Erosion Current Events

Erosion Current Events, Erosion News Articles.
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River deep, mountain high -- new study reveals clues to lifecycle of worlds iconic mountains
Scientists have discovered the reasons behind the lifespan of some of the world's iconic mountain ranges. (2013-06-27)

Tiny microbes make a surprisingly big contribution to carbon release
As erosion eats away at Earth's surface, some types of rocks release carbon they contain back into the atmosphere -- and now a new study suggests that microbes play a substantial role in this release. (2018-04-12)

Agricultural soil erosion not contributing to global warming, study shows
Agricultural soil erosion is not a source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, according to research published online today in Science. The study was carried out by an international team led by researchers at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, the University of Exeter, UK, and the University of California, Davis. (2007-10-25)

Vegetation can help prevent soil erosion due to wind
Dust from soil erosion due to wind can affect human health, traffic, and, on a larger scale, climate. Investigators compared different models that quantify how the wind energy spreads over an herbaceous surface using data from the Sahel region of Africa, where estimates of dust emissions remain uncertain. They found that the modeling tools give results in reasonable agreement, indicating that vegetation can decrease the amount of dust emitted from soil erosion by 6 percent to 26 percent in mass compared with bare soil. (2015-01-20)

Scientists modelled natural rock arcades
Researchers from Russia and the Czech Republic performed numerical modelling of natural rock arcades using a mathematical model that describes a succession of arches forming as a result of weathering and then turning into rock pillars without human involvement, despite their striking resemblance to architectural arcades. (2020-06-23)

Agricultural soil erosion is not adding to global warming
Agricultural soil erosion is not a source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, according to research published online today (Oct. 25) in the journal Science. (2007-10-25)

After the forest fire: Evergreen needles prevent soil erosion
Once a raging forest fire is quelled, the next worry is erosion of the landscape. Scientists show that scorched evergreen needles can play a key role in preventing erosion. These findings can help post-fire rehabilitation teams decide where to apply treatments to reduce erosion. (2003-11-18)

The law of the landscape for glaciers?
Fast glaciers are much more effective at gouging landscapes than slow-moving ones, a new study finds. (2015-10-08)

Soil erosion threatens environment and human health
Soil is being swept and washed away 10 to 40 times faster than it is being replenished around the world, destroying cropland the size of Indiana every year, reports a study by David Pimentel of Cornell University. Yet the need for food and other grown products continues to soar. (2006-03-22)

Climate change and land use are accelerating soil erosion by water
Soil loss due to water runoff could increase greatly around the world over the next 50 years due to climate change and intensive land cultivation. This was the conclusion of an international team of researchers led by the University of Basel, which published the results from its model calculation in the scientific journal PNAS. (2020-08-24)

River shaping from floods happens in moderation
An assessment of rivers in the US suggests that although there is a relationship between increased flood size and erosion, the effect is most pronounced for moderate floods. (2016-05-05)

Graffiti for science
In a new feasibility study, a Swiss-German team of scientists with the participation of Jens Turowski, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam -- GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, shows how erosive processes can be visualized by simple painting on rocks in a mountain gorge in the Swiss Alps. (2016-12-16)

Dental erosion
Frequently consuming foods with a low pH value, such as soft drinks, fruit juices, pickles, fresh fruit and yogurt can lead to irreversible dental erosion, according to a report in the January/February issue of General Dentistry, the Academy of General Dentistry's (AGD) clinical, peer-reviewed journal. (2005-03-21)

Geologists find a new active fault in Nepal
A Dartmouth researcher is part of a team that has discovered a new active (2005-04-20)

Climate change speeds up gully erosion
The erosion of large natural channels by flowing water -- gully erosion -- can wreak havoc on fields, roads, and buildings. In some cases, the sudden expansion of gullies even claims human lives. Geographers from KU Leuven, Belgium, are the first to show a worldwide link between heavy rainfall and the speed at which gullies expand. With predicted climate change, gullies may erode up to three times faster. (2016-02-25)

Unsustainable soil erosion in parts of UK
New research demonstrates unsustainable levels of soil erosion in the UK. (2020-04-22)

August 2011 GSA Today science: Understanding Earth's eroding surface with 10Be
In a groundbreaking compilation of 1528 calculations of surface erosion rates from 80 study areas from all over the world, authors provide a valuable look at how rates of erosion vary in differing climates and tectonic settings in the recent geological past. (2011-08-02)

Soil area the size of Berlin lost each year due to water erosion in the EU
A recent assessment carried out by the JRC estimates that water erodes 970 million tonnes of soil every year in the EU. This would mean a one meter-depth loss of soil from an area corresponding to the size of the city of Berlin, or a one centimeter loss from an area twice the size of Belgium. (2015-09-02)

People cause more soil erosion than all natural processes
Human activity causes 10 times more erosion of continental surfaces than all natural processes combined, an analysis by a University of Michigan geologist shows. (2004-11-03)

Root beer may be 'safest' soft drink for teeth
Exposing teeth to soft drinks, even for a short period of time, causes dental erosion -- and prolonged exposure can lead to significant enamel loss. Root beer products, however, are non-carbonated and do not contain the acids that harm teeth, according to a study in the March/April 2007 issue of General Dentistry, the AGD's clinical, peer-reviewed journal. (2007-03-20)

Gorges are eradicated by downstream sweep erosion
A fast new mechanism drives the process of fluvial erosion. (2014-08-17)

Solutions to abrasion and erosion in wind generator vanes
Wind generator vanes can suffer degradation by erosion, particularly at their outer edge, produced by particles (dust, sand, etc.) which are present suspended in the air. (2005-09-12)

The price paid for higher energy is highly dangerous to teeth
Previous scientific research findings have helped to warn consumers that the pH (potential of hydrogen) levels in beverages such as soda could lead to tooth erosion, the breakdown of tooth structure caused by the effect of acid on the teeth that leads to decay. However, the pH level of soft drinks isn't the only factor that causes dental erosion. A beverage's (2008-03-12)

No-till practices in vulnerable areas significantly reduce soil erosion
Soil erosion is a major challenge in agricultural production. It affects soil quality and carries nutrient sediments that pollute waterways. While soil erosion is a naturally occurring process, agricultural activities such as conventional tilling exacerbate it. Farmers implementing no-till practices can significantly reduce soil erosion rates, a new University of Illinois study shows. (2021-01-12)

Global erosivity map shows differences between climatic regions
The first ever global erosivity map gives new insights into the geography of the rain's impact on soil erosion. The underlying JRC research, published in the Nature Group's Scientific Reports, highlights differences between climatic regions and calls for global action to protect our soils. (2017-07-05)

What's driving erosion worldwide?
ETH Zurich researchers are reexamining the causes of soil erosion around the world -- and have found that countries themselves have a surprisingly strong influence on their soil. This country effect was previously undetected. (2019-12-03)

Multiple sites rich in water ice found on Mars
Erosion on Mars is exposing deposits of water ice, starting at depths as shallow as one to two meters below the surface and extending 100 meters or more. (2018-01-11)

Huge time-lag between erosion and mountain building
An unprecedented record of erosion rates dating back millions of years shows a significant time-lag between tectonic uplift and maximum erosion rates in the Argentine Precordillera mountains. According to a new study by an international team of scientists, tectonic shortening and exhumation of rocks peaked between twelve and nine million years ago whereas the maximum erosional response is detected roughly seven million years ago, i.e. two million years later. (2016-07-19)

Helping Chinese farmers tackle erosion, increase profits
On the steep farming slopes of China, Bozhi Wu and his research associates are finding ways to improve economic and environmental stability. They studied intercropping with corn and either setaria grass or chili peppers. (2017-09-13)

Scorpions inspire scientists in making tougher surfaces for machinery
Taking inspiration from the yellow fattail scorpion, which uses a bionic shield to protect itself against scratches from desert sandstorms, scientists have developed a new way to protect the moving parts of machinery from wear and tear. A report on the research appears in ACS' journal Langmuir. (2012-01-25)

Pasture management and riparian buffers reduce erosion
A 12-year study was completed in Arkansas watersheds. (2017-05-08)

Erosion has a point -- and an edge, NYU researchers find
Erosion caused by flowing water does not only smooth out objects, but can also form distinct shapes with sharp points and edges, a team of New York University researchers has found. Their findings reveal the unexpected ways that erosion can affect landscapes and artificial materials. (2012-11-12)

Methane not released by wind on Mars, experts find
New study rules out wind erosion as the source of methane gas on Mars and moves a step closer to answering the question of whether life exists on other planets. (2019-08-12)

Carbon buried in the soil rises again
A team of researchers estimated that roughly half of the carbon buried in soil by erosion will be re-released into the atmosphere within about 500 years, and possibly faster due to climate change. (2012-11-05)

Massive seagrass die-off leads to widespread erosion in a California estuary
The large-scale loss of eelgrass in a major California estuary -- Morro Bay -- may be causing widespread erosion. Over the last century, Morro Bay has been building up sediment quickly. After the die-off, however, erosion took place in more than 90% of the places where eelgrass previously grew. (2020-07-27)

How to manage erosion caused by everyday beverages
In a recent study that appeared in the May/June 2009 issue of General Dentistry, the AGD's clinical, peer-reviewed journal, lead author, Mohamed A. Bassiouny, D.M.D, M.Sc., Ph.D., outlined the acidic content of beverages, such as soda; lemon, grapefruit and orange juice; green and black tea; and revealed three steps to rehabilitate teeth that suffer from dental erosion as a result of the excessive consumption of these products. (2009-07-17)

Global climate hot topic for AAAS conference in Anchorage, AK
When it comes to global climate change, effects of the phenomenon are seen in Arctic regions first. Evidence of this change comes in a variety of forms: warming permafrost, coastal erosion, extreme temperature fluctuations, and signs from the region's forests. Experts in each of these areas will meet during a special session of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Arctic Division Science Conference in Anchorage on Wednesday, Sept. 29. (2004-09-29)

Humans causing erosion comparable to world's largest rivers and glaciers
A new study finds that large-scale farming projects can erode the Earth's surface at rates comparable to those of the world's largest rivers and glaciers. Published online in the journal Nature Geosciences, the research offers stark evidence of how humans are reshaping the planet. It also finds that -- contrary to previous scholarship -- rivers are as powerful as glaciers at eroding landscapes. (2009-09-02)

Geotimes: The impending coastal crisis
Coastlines are the most dynamic feature on the planet. In the March issue, Geotimes magazine looks into the risks of increased development along our coastlines and what that means for erosion, flooding and future development. (2008-03-12)

Erosion process studies in the Volga Region assist in land use planning
Dr. Gusarov (Paleoclimatology, Paleoecology and Paleomagnetism Lab) has been working on erosion processes for two decades as a part of various teams. In this research, he tackled the Middle Volga Region, the one where the city of Kazan - and Kazan Federal University - are situated. (2020-04-27)

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