operation at Texas A&M University. (2001-03-01)
Smithsonian scientists working to save microscopic threatened species
The Smithsonian's National Zoo recently acquired 12,000 new animals -- microscopic Elkhorn coral larvae harvested by National Zoo scientists in Puerto Rico -- as part of an international collaborative program to raise the threatened species. (2007-09-26)
Freshwater mussels discovered in urban Delaware river
Scientists working with the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary and the Academy of Natural Sciences have made an important discovery in the Delaware River between Chester, Pennsylvania, and Trenton, New Jersey: beds of freshwater mussels. (2010-11-30)
Wildlife monitoring cameras click jaguar and ocelot photos
Automated trail cameras set up by a University of Arizona research team have snapped pictures of a male jaguar and a male ocelot roaming the rugged Southern Arizona landscape. (2013-01-08)
Why bats, rats and cats store different amounts of fat
Why different animals carry different amounts of fat depends on how they have solved the problem of avoiding both starving to death and being killed by predators, new research from the University of Bristol suggests. (2012-01-20)
Research suggests fitness of Florida panthers improved by limited breeding with Texas animals
The number of living Florida panthers has grown from a previously estimated 30 to a recently counted 87 as a result of a controversial breeding effort to improve the genetic health of the endangered and inbred animals, according to a new assessment. (2005-08-18)
Prehistoric decline of freshwater mussels tied to large-scale maize cultivation
USDA Forest Service (FS) research suggests that a decline in the abundance of freshwater mussels about 1000 years ago may have been caused the large-scale cultivation of maize by Native Americans. (2005-06-07)
Lone whales shout to overcome noise
Just like people in a bar or other noisy location, North American right whales increase the volume of their calls as environmental noise increases; and just like humans, at a certain point, it may become too costly to continue to shout, according to marine and acoustic scientists. (2010-07-06)
Captive hyenas outfox wild relatives
When it comes to solving puzzles, animals in captivity are, well, different animals than their wild brethren. (2013-01-07)
Should the gray wolf keep its endangered species protection?
A decision by the US Fish and Wildlife Service to remove the gray wolf from protection under the US Endangered Species Act may be made as early as this fall. (2016-07-27)
Bamboo-loving giant pandas also have a sweet tooth
Despite the popular conception of giant pandas as continually chomping on bamboo to fulfill a voracious appetite for this reedy grass, new research from the Monell Center reveals that this highly endangered species also has a sweet tooth. (2014-03-26)
Genome projects launched for three extreme-environment animals
BGI-Shenzhen, in association with other research institutes, has launched three new genome projects that focus on animals living in extreme environments: the polar bear, the emperor penguin, and the Tibetan antelope. (2009-04-26)
A new species of a tiny freshwater snail collected from a mountainous spring in Greece
A new minute freshwater snail species belonging to the genus Daphniola was found by a researcher from University of Athens in a spring on Mt. (2011-11-01)
Vagrant bachelors could save rare bird
A study conducted by the Zoological Society of London has revealed the importance of single males in small, threatened populations. (2015-06-16)
Robust rattan palm assessed as Endangered, new Species Conservation Profile shows
An African rattan palm species has recently been assessed as Endangered, according to the IUCN Red List criteria. (2017-01-16)
Researchers find first wild alligator snapping turtle in Illinois since 1984
Researchers report the first sighting in 30 years of a wild alligator snapping turtle in Illinois. (2017-11-13)
Native orchid protection and conservation subject of new AgriLife Research study
Navasota ladies'-tresses, a wild orchid native to East and Central Texas, has been listed as an endangered plant species for three decades, but two Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists are trying to help the flower (2012-12-21)
New hope for Borneo's orangutans despite climate change and deforestation threats
New conservation research has discovered that up to 74-percent of current orangutan habitat in Borneo could become unsuitable for this endangered species due to 21st century climate or land-cover changes. (2015-01-06)
Monkey study shows a path to monitoring endangered species
A Brazilian-American research group has just published an unusual study outlining data needs for monitoring the survival of monkeys called muriquis that live in patches of forest in Brazil. (2017-12-13)
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