Leukemia Cells Current Events

Leukemia Cells Current Events, Leukemia Cells News Articles.
Sort By: Most Viewed | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
The genetics of MLL leukemogenesis
In the Nov. 1 issue of G&D, Dr. Michael Cleary and colleagues identify the gene Meis1 as a critical player in the establishment of leukemia stem cells, and the development of MLL leukemia. (2007-10-16)

Researchers pinpoint potential enzyme for T-cell leukemia treatment
For the first time, researchers at Boston University have shown that T-cell leukemia cells use a particular cycle, called the TCA or Kreb cycle, to support their growth and survival. (2016-02-22)

To prevent leukemia's dreaded return, go for the stem cells
Researchers reporting in the April Cell Stem Cell, a Cell Press publication, have found a way to stop leukemia stem cells in their tracks. The advance in mice suggests that a combination approach to therapy might stamp out chronic myeloid leukemia for good. (2012-04-05)

For first time in 40 years, cure for acute leukemia within reach
Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most aggressive cancers. While other cancers have benefitted from new treatments, there has been no encouraging news for most leukemia patients for the past 40 years. Until now. As published today in the scientific journal Cell, Professor Yinon Ben-Neriah and his research team at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU)'s Faculty of Medicine have developed a new biological drug with a cure rate of 50 percent for lab mice with acute leukemia. (2018-08-24)

A potential new way to make a good anti-leukemia drug even better
A recently identified cancer-causing protein makes the anti-leukemia drug imatinib, less effective. By blocking the protein, an international team of researchers was able to slow the spread of leukemia cells in culture. The study, which will appear online on Oct. 20 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that the most effective treatment for leukemia may rely on a combination of targeted drugs, rather than a single miracle drug. (2008-10-20)

Key gene in leukemia discovered
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common forms of blood cancer among adults and is associated with a low survival rate, and leads to the inhibition of normal blood formation. Now, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has identified one of the genes that is the basis for leukemia stem cells' survival and multiplication. The study is published in Cell Reports. (2020-06-03)

Therapy targets leukemia stem cells
New research takes aim at stubborn cancer stem cells that are thought to be responsible for treatment resistance and relapse. The study, published by Cell Press in the Feb. 14 issue of the journal Cancer Cell, provides insight into mechanisms associated with the survival of leukemia stem cells and identifies a potential therapeutic target that is specific for these dangerously persistent cells. (2012-02-13)

Study determines efficacy of 2 drugs to treat a form of leukemia
Researchers have determined that two Phase 1 drugs (CX-4945 and JQ1) can work together to efficiently kill T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells while having minimal impact on normal blood cells. (2016-10-24)

Noncoding RNA CCDC26 regulates KIT expression
A long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), which might give an impact on tyrosine kinase-targeted leukemia therapy, was found to be expressed in a leukemia cell line. The function of the lncRNA CCDC26 is not fully understood; however, researchers at Hiroshima University revealed the mechanisms by which CCDC26 controls the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT expression. The results provide new insights into leukemia recurrence and may help to develop new leukemia therapies. (2015-06-01)

Fish oil may hold key to leukemia cure
A compound produced from fish oil that appears to target leukemia stem cells could lead to a cure for the disease, according to Penn State researchers. (2011-12-22)

Gene therapy protocol at UCSD activates immune system in patients with leukemia
A research team at the Moores Cancer Center at University of California, San Diego reports that patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who were treated with a gene therapy protocol began making antibodies that reacted against their own leukemia cells. The study will be published on line the week of Feb. 11-15 in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. (2008-02-11)

Baking soda treatment may help prevent leukemia relapse after stem cell transplants
Scientists have discovered that sodium bicarbonate - also known as baking soda or bicarbonate of soda - can reprogram T cells in leukemia patients to resist the immune-suppressing effects of cancer cells, which can drive leukemia relapse after stem cell transplants. (2020-10-28)

A small subset of normal white blood cells gives rise to a rare leukemia, study shows
New research has identified a small subset of normal white blood cells in the body that can give rise to large granular lymphocyte leukemia, a rare incurable form of leukemia. The disease occurs in white blood cells called NKT cells, immune cells that share features of T lymphocytes and features of natural killer (NK) cells. (2011-03-01)

Gene loss causes leukemia
Researchers from VIB and K.U.Leuven, both in Flanders, Belgium, have discovered a new factor in the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a disease that mainly affects children. In the cells of the patients, the specific gene PTPN2 ceases to function, causing the cancer cells to survive longer and grow faster. The study provides genetic and functional evidence for a tumor suppressor role of PTPN2. (2010-05-17)

Understanding the emergence of leukemia
Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia is a rare type of blood cancer that affects mostly children. This blood cancer appears from the precursor cells that produce T lymphocytes (a type of white blood cells). A new study from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia, conducted in mice, shows that leukemia can emerge as a consequence of prolonging the presence of precursor cells in the thymus. This work was now published in the scientific journal The Journal of Immunology. (2019-01-25)

Identified an 'alarm clock' of a leukemia-causing oncogene
Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, led by Manel Esteller have shown that mutations in DNMT3A gene cause MEIS1 activacion, triggering leukemia. The study results are published in the journal Oncogene. (2015-10-08)

Peptide vaccine can produce complete remission in myeloid leukemia patients
The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center offers these news items presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH). (2004-12-06)

An epigenetic lesion could be responsible for acute T-cell leukemia
Researchers from the Epigenetics and Cancer Biology Program (PEBC) led by Dr. Manel Esteller at IDIBELL have discovered how an epigenetic lesion can lead to T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The article, published in the journal Leukemia, correlates the lesion with the activation of a powerful oncogen capable of malignizing this type of cells of the immune system. (2017-03-30)

A promising new approach for treating leukemia discovered
A group of researchers at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) of Université de Montréal discovered a promising new approach to treating leukemia by disarming a gene that is responsible for tumor progression. (2014-02-13)

Protein responsible for Leukemia's aggressiveness identified
Researchers have identified a protein critical for the aggressiveness of T-cell leukemia, a subtype of leukemia that afflicts children and adults. (2018-04-27)

Huntsman Cancer Institute illuminates potential new treatment in acute myeloid leukemia
In a study published in the journal Leukemia, lead author Ami Patel, MD, Huntsman Cancer Institute researcher and assistant professor in the Division of Hematology and Hematologic Malignancies at the University of Utah, showed that factors produced by bone marrow support cells allowed leukemia cells to survive treatment with quizartinib, a type of TKI. When quizartinib was combined with another TKI called dasatinib the alternative survival pathways were shut down, leading to more effective leukemia cell death. (2020-07-31)

Combination therapy targets stubborn leukemia stem cells
New research discovers a combination of drugs that may prove to be a more effective treatment for a lethal form of leukemia. The study, published by Cell Press in the May issue of the journal Cancer Cell, reports that the new therapeutic strategy effectively targets notoriously intractable leukemia stem cells that often escape standard treatment and are a main factor in disease relapse. (2010-05-17)

'Modular' leukemia drug shows promise in early testing
A new type of engineered drug candidate has shown promise in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia in both test tube and early animal tests, a new study shows. The agent represents a new class of agents called small modular immunopharmaceuticals. Called CD37-SMIP, the agent targets a protein called CD37 on the surface of these leukemia cells. (2007-06-28)

Therapies for ALL and AML targeting MER receptor hold promise of more effect with less side-effect
Two University of Colorado Cancer Center studies show that the protein receptor Mer is overexpressed in many leukemias, and that inhibition of this Mer receptor results in the death of leukemia cells -- without affecting surrounding, healthy cells. (2013-03-11)

Cancer research: Targeted elimination of leukemic stem cells
Cancer research in Bern has discovered a further mechanism to combat leukemia: a research team at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern has succeeded in identifying an important signaling pathway for regulating leukemic stem cells. With this discovery, the researchers are expanding the arsenal of potentially highly effective drugs against leukemia. (2021-02-16)

Monoclonal antibody achieves best results for chronic lymphocytic leukemia
Pairing chemotherapy with the new monoclonal antibody, Rituximab, delivers the most effective treatment yet for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, say researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. (2003-06-03)

Possible new approach to treating deadly leukemia in babies
A Loyola University Health System study points to a promising new approach to treating an aggressive and usually fatal leukemia in babies. The study involved a type of leukemia called mixed lineage leukemia, or MLL. Only 25 to 50 percent of babies diagnosed with MLL leukemia survive the disease. (2011-04-12)

Metoclopramide inhibits proliferation of leukemia stem cells
A research team at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern has identified and tested the use of an agent that can effectively inhibit the proliferation of leukemia stem cells. Metoclopramide (MPR), used as an anti-emetic medication, interrupts the unique CD93 signaling pathway that only leukemia stem cells use to proliferate. This opens up a therapeutic approach using MPR to selectively eliminate leukemia stem cells. (2021-01-26)

Pediatric cancers: Why some forms of leukemia only affect children
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mainly affects children, with the prognosis often being poor despite several decades of research into more effective treatments. A new study explains why some forms of leukemia develop in very young children and identifies therapeutic targets. (2019-10-29)

Protein loss plays role in acute T-cell leukemia
The loss of a key protein (Smad3) in a pathway that helps prevent tumors from forming is specific to one form of childhood leukemia, but not to other pediatric and adult forms of leukemia, according to a new study published in the August 5, 2004, New England Journal of Medicine*. (2004-08-04)

Researchers at CHLA receive grant to study new way of battling resistant
Yong-Mi Kim, MD, PhD, of The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has been awarded a 3 year translational research program grant from the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society to study a novel approach to eradicating minimal residual disease in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. (2016-11-10)

Tracking down the origin of leukemia relapse
The cancer cells that reign during relapses of an aggressive human leukemia are different from those that dominated the original disease, according to a paper published online on April 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. (2011-04-04)

Scientists develop new precise therapeutic leukemia vaccine
Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University have developed a new type of precise therapeutic vaccine against leukemia. It utilizes self-healing polylactic acid microcapsules for co-encapsulating a new epitope peptide and PD-1 antibody. (2020-10-12)

Knocking out survival protein could aid leukemia treatment
An effective way to fight leukemia might be to knock out a specific protein that protects cancer cells from dying, a new study shows. The findings suggest that a drug that can block this (2007-04-20)

Canadian researchers find potential new leukemia treatment with old antibiotic drug
Clinician-scientists in the Princess Margaret Cancer Program have found a promising approach to treating leukemia, using an old drug in a new way. (2011-11-14)

$5 million grant awarded to U.VA health system targets leukemia drug development, creates new jobs
A research team at the University of Virginia Health System has been awarded a five-year, $5 million grant to develop new targeted drug treatments for leukemia, or cancer of the blood. (2004-10-06)

Lipids help to fight leukemia
T cells use a novel mechanism to fight leukemia. They may recognize unique lipids produced by cancer cells and kill tumor cells expressing these lipid molecules. A study conducted by researchers at the University of Basel shows that a tumor-associated lipid stimulates specific T cells, which efficiently kill leukemia cells both in vitro and in animal models. The results have been published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. (2014-06-16)

Scientists discover molecular target for treatment of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia
A new research study identifies the molecular events that contribute to a notoriously treatment-resistant form of T cell leukemia. The findings reveal that disruption of immune cell differentiation is central to disease progression and provide new avenues for development of future therapeutics. (2004-06-14)

Study of cancer cell metabolism yields new insights on leukemia
University of Rochester Medical Center scientists have proposed a new reason why acute myeloid leukemia, one of the most aggressive cancers, is so difficult to cure: A subset of cells that drive the disease appear to have a much slower metabolism than most other tumors cells. (2013-01-17)

UC San Diego researcher receives $6.25 million grant
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society has awarded Thomas J. Kipps, M.D., Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with a 5-year, $6.25 million Specialized Center of Research program grant to support research on chronic lymphocytic leukemia. (2013-10-14)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.