Genetics Current Events

Genetics Current Events, Genetics News Articles.
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Science Writers Workshop
A Science Writers Workshop will be held on the topic of CARDIOVASCULAR GENETICS, 10 a.m., October 28, 1998, during the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics, Rm. A106 Colorado Convention Center, Denver, Colorado. (1998-10-25)

Editor of Springer classic human genetics reference receives prize
Arno Motulsky, the senior editor of the 4th edition of Springer's classic reference and textbook Vogel and Motulsky's Human Genetics, was recently given the Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award. The prize, which recognizes Professor Motulsky's outstanding contributions to the field of human genetics, was presented to him at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics on Oct. 24, 2009, in Honolulu, Hawaii. (2009-12-11)

ASHG and NHGRI award first genetics and education fellowship
The American Society of Human Genetics and the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, have named Elizabeth P. Tuck, M.A., Upper School Science Teacher at The Wellington School in Columbus, Ohio, the first ASHG/NHGRI Genetics and Education Fellow. The 16-month appointment begins today. (2014-09-02)

Huma Rana, M.D., receives 2014 Richard King Award for best publication, Genetics in Medicine
Huma Q. Rana, M.D. of Harvard Medical School's Dana Farber Cancer Institute is the recipient of the 2014 Richard King Trainee Award. This award was instituted five years ago by the ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine to encourage ABMG or genetic counseling trainees in their careers and to foster the publication of the highest quality research in ACMG's peer-reviewed journal, Genetics in Medicine. (2014-04-04)

ASHG and NHGRI award genetics and public policy fellowship
The American Society of Human Genetics and the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, have named Katherine D. Blizinsky, Ph.D., a neuroscientist at Northwestern University in Chicago, the newest ASHG/NHGRI Genetics and Public Policy Fellow. The 16-month appointment begins today. (2014-09-02)

Patricia Hall, Ph.D., earns 2015 King Trainee Award for best publication, Genetics in Medicine
Patricia L. Hall, Ph.D., FACMG of Emory University is the recipient of the 2015 Richard King Trainee Award. This award was instituted by the ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine to encourage ABMGG, international equivalents or genetic counseling trainees in their careers and to foster the publication of the highest quality research in ACMG's peer-reviewed journal, Genetics in Medicine. (2015-03-25)

The Genetics Society of America announces DeLill Nasser Travel Award recipients
The Genetics Society of America is pleased to announce the six recipients of the 2010 DeLill Nasser Awards for Professional Development in Genetics. These travel grants are given to young geneticists to attend national and international meetings or enroll in laboratory courses. (2010-01-19)

Attention ladies and gentlemen: Courtship affects gene expression
Scientists from Texas have made an important step toward understanding human mating behavior by showing that certain genes become activated in fruit flies when they interact with the opposite sex. This research, published in the January 2011 issue of Genetics shows that courtship behaviors may be more influenced by genetics than previously thought. Understanding why and how these genes become activated within social contexts may also lead to insight into disorders such as autism. (2011-01-12)

Discovery may help to explain mystery of 'missing' genetic risk
A new study could help to answer an important riddle in our understanding of genetics: why research to look for the genetic causes of common diseases has failed to explain more than a fraction of the heritable risk of developing them. (2014-02-13)

PLOS Genetics Research Prize 2015 winner announced
The PLOS Genetics Editorial Board would like to congratulate the authors of the article chosen as the recipient of the PLOS Genetics Research Prize 2015. (2015-11-19)

ASHG 55th Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, October 26-29, 2005
The international genetics community will be represented by more than 4,000 scientists, clinicians, counselors and other professionals presenting their most recent research at the 55th annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics. (2005-09-07)

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center specialist in pediatrics and genetics named to two committees on national health policy
David L. Rimoin, M.D., Ph.D., has been appointed to serve on two committees that will influence national health policy over the next decade. He will co-chair The Strategic Planning Task Force on genetics and developmental biology for the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, an agency of the National Institutes of Health, and will also serve on The Clinical Research Round Table of the Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academy of Sciences. (2000-03-27)

American Society of Human Genetics to hold 2012 annual meeting, Nov. 6 to 10, in San Francisco
Over 6,000 scientists, medical geneticists and genetic counselors are expected to attend the ASHG annual meeting, the world's largest scientific conference on human genetics. (2012-07-28)

Is love at first sight real? Geneticists offer tantalizing clues
Leave it to geneticists to answer a question that has perplexed humanity since the dawn of time: does love at first sight truly exist? According to a study published in the April 2009 issue of the journal Genetics, scientists discovered that at the genetic level, some males and females are more compatible than others, and that this compatibility plays an important role in mate selection, mating outcomes and future reproductive behaviors. (2009-04-07)

Peter J. McGuire, M.B., B.Ch., is awarded the 2008-2009 Genzyme/ACMGF Clinical Genetics Fellowship
Peter J. McGuire, M.B., B.Ch., of Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York was honored as the 2008-2009 recipient of the Genzyme/ACMGF Clinical Genetics Fellowship in Biochemical Genetics at the ACMG 2008 Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting in Phoenix, Ariz. (2008-04-02)

Michigan State scholar leads effort to reform genetics instruction
Most middle-schoolers struggle to grasp the introductory concepts of genetics, a field of study considered crucial to advancing solutions to health problems and disease such as cancer, according to a study led by a Michigan State University researcher. (2011-08-05)

Why fad diets work well for some, but not others
Using fruit flies, researchers have found that genes interacting with diet, rather than diet alone, are the main cause of variation in metabolic traits, such as body weight. This helps explain why some diets work better for some people than others, and suggests that future diets should be tailored to an individual's genes rather than to physical appearance. (2010-07-28)

Research alliance to improve aquaculture and livestock breeding
The University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute and Hendrix Genetics, a global leader in animal breeding, have established a research agreement to improve the sustainability of animal production. (2016-08-23)

Nature or nurture? New epigenetic model blurs the line in the debate
A report published in the July 2009 issue of the journal Genetics complicates the debate over whether nature or nurture plays the most important role in complex diseases such as psychiatric disorders, heart disease and cancer. A University of California, Berkeley, scientist explains how epigenetics (temporary changes in gene function) and gene mutations (permanent, heritable changes) contribute to disease risk within populations, and lays the foundation for public health interventions to reduce environmental epigenetic changes. (2009-07-21)

Want to slow aging? New research suggests it takes more than antioxidants
A study published in the June 2010 issue of the journal Genetics casts doubt on the theory that oxidative stress shortens lifespan. Researchers from McGill University have identified mutations in 10 different genes of worms (genes believed to have counterparts in humans) that extend their lifespan without reducing the level of oxidative stress the worms suffer. The results contradict the popular theory that production of toxic reactive oxygen species in tissues is responsible for aging. (2010-07-06)

Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine: New open access journal launched by Wiley
John Wiley & Sons, Inc., today announced the launch of Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine (MGGM), a new Wiley Open Access journal. Under the leadership of Editor-in-Chief Dr. Maximilian Muenke, the journal will provide rapid dissemination of high-quality research in all areas of human, medical and molecular genetics. (2012-11-05)

Genes in Uniform: Don't Test, Don't Tell
Upon enlisting in the military, recruits must provide DNA samples for a master military DNA repository, and must submit to genetic tests that can be used to make decisions about eligibility for service and benefits. Please join the Genetics & Public Policy Center and former military personnel as they outline issues that surround military genetic testing. The seminar is on-the-record and open to the public. (2006-01-04)

Margarita Saenz, M.D., is recipient of Genzyme/ACMGF Fellowship in Biochemical Genetics
Margarita Sifuentes Saenz, M.D., a Medical Genetics Fellow at the Children's Hospital in Denver, Colo., was honored as the 2009-2010 recipient of the Genzyme/American College of Medical Genetics Foundation Clinical Genetics Fellowship in Biochemical Genetics at the ACMG 2009 Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting in Tampa, Fla. (2009-03-31)

Neng Chen, Ph.D., receives 2012 Richard King Trainee Award for best publication in GIM
Neng Chen, PhD is the recipient of the 2012 Richard King Trainee Award. This award was instituted three years ago by the ACMG Foundation to encourage ABMG trainees in their careers and to foster the publication of quality research in ACMG's peer-reviewed journal, Genetics in Medicine. Each year the editorial board reviews articles published in GIM by an ABMG trainee who was either a first or corresponding author. The manuscript felt to have the most merit is selected and a cash prize awarded. (2012-04-06)

New from Garland Science -- now available: 'Genetics and Genomics in Medicine'
Garland Science is proud to announce the publication of 'Genetics and Genomics in Medicine' by Tom Strachan, Judith Goodship, and Patrick Chinnery. (2014-06-09)

Jonathan Berg, M.D., Ph.D., awarded Richard King Trainee Award for Best in Genetics in Medicine
Jonathan Berg, M.D., Ph.D., is the inaugural recipient of the Richard King Trainee Award. This award was instituted last year by the American College of Medical Genetics Foundation to encourage ABMG trainees in their careers and to foster the publication of quality research in Genetics in Medicine. Each year the editorial board will review all articles published in GIM by an ABMG trainee who was either a first or corresponding author during that year. (2009-04-01)

Marwan Khaled Tayeh, Ph.D., is awarded the 2010 Richard King Trainee Award
Marwan Khaled Tayeh, Ph.D., is the recipient of the second annual Richard King Trainee Award. This award was instituted by the American College of Medical Genetics Foundation to encourage ABMG trainees in their careers and to foster the publication of quality research in Genetics in Medicine. (2010-04-05)

National Academy of Sciences recognizes Southampton genetics scientist
A UK scientist who has made groundbreaking discoveries in human genetics has been elected to the highly prestigious National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America. (2010-04-21)

Eight graduate students and postdocs receive GSA's DeLill Nasser Award
The Genetics Society of America (GSA) is proud to name eight early-career scientists -- four graduate students and four postdoctoral researchers -- as spring 2015 recipients of GSA's DeLill Nasser Award for Professional Development in Genetics. The award provides a $1,000 travel grant for each recipient to attend any national or international meeting, conference, or laboratory course that will enhance his or her career. (2015-01-07)

Gerald Fink awarded 2010 Gruber Genetics Prize
Whitehead Institute Founding Member Gerald Fink has been awarded the 2010 Genetics Prize of the Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation for his groundbreaking research in yeast genetics. (2010-06-30)

Drunken fruit flies help scientists find potential drug target for alcoholism
Drunken fruit flies have helped researchers from North Carolina State and Boston Universities identify networks of genes -- also present in humans -- that play a key role in alcohol drinking behavior. This discovery in the October 2009 Genetics provides an indication of why some people seem to tolerate alcohol better than others, and points toward a potential target for drugs aimed at preventing or eliminating alcoholism. (2009-11-03)

A bad biology grade sticks around
Researchers at Kansas State University have found that a low grade in a pre-requisite biology class predicts future student performance. (2013-05-31)

UCL to stage international conference on genes in sport
Scientists will look into the present and future role that genetics may play in sport at a one day international conference at University College London. (2001-11-13)

2007-2008 Genzyme/ACMGF Clinical Genetics Fellowship In Biochemical Genetics award winner announced
T. Andrew Burrow, M.D. of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center was honored as the 2007-2008 recipient of the Genzyme/ACMGF Clinical Genetics Fellowship in Biochemical Genetics at the ACMG 2007 Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting in Nashville, Tenn. (2007-07-17)

Click for Crick
The famous image of Watson and Crick with their DNA model will help developing nations participate in the debate about the next 50 years of genetics. James Watson and Francis Crick have signed an archive quality print which is being auctioned online. The proceeds will assist delegates from developing nations to join eight Nobel Laureates and hundreds of eminent speakers at the International Congress of Genetics in Melbourne Australia. (2003-03-17)

Scientists solve mystery of arsenic compound
Scientists have solved an important mystery about why an arsenic compound, arsenite, can kill us, and yet function as an effective therapeutic agent against disease and infections. Scientists from Johns Hopkins, Baylor and Stanford discovered that arsenite, a common water contaminant worldwide, affects a protein folding machine in yeast, called TCP, also present in humans. The findings open doors to developing safer therapeutic alternatives to arsenite-based medicines, and may allow researchers to counter arsenite poisoning. (2010-10-13)

UNC's Aravind Asokan to receive ASGCT 2013 Outstanding New Investigator Award
Aravind Asokan, Ph.D., assistant professor of genetics in the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, was selected by the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy to receive a 2013 Outstanding New Investigator Award. (2013-02-14)

YeastBook, the Eukaryotic Cell Encyclopedia is launched by Genetics
YeastBook, a new series of chapters published as articles that organize and analyze data on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, begins publication today in the journal Genetics, published by the Genetics Society of America. The series, resulting in a compendium of at least 50 chapters, will be authored by top geneticists and will cover most aspects of modern yeast research and its applications to human health. (2011-11-14)

ACMG 2013 Clinical Genetics Meeting -- Complimentary press registration is now open
From Genetic Testing to Whole Genome/Exome Sequencing, the focus of the ACMG Meeting is on the actual practice of genetics and genomics in healthcare today and in the future. The ACMG Annual Meeting attracts medical and scientific leaders from around the world who are working to apply research in genetics and the human genome to the diagnosis, management, treatment and prevention of genetic conditions and rare and common diseases. (2013-01-13)

More than fish bait: Worms unlock secrets to new epilepsy treatments
Scientists from the University of Alabama used worms to reel in information they hope will lead to a greater understanding of cellular mechanisms that may be exploited to treat epilepsy. In the journal Genetics, the researchers explain how the transparent roundworm, C. elegans, helped them identify key (2009-12-09)

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