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Endangered Animals Current Events, Endangered Animals News Articles.
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Conservationists to CITES: Stop trade in wild cheetahs
Conservationists have joined representatives from Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda at CITES, currently meeting in Bangkok, to highlight the plight of wild cheetahs threatened by the illegal pet trade. (2013-03-08)
'Talking dictionaries' document vanishing languages
Digital technology is coming to the rescue of some of the world's most endangered languages. (2012-02-17)
Efforts to save sea turtles are a 'global conservation success story'
new study of the world's seven sea turtle species provides evidence that their numbers are growing overall (unlike many endangered vertebrates), thanks to years of conservation efforts that have played a key role in sea turtle recovery -- even for small sea turtle populations. (2017-09-20)
Abundance and distribution of Hawaiian coral species predicted by model
Researchers from the University of Hawaii, Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology developed species distribution models of the six dominant Hawaiian coral species around the main Hawaiian Islands, including two species currently under consideration as threatened or endangered. (2013-05-20)
Prey-tell: Why right whales linger in the Gulf of Maine
WHOI's Mark Baumgartner finds that the location, the length of stay, and perhaps the very abundance of the whales may be dependent on an interesting vertical migration pattern by the copepods on which the whales feed. (2011-04-26)
DNA reveals mating patterns of critically endangered sea turtle
New University of East Anglia research into the mating habits of a critically endangered sea turtle will help conservationists understand more about its mating patterns. (2013-02-03)
Baboon-like social structure creates efficiencies for spotted hyena
As large, carnivorous mammals, spotted hyenas are well known for their competitive nature; However, recent work suggests that their clan structure has similarities to some primate social systems such as those of the baboon and macaque. (2012-03-13)
Animal images used in marketing may skew public perception about their survival risks
Many of the world's most charismatic animal species -- those that attract the largest interest and deepest empathy from the public -- are at high risk of extinction in part because many people believe their iconic stature guarantees their survival. (2018-04-12)
Report in BioScience details global decline of nonmarine mollusks
A team of 16 experts from around the world has detailed the plight of what may be the world's most endangered group of animals - nonmarine mollusks (terrestrial and freshwater mollusks). (2004-04-02)
Scientists and farmers work together to wipe out African lovegrass
A partnership between QUT, the NSW Government and farmers could lead to the eventual eradication of the highly invasive African lovegrass threatening pastures and native grasslands Australia-wide. (2017-09-21)
A 100-million-year partnership on the brink of extinction
A symbiotic relationship that has existed since the time of the dinosaurs is at risk of ending, as habitat loss and environmental change mean that a species of Australian crayfish and the tiny worms that depend on them are both at serious risk of extinction. (2016-05-24)
Traditional planting of fruit trees promotes animal diversity in the Mala
Traditional fruit gardens planted by indigenous communities in the Malaysian rainforest increase the diversity of the animals who make it their home, research has found. (2016-02-01)
Passports for penguins
Groundbreaking technology that will enable biologists to identify and monitor large numbers of endangered animals, from butterflies to whales, without being captured, will be shown to the public for the first time at this year's Royal Society Summer Science exhibition. (2008-06-27)
Ouch! Taking a shot at plague
Endangered black-footed ferrets aren't exactly lining up to be stuck with a vaccine, but in an effort to help control an extensive outbreak of plague in South Dakota, some of the ferrets are getting dosed with a vaccine given by biologists. (2008-07-16)
Endangered Species Research publishes theme section on biologging science
Biologging -- the use of miniaturized electronic tags to track animals in the wild -- has revealed previously unknown information about a wide variety of ocean animals. (2010-03-03)
California plain shows surprising winners and losers from prolonged drought
A long-term study led by the University of Washington and the University of California, Berkeley tracked how hundreds of species in the Carrizo Plain National Monument fared during the historic drought that struck California from 2012 to 2015. (2018-08-20)
Madagascar expands protected areas under visionary conservation policy
A pioneering government plan to protect much of Madagascar's remaining forests has expanded by another 1 million hectares, providing new hope that highly threatened species such as black-and-white ruffed lemurs can avoid extinction. (2006-03-21)
Checking the health of captive rhinos
White rhinoceroses are an endangered species. Proper captive management in zoos is therefore of great importance. (2016-02-24)
New DNA studies verify existence of three right whale species
For the first time, two types of genetic material--both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA--have been used to verify a new species designation of great whale, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other groups in The Royal Society's Proceedings: Biological Sciences. (2005-02-16)
Mollusk research center will propagate endangered species
A new Freshwater Mollusk Conservation Center has been established at Virginia Tech to study and propagate some of the 70 endangered mussel species in the United States. (2004-10-20)
After 100 years in captivity, a look at the world's last truly wild horses
researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Sept. (2015-09-24)
Top predators also have sway over climate
University of British Columbia researchers have found that when the animals at the top of the food chain are removed, freshwater ecosystems emit a lot more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. (2013-02-17)
Still capable of adapting: Research team studies genetic diversity of living fossils
The morphology of coelacanths has not fundamentally changed since the Devonian age, that is, for about 400 million years. (2012-06-14)
News tip: Duke marine biologist calls for whale-proof fishing gear
Current efforts to disentangle an endangered right whale whose flipper is wrapped in fishing gear off the North Carolina coast, while essential, are (2004-03-26)
Isolation of ferret protein promising for cancer, reproductive studies
Biologists studying early pregnancy in ferrets have isolated a protein vital to embryonic implantation. (2003-06-24)
Method to estimate abundance, trends in North Atlantic right whales confirms decline
NOAA Fisheries researchers and colleagues at the New England Aquarium have developed a new model to improve estimates of abundance and population trends of endangered North Atlantic right whales, which have declined in numbers and productivity in recent years. (2017-09-19)
Whale sharks may produce many litters from 1 mating, paternity test shows
University of Illinois at Chicago biologist Jennifer Schmidt analyzed genetic information from preserved whale shark embryos taken from a female caught off the coast of Taiwan 15 years ago. (2010-08-24)
Endangered orangutans face a new threat
The loss of habitats is considered to be the greatest threat to the endangered orangutans. (2015-10-14)
To breathe or to eat: Blue whales forage efficiently to maintain massive body size
As the largest animals to have ever lived on Earth, blue whales maintain their enormous body size through efficient foraging strategies that optimize the energy they gain from the krill they eat, while also conserving oxygen when diving and holding their breath, a new study has found. (2015-10-02)
NIAID-Supported Scientists Discover Origin Of HIV-1
NIAID-supported scientists report that they have discovered the origin of HIV-1, the virus responsible for the global AIDS pandemic. (1999-01-31)
Have DNA lab, will travel: mobile unit first of its kind
In a facility believed to be the first of its kind, a mobile laboratory used to collect DNA material from endangered species is now in operation at Texas A&M University. (2001-03-01)
Smithsonian scientists working to save microscopic threatened species
The Smithsonian's National Zoo recently acquired 12,000 new animals -- microscopic Elkhorn coral larvae harvested by National Zoo scientists in Puerto Rico -- as part of an international collaborative program to raise the threatened species. (2007-09-26)
Freshwater mussels discovered in urban Delaware river
Scientists working with the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary and the Academy of Natural Sciences have made an important discovery in the Delaware River between Chester, Pennsylvania, and Trenton, New Jersey: beds of freshwater mussels. (2010-11-30)
Wildlife monitoring cameras click jaguar and ocelot photos
Automated trail cameras set up by a University of Arizona research team have snapped pictures of a male jaguar and a male ocelot roaming the rugged Southern Arizona landscape. (2013-01-08)
Why bats, rats and cats store different amounts of fat
Why different animals carry different amounts of fat depends on how they have solved the problem of avoiding both starving to death and being killed by predators, new research from the University of Bristol suggests. (2012-01-20)
Research suggests fitness of Florida panthers improved by limited breeding with Texas animals
The number of living Florida panthers has grown from a previously estimated 30 to a recently counted 87 as a result of a controversial breeding effort to improve the genetic health of the endangered and inbred animals, according to a new assessment. (2005-08-18)
Prehistoric decline of freshwater mussels tied to large-scale maize cultivation
USDA Forest Service (FS) research suggests that a decline in the abundance of freshwater mussels about 1000 years ago may have been caused the large-scale cultivation of maize by Native Americans. (2005-06-07)
Captive hyenas outfox wild relatives
When it comes to solving puzzles, animals in captivity are, well, different animals than their wild brethren. (2013-01-07)
Lone whales shout to overcome noise
Just like people in a bar or other noisy location, North American right whales increase the volume of their calls as environmental noise increases; and just like humans, at a certain point, it may become too costly to continue to shout, according to marine and acoustic scientists. (2010-07-06)
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