Hydraulic Fracturing Current Events | Page 2

Hydraulic Fracturing Current Events, Hydraulic Fracturing News Articles.
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Federal research significant in environmental rule-making
Federally-sponsored science plays a more significant role in bringing together stakeholders and facilitating environmental governance debates than all other types of research, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-04-29)

Location of wastewater disposal drives induced seismicity at US oil sites
The depth of the rock layer that serves as the disposal site for wastewater produced during unconventional oil extraction plays a significant role in whether that disposal triggers earthquakes in the US, according to a new study that takes a broad look at the issue. (2018-10-31)

Studies link earthquakes to fracking in the central and eastern US
Small earthquakes in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Texas can be linked to hydraulic fracturing wells in those regions, according to researchers speaking at the SSA 2019 Annual Meeting. (2019-04-26)

Gas leaks from faulty wells linked to contamination in some groundwater
A study has pinpointed the likely source of most natural gas contamination in drinking-water wells associated with hydraulic fracturing, and it's not the source many people may have feared. (2014-09-15)

Study finds 6,600 spills from fracking in just 4 states
Each year, 2 to 16 percent of hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells spill hydrocarbons, chemical-laden water, hydraulic fracturing fluids and other substances, according to a new study. The analysis, which appears Feb. 21 in Environmental Science & Technology, identified 6,648 spills reported across Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota and Pennsylvania during a 10-year period. (2017-02-21)

Hazardous chemicals go unregulated in routine oil and gas operations
California requires oil and gas producers to disclose chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing activities, enabling scientific and public scrutiny of potential environmental and human health hazards. But all existing disclosure regulations cover chemical use only in hydraulic fracturing, and, in California, two other types of well-stimulation treatments. Many of the same chemicals used for hydraulic fracturing go undisclosed when used in routine oil- and gas-field activities such as well drilling, cleaning and maintenance. (2017-04-19)

Hydrocarbon storage, fracking and lightning risk
Fires caused by lightning strikes on hydrocarbon storage plants are a century-old, yet to be addressed, problem, according to research to be published in the International Journal of Forensic Engineering. In the era of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, this is becoming an even more poignant issue for the fossil fuel industry. (2016-03-14)

Fracking in Michigan: U-M researchers study potential impact on health, environment, economy
University of Michigan researchers are conducting a detailed study of the potential environmental and societal effects of hydraulic fracturing, the controversial natural gas drilling process known as fracking. (2012-11-28)

Fracking chemical may interfere with male sex hormone receptor
A chemical used in hydraulic fracturing, commonly called fracking, has the potential to interfere with reproductive hormones in men, according to research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-31)

Oil and gas wastewater disposal may harm West Virginia waterways
Unconventional oil and gas operations combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking,' to release natural gas and oil from underground rock. Studies have centered on potential water pollution from this process that may increase endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface and ground water. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri report high levels of EDC activity in the surface water near a hydraulic fracturing wastewater disposal facility in West Virginia. (2016-04-07)

New tracers can identify frac fluids in the environment
Scientists have developed new geochemical tracers that can identify hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment. (2014-10-20)

Shallow fracking raises questions for water, new Stanford research shows
Stanford scientist's investigations show that drinking water sources may be threatened by thousands of shallow oil and gas wells mined with the controversial process of hydraulic fracturing. A new study suggests safeguards. (2015-07-21)

Man-made earthquake risk reduced if fracking is 895m from faults
The risk of man-made earthquakes due to fracking is greatly reduced if high-pressure fluid injection used to crack underground rocks is 895m away from faults in the Earth's crust, according to new research. (2018-02-27)

Natural gas from shale contributes to global warming
Natural gas extracted from shale formations has a greater greenhouse gas footprint -- in the form of methane emissions -- than conventional gas, oil and coal over a 20 year period. This calls into question the logic of its use as a climate-friendly alternative to fossil fuels, according to Robert Howarth and colleagues, from Cornell University in New York. Their work is published online in Springer's journal, Climatic Change Letters. (2011-04-12)

Fracking report a 'road map' to safer energy production
A new report to California lawmakers on hydraulic fracturing provides an important road map for scientists as they strive to produce energy while protecting human health and the environment, according to a scientist with appointments at University of the Pacific and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who helped author the study. (2015-07-13)

Residual hydraulic fracturing water not a risk to groundwater
Hydraulic fracturing -- fracking or hydrofracturing -- raises many concerns about potential environmental impacts, especially water contamination. Currently, data show that the majority of water injected into wells stays underground, triggering fears that it might find its way into groundwater. New research by a team of scientists should help allay those fears. (2014-09-10)

Analysis of Marcellus flowback finds high levels of ancient brines
Brine water that flows back from gas wells in the Marcellus Shale region after hydraulic fracturing is many times more salty than seawater, with high contents of various elements, including radium and barium. The chemistry is consistent with brines formed during the Paleozoic era, a study by an undergraduate student and two professors in Penn State's Department of Geosciences found. (2012-12-18)

More environmental rules needed for shale gas, says Stanford geophysicist
In his State of the Union address, President Barack Obama praised the potential of the country's tremendous supply of natural gas buried in shale. But the (2012-02-06)

New tracers can identify frack fluids in the environment
Duke scientists have developed geochemical tracers to identify hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment. The tracers have been field-tested at two sites and can distinguish fracking fluids from wastewater versus conventional wells or other sources. They give scientists new forensic tools to detect if fracking fluids are escaping into water supplies and what risks, if any, they might pose. (2014-10-20)

Exposure to chemicals released during fracking may harm fertility
Scientific studies, while ongoing, are still inconclusive on the potential long-term effects fracking has on human development. Today, researchers at the University of Missouri released a study that is the first of its kind to link exposure to chemicals released during hydraulic fracturing to adverse reproductive and developmental outcomes in mice. Scientists believe that exposure to these chemicals also could pose a threat to human development. (2016-08-25)

How backhoes get the shakes
Backhoes are widely used machines with hydraulic shovels and buckets operated by mechanical controls. That combination can give rise to some unexpected vibration problems. (2003-11-18)

Researchers link methane in groundwater in Parker and Hood counties to natural sources
Scientists from The University of Texas at Austin have found that high levels of methane in well water from two counties near Fort Worth are probably from shallow natural gas deposits, not natural gas leaks caused by hydraulic fracturing operations in the underlying Barnett Shale. (2017-03-08)

Fracking and Health Impact Assessments -- IOM hosts workshop April 30 and May 1
Public health was not part of the initial discussions about shale gas extraction and as a result there is little information about any health impacts of the technologies and process. (2012-04-20)

Draft U-M report analyzes policy options for hydraulic fracturing in Michigan
University of Michigan researchers today released a detailed draft analysis of policy options for hydraulic fracturing, the natural gas and oil extraction process commonly known as fracking. (2015-02-20)

Hydraulic fracturing linked to increases in hospitalization rates in the Marcellus Shale
Hospitalizations for heart conditions, neurological illness, and other conditions were higher among people who live near unconventional gas and oil drilling (hydraulic fracturing), according to new research from Pennsylvania and Columbia, published in PLOS ONE. Over the past ten years in the United States, hydraulic fracturing has experienced a meteoric increase. Due to substantial increases in well drilling, potential for air and water pollution posing a health threat has been a concern for nearby residents. (2015-07-15)

Researchers work to fingerprint hydrofracking water quality
A Syracuse University study aims to develop new tools to detect possible groundwater contamination associated with shale-bed methane production in the Appalachian Basin. (2015-12-09)

Temporary oilfield workers are major factor in increased water use in N. Dakota Bakken region
Increased water use in the rapidly growing oil industry in North Dakota's Bakken oil shale region, or play, is surprisingly due not only to oil well development but also to people, according to a recent study. Increased oil development in that region has attracted thousands of oilfield employees. (2016-05-20)

Swapping water for CO2 could make fracking greener and more effective
Scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and China University of Petroleum (Beijing) have demonstrated that CO2 may make a better hydraulic fracturing (fracking) fluid than water. Their research, published May 30 in the journal Joule, could help pave the way for a more eco-friendly form of fracking that would double as a mechanism for storing captured atmospheric CO2. (2019-05-30)

Research digs deep into the fracking controversy
The research will be presented April 14 at the annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers in Seattle. (2011-04-11)

Squeezing every drop of fresh water from waste brine
Engineers at the University of California, Riverside have developed a new way to recover almost 100 percent of the water from highly concentrated salt solutions. The system will alleviate water shortages in arid regions and reduce concerns surrounding high salinity brine disposal, such as hydraulic fracturing waste. (2017-05-29)

Inadequate state oil and gas regulations threaten groundwater resources, study finds
Definitions of 'protected groundwater' in 17 state oil and gas regulations are inconsistent and less protective than federal regulations used by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), according to a study published Friday, March 2, 2018 in Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health. The findings demonstrate the nation's water supply is vulnerable to contamination from oil and gas production and wastewater disposal despite federal protections for groundwater. (2018-03-05)

Acid mine drainage reduces radioactivity in fracking waste
Blending fracking wastewater with acid mine drainage causes most of the naturally radioactive metals in the fracking water to precipitate into a solid for disposal. The practice also could help reduce the depletion of local freshwater resources by giving drillers a source of usable recycled water for the hydraulic fracturing process. (2014-01-09)

New contaminants found in oil and gas wastewater
Duke University scientists have documented high levels of two potentially hazardous contaminants, ammonium and iodide, in wastewater being discharged into area streams and rivers from oil and gas operations in Pennsylvania. Levels of contamination were just as high in wastewater coming from conventional oil and gas wells as from hydraulically fractured shale gas wells. (2015-01-14)

Household phenomenon observed by Leonardo da Vinci finally explained by Cambridge research
Since the 1820s scientists have believed that hydraulic jumps occur partly as a result of the gravitational pull. But a paper published in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics has disproved this longstanding theory. (2018-08-07)

Marcellus brine migration likely natural, not man-made
A Duke University study of well water in northeastern Pennsylvania suggests that naturally occurring pathways could have allowed salts and gases from the Marcellus shale formation deep underground to migrate up into shallow drinking water aquifers. The study found elevated levels of salinity with similar geochemistry to deep Marcellus brine in drinking water samples from three groundwater aquifers, but no direct links between the salinity and shale gas exploration in the region. (2012-07-09)

Going with the flow: Caltech researchers find compaction bands in sandstone are permeable
When geologists survey an area of land for the potential that gas or petroleum deposits could exist there, they must take into account the composition of rocks that lie below the surface. Previous research had suggested that compaction bands might act as barriers to the flow of oil or gas. Now, researchers led by Caltech researchers have analyzed X-ray images of sandstone and revealed that compaction bands are actually more permeable than earlier models indicated. (2011-06-06)

New book offers comprehensive look at fracturing horizontal wells
Fracturing horizontal wells has had a profound impact on the US oil and gas industry over the past 25 years, allowing production from fields once considered too marginal to produce. A new book, 'Fracturing Horizontal Wells,' translates that history and the lessons learned into a comprehensive look at the process, from planning to production. (2016-08-15)

Is your drinking water toxic? This app may help you find out
Since fracking sites use a diverse mix of chemical ingredients, often individuals and researchers are in the dark about the health consequences of living near a particular well. Now, a new, interactive tool created by Penn Medicine researchers allows community members and scientists to find out which toxins may be lurking in their drinking water. (2020-09-22)

The power of film
Researcher at the University of Iowa is the first to use the Internet and social media to systematically show how a documentary film shaped public perception and ultimately led to municipal bans on hydraulic fracking. (2015-09-02)

Report finds additional radioactive materials in gas-well drill cuttings
Hydraulic fracturing has boosted US energy production while coming under scrutiny for its potential environmental impacts, mostly related to the wastewater the method generates. Now, a report in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters takes a look at solid waste from horizontal gas wells. The study found that some well waste from the Marcellus shale in Pennsylvania contained radioactive material not previously reported, with the potential for leaching from landfills into the environment. (2016-12-21)

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