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Genetic Diversity Current Events, Genetic Diversity News Articles.
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Mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest revealed
A research group led by Prof. MA Keping from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Institute of Microbiology, have now revealed the underlying mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest. (2019-10-09)

Evolution of the Darwin's finches and their beaks
Darwin's finches, inhabiting the Gal√°pagos archipelago and Cocos island, constitute an iconic model for studies of speciation and adaptive evolution. A team of scientists from Uppsala University and Princeton University has now shed light on the evolutionary history of these birds and identified a gene that explains variation in beak shape within and among species. The study is published today in Nature, on the day before the 206th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin. (2015-02-11)

Flu tracked to viral reservoir in tropics
Each winter, strains of influenza A virus infect North Americans, causing an average of 36,000 deaths. Now, researchers say the virus comes from a viral reservoir somewhere in the tropics, settling a key debate on the source of each season's infection. (2008-04-16)

'Eve' and descendants shape global sperm whale population structure
Although sperm whales have not been driven to the brink of extinction as have some other whales, a new study has found a remarkable lack of diversity in the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA within the species. (2016-05-03)

Cancer's relentless evolution
In new research, Carlo Maley, Ph.D., and his colleagues describe compulsive evolution and dramatic genetic diversity in cells belonging to one of the most treatment-resistant and lethal forms of blood cancer: acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The authors suggest the research may point to new paradigms in both the diagnosis and treatment of aggressive cancers, like AML. (2015-04-01)

Remaking history: A new take on how evolution has shaped modern Europeans
Investigators reporting in the Cell Press journal Trends in Genetics say that new analytical techniques are changing long-held, simplistic views about the evolutionary history of humans in Europe. Their findings indicate that many cultural, climatic, and demographic events have shaped genetic variation among modern-day European populations and that the variety of those mechanisms is more diverse than previously thought. (2012-08-14)

Scientists unlock secrets of Ethiopia's superfood in race to save it from warming climate
Teff, an ancient grain originally from Ethiopia, is a staple crop for 50 million people in the country. It is also increasingly popular worldwide, touted as a superfood for its gluten-free, high fiber and protein, and low-sugar properties. Yet dramatic temperature increases projected in Ethiopia by 2070, could force farmers to grow it only in mountainous areas at higher altitudes, driving down production. (2020-06-18)

Same cancer, different time zone
Just as no two people possess the same genetic makeup, a recent study has shown that no two single tumor cells in breast cancer patients have an identical genome. In fact, depending on the tumor cell, they grow at dramatically different speeds, according to a study led by Nicholas Navin, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Genetics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. (2014-07-28)

Genetic diversity facilitates cancer therapy
Cancer patients with more different HLA genes respond better to treatment. (2019-11-08)

Team led by IU biologists confirms sunflower domesticated in US, not Mexico
New genetic evidence presented by a team led by Indiana University biology doctoral graduate Benjamin Blackman confirms the eastern United States as the single geographic domestication site of modern sunflowers. (2011-08-15)

Conservation scientists 'unanimous' in expectations of serious loss of biological diversity
The number of species being recognized as endangered is ever increasing and a new study, published in Conservation Biology, reveals the unanimity among conservation scientists of expectations of a major loss of biological diversity. The survey also shows a growing acceptance of controversial strategies such as triage, a decision to prioritize resources and not to intervene to save some highly threatened species. (2011-11-08)

Large-scale biodiversity is vital to maintain ecosystem health
Over the years ecologists have shown how biological diversity benefits the health of small, natural communities. New analysis by ecologists at UC Santa Cruz demonstrates that even higher levels of biological diversity are necessary to maintain ecosystem health in larger landscapes over long periods of time. (2013-06-07)

NHGRI funds two new centers of excellence in genomic science
The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) has awarded two new grants in its Centers of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS) program, a unique research effort that assembles interdisciplinary teams of scientists to explore genomic function. (2002-08-05)

Too much of a good thing? Excess nutrients or water limit biodiversity
Too much of a good thing (nutrients or water) actually decreases the diversity of species in an ecosystem while it increases the productivity of a few species, according to a grassland experiment conducted by University of Minnesota researchers. (2007-03-25)

Complex genetic architectures: Some common symptoms of trisomy 21
In a study conducted by Professor Stylianos Antonarakis' group from the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva, researchers have identified the genomic variations associated with trisomy 21, determining the risk of congenital heart disease in people with Down syndrome. These result add to other research conducted by the same team about chronic myeloid leukemia, a severe form of leukemia that often affects people with Down syndrome. (2013-06-26)

Well established theories on patterns in evolution might be wrong
How do the large-scale patterns we observe in evolution arise? A new paper in the journal Evolution by researchers at Uppsala University and University of Leeds argues that many of them are a type of statistical artefact caused by our unavoidably recent viewpoint looking back into the past. As a result, it might not be possible to draw any conclusions about what caused the enormous changes in diversity we see through time. (2018-09-27)

Global warming kills gut bacteria in lizards
Climate change could threaten reptiles by reducing the number of bacteria living in their guts, new research suggests. (2017-05-08)

UTA researcher earns NSF grant to study biodiversity in Africa
UT Arlington assistant biology professor Matthew Fujita has earned a National Science Foundation grant to study the rich species diversity in West and Central Africa. (2015-03-29)

Genetic, developmental and anatomical basis of natural selection for sensory structures
Hoping to understand how the tremendous diversity of life on Earth evolved even as irreversible species and habitat loss rapidly proceeds, a research group of bat experts including biologist Elizabeth Dumont of the University of Massachusetts Amherst has received a five-year, $1.91 million grant from the National Science Foundation to study how bats sense their environment and other individuals, including potential mates, to ensure survival and reproduction. (2014-09-25)

Molecular subtypes and genetic alterations may determine response to lung cancer therapy
A UNC-led team of scientists has shown for the first time that lung cancer molecular subtypes correlate with distinct genetic alterations and with patient response to therapy. These findings in pre-clinical models and patient tumor samples build on their previous report of three molecular subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer and refines their molecular analysis of tumors. (2012-05-11)

Hachimoji -- Expanding the genetic alphabet from four to eight
A new form of synthetic DNA expands the information density of the genetic code, that likely preserves its capability for supporting life, according to a new study. (2019-02-21)

Genome scan shows Polynesians have little genetic relationship to Melanesians
The origins and current genetic relationships of Pacific Islanders have generated interest and controversy for many decades. Now, a new comprehensive genetic study of almost 1,000 individuals has revealed that Polynesians and Micronesians have almost no genetic relation to Melanesians, and that groups that live in the islands of Melanesia are remarkably diverse. (2008-01-17)

Biodiversity depends on historical plant and animal relationships
Scientists at Rutgers' Cook College and the University of Tennessee have discovered that how plant and animal communities originally assemble is a predictor of future biodiversity and ecosystem productivity. (2003-07-24)

Research links diversity with increased sales revenue and profits, more customers
Workplace diversity is among the most important predictors of a business' sales revenue, customer numbers and profitability, according to research to be published in the April issue of the American Sociological Review. (2009-03-31)

Many heavily breastfed infants not getting needed dietary diversity
Approximately three of every four Cincinnati infants heavily breastfeed after the age of six months is not obtaining the level of dietary diversity recommended by the World Health Organization, according to a new Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center study. (2014-05-03)

Gaps in international law impede pandemic research
The global COVID-19 pandemic reveals gaps in international law that can inhibit the sharing of scientific information, biological samples and genetic sequence data (GSD) crucial to the timely development of diagnostics, antiviral treatments and vaccines to address novel viral threats. (2020-05-14)

Middle Stone Age populations repeatedly occupied West African coast
In a study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science Reports, researchers from the Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Senegal, the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH), and the University of Sheffield, reveal evidence of Middle Stone Age occupations of the West African coast. Ranging from 62 to 25 thousand years ago, the largest well-dated assemblages from the region clearly document technological continuity across almost 40,000 years in West Africa. (2020-11-20)

Ants provide clues to why biodiversity is higher in the tropics
New global data of invertebrate distributions suggests time holds key to species diversity. (2018-05-30)

World's botanic gardens contain a third of all known plant species, and help protect the most threatened
The most in-depth species survey to date finds an 'astonishing array' of plant diversity in the global botanic garden network, including 41 percent of all endangered species. However, researchers find a significant imbalance between tropical and temperate plants, and say even more capacity should be given to conservation, as there is 'no technical reason for plant species to become extinct.' (2017-09-25)

Rutgers researcher offers a new perspective on human evolution
Chi-Hua Chiu introduces and emerging perspective in the study of human origins: the underlying developmental and genetic processes that led to evolutionary changes. (2004-02-15)

Diversity without limits
Now, researchers at Temple and Oakland universities have completed a new tree of prokaryotic life calibrated to time, assembled from 11,784 species of bacteria. The new tree explores grand patterns of evolutionary change that, surprisingly, has revealed remarkable similarities with that of eukaryotes, including animals, plants, and fungi. (2016-11-22)

Researchers detail marine viruses from pole to pole
New research provides the most complete account to date of the viruses that impact the world's oceans, increasing the number of known virus populations tenfold. Researchers analyzed marine samples far and deep in an effort to understand the complexities of viruses, which are increasingly being recognized as important players in the oceans' role in tempering the effects of climate change. (2019-04-25)

Native desert bighorn sheep in ecologically intact areas are less vulnerable to climate change
In the American Southwest, native desert bighorn sheep populations found in landscapes with minimal human disturbance, including several national parks, are less likely to be vulnerable to climate change. (2020-08-26)

Actress Kiruna Stamell debates gene editing with ethicist Dr. Christopher Gyngell
Two papers published today by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, debate gene editing and the health of future generations. Stage and screen actress Kiruna Stamell, who has a rare form of dwarfism, proposes that gene editing does not represent an improvement in healthcare; while Dr. Christopher Gyngell, a research fellow at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, argues that provided it is well regulated, gene editing could greatly improve the health of our descendants. (2017-04-26)

Blurred lines: Human sex chromosome swapping occurs more often than previously thought
It turns out that the rigid 'line in the sand' over which the human sex chromosomes -- the Y and X -- go to avoid crossing over is a bit blurrier than previously thought. Contrary to the current scientific consensus, Arizona State University assistant professor Melissa Wilson Sayres has led a research team that has shown that X and Y DNA swapping may occur much more often. (2016-03-23)

Students of all races feel safer in ethnically diverse middle schools, UCLA study says
Middle school students -- African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans and Caucasians -- felt safer and less bullied, reported more tolerance and less prejudice toward students of other ethnicities and believed teachers treated all students more fairly and equally in more diverse schools, UCLA researchers report today in the journal Child Development. (2017-06-20)

Multi-institutional collaborative effort to create a cell map of the human heart
Researchers from the? Masonic Medical Research Institute (MMRI), the Precision Cardiology Lab (PCL) of the Broad Institute at MIT and Harvard, Bayer USA, Massachusetts General Hospital, and University of Pennsylvania collaborated to uncover some pressing questions about the biology of the heart. While understanding the mechanisms causal to human heart disease remain active areas of research for many scientists, important knowledge gaps about its composition and function remain unknown. (2020-09-16)

Evolution of China's flowering plants shows East-West divide between old, new lineages
An international team of scientists has mapped the evolutionary relationships between China's 30,000 flowering plant species, uncovering a distinct regional pattern in biodiversity. Eastern China is a floral 'museum' with a rich array of ancient lineages and distant relatives while the western provinces are an evolutionary 'cradle' for newer and more closely related species. (2018-01-31)

'TRAP' preserves genetic properties of popular geranium
Reseachers at the Ohio State University have demonstrated that Target Region Amplification Polymorphism, or TRAP, is an effective method for preserving the important genetic diversity of ornamental flower collections. (2007-11-05)

Mount Sinai researchers call for diversity in the next generation of personalized medicine
Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai reveal that genomic data extracted from population biobanks across the globe contain much less ethnic diversity than desirable. Of the nearly 5 million samples of DNA contributed to biobanks worldwide, 68 percent come from individuals of European ancestry. (2019-03-21)

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