Flame Retardants Current Events

Flame Retardants Current Events, Flame Retardants News Articles.
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Potentially toxic flame retardants detected in baby products
Scientists are reporting detection of potentially toxic flame retardants in car seats, bassinet mattresses, nursing pillows, high chairs, strollers and other products that contain polyurethane foam and are designed for newborns, infants and toddlers. In a study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, they describe hints that one flame retardant, banned years ago in some areas, actually remains in use. (2011-05-18)

Toxicological cross-check
Flame retardants are invisible assistants in car seats, gasket sealants, furniture and even in airplanes. However, their ingredients are not always harmless. Empa researchers developed three innovative flame retardants and tested them for toxicity; not all of them passed the test. (2016-07-18)

Researchers discover that human hair and nails can tell toxic secrets
Chemicals used as flame retardants that are potentially harmful to humans are found in hair, toenails and fingernails, according to new research from Indiana University. (2016-03-02)

Many home couches contain potentially toxic flame retardants
Scientists are reporting an increasing use of flame retardants in the main gathering spot for adults, children and family pets in the home -- the couch. In a study published in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, they describe the first efforts to detect and identify the flame retardants applied to the foam inside couches found in millions of family rooms and living rooms across the US. (2012-11-28)

The controversy over flame retardants in millions of sofas, chairs and other products
Flame retardants in the polyurethane foam of millions of upholstered sofas, overstuffed chairs and other products have ignited a heated debate over safety, efficacy and fire-safety standards -- and a search for alternative materials. That's the topic of a cover story package in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of ACS, the world's largest scientific society. (2012-10-31)

Non-toxic flame retardants
Flame retardants are often extremely harmful to health. Despite this, they are found in many types of synthetic materials which would otherwise ignite quickly. Empa researchers have now succeeded in producing non-harmful flame retardants. (2013-07-23)

Improved plastics recycling thanks to spectral imaging
Plastics recycling is complicated by the need to recycle similar plastics together. The presence of flame retardants in plastics also needs to be identified, and a NIR hyperspectral imaging method to do so is reported in this paper in the peer-reviewed, open-access journal, JSI -- Journal of Spectral Imaging. (2019-01-22)

Study raises concern about flame-retardant metabolites in bald eagles
A study finds that chemicals used in flame retardants, plasticizers and other commercial products are broken down through the process of metabolism into other compounds. Researchers say not enough is known about the dangers posed by those compounds, known as metabolites. (2018-07-11)

Flame retardants prove ineffective on fresh-cut Christmas trees
This Christmas season, think twice about spending money on a commercial flame retardant for your Christmas tree. The good, old-fashioned method -- keeping your tree in a container of fresh water -- is probably all you need to keep your tree green and healthy. Researchers have determined that some flame retardants don't work on cut Christmas trees; in fact, in several cases the chemical retardants sped up the drying process and made trees more flammable. (2008-12-12)

Flame retardants linked to preterm birth
Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch have determined that maternal exposure to high levels of flame-retardants may be a contributing factor in preterm births. (2015-01-28)

Potentially toxic flame retardants found in many US couches
More than half of all couches tested in a Duke University-led study contained potentially toxic or untested chemical flame retardants that may pose risks to human health. (2012-11-28)

Climate-friendly foam building insulation may do more harm than good
The use of the polymeric flame retardant PolyFR in 'eco-friendly' foam plastic building insulation may be harmful to human health and the environment, according to a new commentary in Environmental Science & Technology. The authors' analysis identifies several points during the lifecycle of foam insulation that may expose workers, communities, and ecosystems to PolyFR and its potentially toxic breakdown products. (2021-02-23)

A surprising way laundry adds flame retardants to surface waters
In recent years, evidence has been building suggesting that flame retardants, which are used in furniture and electronics, are potentially linked to health problems. And studies have shown that the substances leach out of products, and end up in indoor dust, air and in us. Now, scientists report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology how flame retardants in our homes could also be contaminating surface water through our laundry. (2016-08-10)

Study finds toxic flame retardants in children's car seats
Indiana University scientists have found toxic flame retardants in newly manufactured children's car seats, sparking concerns about children's health. Of the 18 children's car seats tested, 15 contained new or traditional hazardous flame retardant chemicals. (2018-12-03)

Non-toxic flame retardants
Electronics, vehicles, textiles -- almost all modern-day products contain some form of plastic. Its high combustibility means it must be protected from naked flames. New techniques simplify the production of environmentally friendly flame retardants. (2013-10-22)

High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats
A study from Stockholm University has now established what was previously suspected, that the high levels of brominated flame retardants measured in cats are from the dust in our homes. The study has been published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. (2017-02-24)

Flame retardant breakthrough is naturally derived and nontoxic
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have created a new flame retardant to replace commercial additives that are often toxic and can accumulate over time in the environment and living animals, including humans. (2015-10-05)

Debate on banning organohalogen flame retardants heats up
Hundreds of everyday household items, from laptop computers to babies' high chairs, contain flame retardants to prevent the objects from catching fire. Recently, several groups petitioned a U.S. agency to ban flame retardants known as organohalogens, some of which can migrate out of household items. Others argue against blacklisting an entire class of compounds without further study, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2018-09-26)

Handwashing and house cleaning may protect against unhealthy chemicals
Washing your hands and cleaning your house frequently may help to lower your contact with common flame-retardant chemicals, according to a new study by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. The study is the first to assess whether house cleaning and handwashing can effectively lower exposure to flame retardants. Results appear in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. (2018-06-28)

Study finds another reason to wash hands: Flame retardants
Harmful flame retardants may be lurking on your hands and cell phone, according to a peer-reviewed study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters. (2020-06-09)

Study finds flame retardant pollutants at far-flung locations
Chemicals used as flame retardants are present as environmental pollutants at locations around the globe, including remote sites in Indonesia, Nepal and Tasmania, according to a study by researchers from the Indiana University. (2013-01-08)

Exposure to common flame retardants may raise the risk of papillary thyroid cancer
Some flame retardants used in many home products appear to be associated with the most common type of thyroid cancer, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), according to a new study being presented Saturday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting, ENDO 2017, in Orlando, Fla. (2017-04-01)

3-D images show flame retardants can mimic estrogens in NIH study
By determining the three-dimensional structure of proteins at the atomic level, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered how some commonly used flame retardants, called brominated flame retardants (BFRs), can mimic estrogen hormones and possibly disrupt the body's endocrine system. BFRs are chemicals added or applied to materials to slow or prevent the start or growth of fire. (2013-08-19)

New flame retardants, old problems
New flame retardants escaping from our TVs, other electrical and electronic products, and children's car seats are just as toxic as the flame retardants they're intended to replace, according to a peer-reviewed study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters. The authors found that the replacement chemicals, called organophosphate flame retardants, have been associated with lower IQ in children, reproductive problems, and other serious health harms. (2019-10-22)

Flame retardants could contribute to hyperthyroidism in older cats
For years, health advocates have been pushing to ban some flame retardants for their potentially harmful effects, especially on young children and infants. Now scientists report these compounds could play a role in a common health problem for one of our most beloved pets: cats. In the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, a new study found that cats with hyperthyroidism had high levels of certain flame retardants, hinting at a possible link. (2015-04-22)

Flame retardant chemicals may affect social behavior in young children
Some chemicals added to furniture, electronics and numerous other goods to prevent fires may have unintended developmental consequences for young children, according to a pilot study released today. (2017-03-09)

Study links gymnastics equipment to exposure to flame-retardant chemicals
As the summer Olympics get underway, a new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health researchers reports that popular gymnastics training equipment contains mixtures of flame-retardant chemicals that have been linked to increased risks of ADHD, cancer and brain development delays. (2016-07-26)

Exposure to a newer flame retardant has been on the rise
Out of concern that flame retardants -- polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) -- cause health problems, the US government worked with manufacturers to start phasing them out in 2004. But evidence has been building that PBDE replacements, including organophosphate flame retardants, are in the environment and in our bodies. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters that exposure to at least one of the newer compounds has increased significantly over the past decade. (2017-02-08)

Study finds flame retardant exposure higher in infants than adults
In October, Macy's joined a growing list of major retail stores that have pledged to stop selling furniture containing flame retardants, which research suggests could cause developmental problems. Despite the trend, however, it could take years before widespread exposure declines. And now, a study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology has revealed more bad news: Infants could potentially be affected the most. The report also looks at potential exposure routes. (2015-12-02)

Banned chemicals pass through umbilical cord from mother to baby, research finds
Trace amounts of flame retardants, banned in the US for more than a decade, are still being passed through umbilical cord blood from mothers to their babies, according to new Indiana University research. The chemicals are linked to health concerns including hormone disruption and low birth weight. (2017-06-29)

Study finds hazardous flame retardants in preschools
A new study led by UC Berkeley researchers finds that finds that flame retardants are prevalent indoors in preschools and day care centers, potentially exposing young children to chemicals known to be hazardous. (2014-05-15)

A 'nano,' environmentally friendly, and low toxicity flame retardant protects fabric
The technology in (2011-08-31)

New study: Many flame retardants in house dust -- unsafe levels
In Silent Spring Institute's new peer-reviewed study of the largest number of flame retardants ever tested in homes, we found that most houses had levels of at least one flame retardant that exceeded a federal health guideline. (2012-11-28)

Novel coatings show great promise as flame retardants in polyurethane foam
Gram for gram, novel carbon nanofiber-filled coatings devised by NIST researchers and Texas A&M University outperformed conventional flame retardants used in the polyurethane foam of upholstered furniture chairs, and mattresses by at least 160 percent and perhaps by as much as 1,130 percent. (2011-08-03)

Safer, more environmentally friendly flame retardant with first-of-its-kind dual effects
Amid concerns over the potential health effects of existing flame retardants for home furniture, fabrics and other material, scientists are reporting development of an (2013-05-15)

BU study finds gymnasts' face high exposure to flame retardants
Competitive gymnasts have a higher exposure to potentially harmful flame-retardants than the general population, likely because such contaminants are present in foam used in gym equipment, a study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers has found. (2013-11-13)

A previously unrecognized flame retardant found in Americans for the first time
This is the first study to find the carcinogenic flame retardant TCEP in the bodies of Americans. It's also the first study to evaluate urinary levels of several phosphate flame retardant metabolites, like TCEP, which have been largely under the radar. Six metabolites were found in urine samples from California residents. People with the highest metabolite levels of two carcinogenic flame retardants also had the highest levels in their house dust, which were previously tested. (2014-11-12)

Flooding of farmland does not increase levels of potentially harmful flame retardants in milk
As millions of acres of farmland in the US Midwest and South recover from Mississippi River flooding, scientists report that river flooding can increase levels of potentially harmful flame retardants in farm soils. But the higher levels apparently do not find their way into the milk produced by cows that graze on these lands, according to a study in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology. (2011-06-08)

Tent camping could lead to flame retardant exposure
For campers, nothing beats sleeping in a tent in the great outdoors. But scientists are finding out the air inside tents might not be as fresh as people think. A study appearing in Environmental Science & Technology has found that flame retardants used in the manufacturing of tents are released in the air within this enclosed space, which could lead to campers breathing them in. (2016-05-11)

NYC toddlers exposed to potentially harmful flame retardants
Researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) within the Mailman School of Public Health report evidence of potentially harmful flame retardants on the hands and in the homes of 100 percent of a sample of New York City mothers and toddlers. The study also found that on average toddlers in New York City had higher levels of common flame-retardants on their hands compared to their mothers. (2017-01-23)

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