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Gestures Current Events, Gestures News Articles.
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Bonobo and chimpanzee gestures share many meanings
If a bonobo and a chimpanzee were to meet face to face, they could probably understand each other's gestures. In an article publishing 27 February in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers from the Universities of St Andrews, York, and Kyoto have found that many of the gestures used by bonobos and chimpanzees share the same meanings. (2018-02-27)

Scientists reveal new technology that will help us compute more safely on the move
New research by University of Glasgow scientists that enables people to interact safely with mobile computers while walking, running or driving, could help to prevent users from putting themselves in danger. The research means that changing tracks on digital music players of the future while on the move could be done with the nod of the head. (2005-04-12)

Gesture recognition
A system that can recognize human gestures could provide a new way for people with physical disabilities to interact with computers. A related system for the able bodied could also be used to make virtual worlds more realistic. The system is described in detail in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of Arts and Technology. (2008-12-18)

Use of gestures reflects language instinct in young children
Young children instinctively use a 'language-like' structure to communicate through gestures, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research shows that when young children are asked to use gestures to communicate, their gestures segment information and reorganize it into language-like sequences. (2014-06-05)

Sending mixed messages improves math instruction
Researchers at the University of Chicago have come up with a technique for teachers to use that increases student understanding of mathematics: explain how to solve a problem in one way, and also provide an alternative approach through gesture. Students who were taught to solve arithmetic problems by teachers using mismatched gesture and speech learned twice as well as students who received instruction in speech only. (2005-02-15)

The power of making amends
A new study from researchers at the University of Miami reveals how conciliatory gestures promote human forgiveness. Their findings show that peacemaking efforts such as apologies, offers of compensation and owning up to one's responsibility increase forgiveness--and reduce anger--by making the aggressor seem more valuable as a relationship partner and by causing the victim to feel less at risk of getting hurt again by the transgressor. (2014-07-14)

Gesturing while talking helps change your thoughts
Sometimes it's almost impossible to talk without using your hands. These gestures seem to be important to how we think. They provide a visual clue to our thoughts and, a new theory suggests, may even change our thoughts by grounding them in action. (2011-01-05)

Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control
University of Washington engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that lets users 'train' their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone. (2014-09-19)

Why do we gesticulate?
If you rely on hand gestures to get your point across, you can thank fish for that! Scientists have found that the evolution of the control of speech and hand movements can be traced back to the same place in the brain, which could explain why we use hand gestures when we are speaking. (2013-07-02)

Scientists unlock secret of how the brain encodes speech
People like the late Stephen Hawking are unable to speak because their muscles are paralyzed. Scientists want to help these individuals communicate by developing a brain machine interface to decode the commands the brain is sending to the tongue, palate, lips and larynx. New research has moved science closer by unlocking new information about how the brain encodes speech. They discovered the brain controls speech in a similar way to how it controls arm movements. (2018-09-26)

New technology uses mouth gestures to interact in virtual reality
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a new technology that allows users to interact in a virtual reality environment using only mouth gestures. (2017-10-05)

Guiding light: Skoltech technology puts a light-painting drone at your fingertips
Skoltech researchers have designed and developed an interface that allows a user to direct a small drone to light-paint patterns or letters through hand gestures. The new interface, DroneLight, can be used in distant communications, entertainment, and even search and rescue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdnIqLjtGeU&feature=emb_logo (2020-09-23)

Force Push VR brings Jedi powers to life
Force Push provides a more physical, nuanced experience than traditional hand controllers allow in VR. It responds to the speed and magnitude of hand gestures to accelerate or decelerate objects in a way that users can understand intuitively. (2018-11-30)

How similar are the gestures of apes and human infants? More than you might suspect
Psychologists analyzing video of a female chimpanzee, a female bonobo and a female human infant child in a study to compare different types of gestures at comparable stages of communicative development found remarkable similarities among the three species. (2013-06-06)

Hand gestures improve learning in both signers and speakers
Spontaneous gesture can help children learn, whether they use a spoken language or sign language, according to a new report. (2014-08-18)

Orangutans' communication resembles a game of 'charades'
When orangutans use gestures to get their point across, they rely on the same basic strategy that people follow in playing the game of charades. Captive orangutans intentionally modify or repeat hand or other signals selectively based on the success or failure of their first attempt, according to a Aug. 2 study in Current Biology, a publication of Cell Press. (2007-08-01)

Presidential debates say as much about US culture as candidates
American presidential campaigns provide a unique window into our society, according to a University of Michigan anthropologist. (2012-10-16)

That new baby isn't imitating you
For decades, there have been studies suggesting that human babies are capable of imitating facial gestures, hand gestures, facial expressions, or vocal sounds right from their first weeks of life after birth. But, based on new evidence, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on May 5, 2016 now say that just isn't so. (2016-05-05)

Referential-gesture communication in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)
Humans commonly use referential gestures that direct the attention of recipients to particular aspects of the environment. Because the recipient of a referential gesture must infer the signaler's meaning, the use of these gestures has been linked with cognitive capacities such as the ability to recognize another individual's mental state. Researchers have now found evidence that such referential gesturing is a natural part of chimpanzee behavior. (2006-03-20)

Aboriginal kids can count without numbers
Knowing the words for numbers is not necessary to be able to count, according to a new study of aboriginal children by UCL (University College London) and the University of Melbourne. The study of the aboriginal children -- from two communities which do not have words or gestures for numbers -- found that they were able to copy and perform number-related tasks. The findings, published in the journal PNAS, suggest that we possess an innate mechanism for counting, which may develop differently in children with dyscalculia. (2008-08-18)

Gestures and visual animations reveal cognitive origins of linguistic meaning
Gestures and visual animations can help reveal the cognitive origins of meaning, indicating that our minds can assign a linguistic structure to new informational content 'on the fly' -- even if it is not linguistic in nature. (2019-04-25)

Words, gestures are translated by same brain regions, says new research
Researchers have shown that the brain regions that have long been recognized as a center in which spoken or written words are decoded are also important in interpreting wordless gestures. The findings suggest that these brain regions may play a much broader role in the interpretation of symbols than researchers have thought and, for this reason, could be the evolutionary starting point from which language originated. (2009-11-09)

Battery-free technology brings gesture recognition to all devices
University of Washington computer scientists have built a low-cost gesture recognition system that runs without batteries and lets users control their electronic devices hidden from sight with simple hand movements. The prototype, called 'AllSee,' uses existing TV signals as both a power source and the means for detecting a user's gesture command. (2014-02-27)

Do as i say: Translating language into movement
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a computer model that can translate text describing physical movements directly into simple computer-generated animations, a first step toward someday generating movies directly from scripts. (2019-09-10)

New dog, old tricks? Stray dogs can understand human cues
Pet dogs are highly receptive to commands from their owners. But is this due to their training or do dogs have an innate ability to understand human signals? A new study finds that 80% of untrained stray dogs successfully followed pointing directions from people to a specific location. The results suggest that dogs can understand and respond to complex gestures without any training, meaning that dogs may have an innate connection to human behaviors. (2020-01-17)

3-D display screen on mobile devices could be on the horizon
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have developed a new type of screen display that not only moves but also physically tilts. (2012-09-20)

Robots sense human touch using camera and shadows
Cornell University researchers have created a low-cost method for soft, deformable robots to detect a range of physical interactions, from pats to punches to hugs, without relying on touch at all. Instead, a USB camera located inside the robot captures the shadow movements of hand gestures on the robot's skin and classifies them with machine-learning software. (2021-02-08)

Surgeons may use hand gestures to manipulate MRI images in OR
Doctors may soon be using a system in the operating room that recognizes hand gestures as commands to tell a computer to browse and display medical images of the patient during a surgery. (2013-01-10)

Sport-related concussions
Concussions are a regular occurrence in sport but more so in contact sports such as American football, ice hockey or soccer. The problem of diagnosing concussion is often complicated if the collision happens during a competition or training. Dr. Ingo Helmich's current study suggests clear markers for a diagnostic criterion. Helmich has been able to show that nonverbal hand movements differ between athletes with and without concussion. (2019-12-09)

Children with brain lesions able to use gestures important to language learning
Children with brain lesions suffered before or around the time of birth are able to use gestures -- an important aspect of the language learning process -- to convey simple sentences. (2013-02-20)

The components of imitation
We learn many things through imitation: how to walk, sports, and even more. What are the processes in the brain responsible for imitation? For some years now, science has been examining the role of mirror neurons, but there is still much to understand. One study focusing on neurological patients showed that at least two components are involved in imitating gestures, each from a different hemisphere of the brain. The study, which SISSA participated in, was published in Neuropsychologia. (2015-12-22)

UCLA researchers show that culture influences brain cells
The brain's mirror neuron network responds differently depending on whether we are looking at someone who shares our culture, or someone who doesn't. (2007-07-17)

Dartmouth-led team develops WristWhirl, a smartwatch prototype using wrist as a joystick
Checking email, tracking fitness, and listening to music, are just a few things that a smartwatch can do but what if your hands aren't free? A Dartmouth-led team has come up with a solution by developing WristWhirl -- a smartwatch prototype that uses the wrist wearing the watch as an always-available joystick to perform common touch screen gestures with one-handed continuous input. (2016-10-14)

Oxytocin promotes social behavior in infant rhesus monkeys
The hormone oxytocin appears to increase social behaviors in newborn rhesus monkeys, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the University of Parma in Italy, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The findings indicate that oxytocin is a promising candidate for new treatments for developmental disorders affecting social skills and bonding. (2014-04-28)

Computerized map responds to speech and gestures
Penn State researchers have developed a prototype system to help visitors locate campus parking lots and buildings by talking with a computer-controlled map that responds not only to the spoken word but also to natural hand gestures. (1999-08-19)

Future surgeons may use robotic nurse, 'gesture recognition'
Surgeons of the future might use a system that recognizes hand gestures as commands to control a robotic scrub nurse or tell a computer to display medical images of the patient during an operation. (2011-02-03)

Despite negative consequences, benevolent sexism helps in search for mate
Some women may like it when a man opens the door on a first date or offers to pay the bill at dinner, while others may find the gestures insulting. New research provides an alternative explanation as to why some women respond positively. (2018-07-25)

Monkey lip smacks provide new insights into the evolution of human speech
Scientists have traditionally sought the evolutionary origins of human speech in primate vocalizations. But unlike these primate calls, human speech is produced using movements of the tongue, lips and jaw. Speech is also learned, while primate vocalizations are mostly innately structured. New research published in Current Biology by W. Tecumseh Fitch, Department of Cognitive Biology of the University of Vienna, supports the idea that human speech evolved less from vocalizations than from communicative facial gestures. (2012-05-31)

The art of storytelling: researchers explore why we relate to characters
For thousands of years, humans have relied on storytelling to engage, to share emotions and to relate personal experiences. Now, psychologists at McMaster University are exploring the mechanisms deep within the brain to better understand just what happens when we communicate. (2018-09-13)

How similar are the gestures of apes and human infants? More than you might suspect
A new study published in Frontiers used naturalistic video data for the first time to compare gestures in a female chimpanzee, bonobo and human infant. (2013-06-06)

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