MRI Current Events

MRI Current Events, MRI News Articles.
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Not just images
Hebrew University scientists have successfully transformed an MRI from a diagnostic camera into a device that can record changes in the biological makeup of brain tissue. The development will help doctors understand whether a patient is merely aging or developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. (2019-09-05)

Researchers use MRI to predict Alzheimer's disease
MRI brain scans perform better than common clinical tests at predicting which people will go on to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study. (2018-11-20)

Does MRI plus mammography improve detection of new breast cancer after breast conservation therapy?
A new article published by JAMA Oncology compares outcomes for combined mammography and MRI or ultrasonography screenings for new breast cancers in women who have previously undergone breast conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer initially diagnosed at 50 or younger. (2017-06-22)

During infancy, neurons are still finding their places
Researchers have identified a large population of previously unrecognized young neurons that migrate in the human brain during the first few months of life, contributing to the expansion of the frontal lobe, a region important for social behavior and executive function. (2016-10-06)

Researchers create 'MRI' of the sun's interior motions
A team of scientists has created an (2012-07-09)

High-precision magnetic field sensing
Scientists have developed a highly sensitive sensor to detect tiny changes in strong magnetic fields. The sensor may find widespread use in medicine and other areas. (2016-12-02)

Hormone can enhance brain activity associated with love and sex
The hormone kisspeptin can enhance activity in brain regions associated with sexual arousal and romantic love, according to new research. (2017-01-23)

Sussex research reveals brain mechanism involved in language learning
Psychologists found that when we learn the names of unfamiliar objects, brain regions involved in learning actively predict the objects the names correspond to. (2018-03-15)

Newborn baby brain scans will help scientists track brain development
Scientists have today published ground-breaking scans of newborn babies' brains which researchers from all over the world can download and use to study how the human brain develops. (2017-05-09)

MRI findings shed light on multiple sclerosis
New magnetic resonance imaging research shows that changes in brain blood flow associated with vein abnormalities are not specific for multiple sclerosis and do not contribute to its severity, despite what some researchers have speculated. (2012-08-21)

One-third of breast cancer patients not getting appropriate breast imaging follow-up exam
An annual mammogram is recommended after treatment for breast cancer, but nearly one-third of women diagnosed with breast cancer aren't receiving this follow-up exam, according to new findings presented at the 2016 Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons. (2016-10-19)

New brain mapping technique highlights relationship between connectivity and IQ
A new and relatively simple technique for mapping the wiring of the brain has shown a correlation between how well connected an individual's brain regions are and their intelligence, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2018-01-02)

Talk to the hand
Fans of the blockbuster movie 'Iron Man 3' might remember the characters step inside the digital projection of a 'big brain' and watch as groups of neurons are 'lit up' along the brain's neural 'map' in response to physical touch. Now, much like that scene, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered a new insight into how the complex neural map of the human brain operates. (2019-11-05)

Surgery to remove unaffected breast in early breast cancer increases
The proportion of women in the United States undergoing surgery for early-stage breast cancer who have preventive mastectomy to remove the unaffected breast increased significantly in recent years, particularly among younger women, and varied substantially across states. (2017-03-29)

New technique improves outcome for living donor liver transplants
Thanks to a review paper done at the University of Alberta radiologists at the University of Alberta Hospital are now using CT imaging for living-donor liver transplantation. CT imaging allows surgeons to plan the operation more accurately, which increases the likelihood for organ graft survival in recipients and reduces complication rates in donors. (2008-03-18)

Children with asymptomatic brain bleeds as newborns show normal brain development at age 2
A study by UNC researchers finds that neurodevelopmental scores and gray matter volumes at age two years did not differ between children who had MRI-confirmed asymptomatic subdural hemorrhages when they were neonates, compared to children with no history of subdural hemorrhage. (2020-10-30)

Exercise does not seem to increase bone marrow edema in healthy people
A recent study published in Rheumatology finds that osteitis/bone marrow edema as measured by magnetic resonance imaging was present in healthy people. However, it did not increase significantly due to intense physical activity. (2017-12-14)

Advanced imaging technology predicts cardiovascular risk from inflammation detected in arteries
The PESA-CNIC-Santander study analyzes the role of arterial inflammation in this process, providing information that will allow early diagnosis and the development of new anti-inflammatory treatments. (2019-03-25)

Brain scans show why people get aggressive after a drink or two
Researchers have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that measure blood flow in the brain to better understand why people often become aggressive and violent after drinking alcohol. After only two drinks, the researchers noted changes in the working of the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part normally involved in tempering a person's levels of aggression. (2018-02-12)

Slow, steady waves keep brain humming
Very slow brain waves, long considered an artifact of brain scanning techniques, may be more important than anyone had realized. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that very slow waves are directly linked to state of consciousness and may be involved in coordinating activity across distant brain regions. (2018-03-29)

Cardiac MRI shows lower degrees of myocarditis in athletes recovered from COVID-19
In a letter published in the December issue of the American Heart Association's medical journal Circulation a group of researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) dispute the most recent findings of the incidence of myocarditis in athletes with a history of COVID-19. (2021-01-08)

Researchers unlocking potential for next-generation medical scanning
While still in the early stages, research reported today in the journal Science Advances has made significant steps towards a new MRI method with the potential to enable doctors to personalise life-saving medical treatments and allow real-time imaging to take place in locations such as operating theatres and GP practices. (2018-01-05)

Unprecedented accuracy in locating brain electrical activity with new device
Researchers at Aalto University in Finland have developed the world's first device designed for mapping the human brain that combines whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. MEG measures the electrical function and MRI visualizes the structure of the brain. The merging of these two technologies will produce unprecedented accuracy in locating brain electrical activity non-invasively. (2012-07-26)

MRI 'glove' provides new look at hand anatomy
A new kind of MRI component in the shape of a glove delivers the first clear images of bones, tendons and ligaments moving together. (2018-05-08)

Researchers bring high res magnetic resonance imaging to nanometer scale
A new technique that brings magnetic resonance imaging to the nanometer scale with unprecedented resolution will open the door for major advances in understanding new materials, virus particles and proteins that cause diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. (2018-02-21)

MRI analysis with machine learning predicts impairment after spinal injury, study shows
A test of machine-learning algorithms shows promise for computer-aided prognosis of acute spinal cord injury, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, D.C. (2018-04-05)

MRIs during pregnancy and outcomes for infants, children
In an analysis that included more than 1.4 million births, exposure to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the first trimester of pregnancy compared with nonexposure was not associated with increased risk of harm to the fetus or in early childhood, although gadolinium MRI at any time during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of a broad set of rheumatological, inflammatory, or skin conditions and, possibly, for stillbirth or neonatal death, according to a study appearing in the Sept. 6 issue of JAMA. (2016-09-06)

Artificial intelligence may help reduce gadolinium dose in MRI
Researchers are using artificial intelligence to reduce the dose of a contrast agent that may be left behind in the body after MRI exams, according to a new study. (2018-11-26)

Dementia can be caused by hypertension
A new study in Cardiovascular Research indicates that patients with high blood pressure are at a higher risk of developing dementia. This research also shows (for the first time) that an MRI can be used to detect very early signatures of neurological damage in people with high blood pressure, before any symptoms of dementia occur. (2018-06-13)

How dopamine drives brain activity
Using a specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensor that can track dopamine levels, MIT neuroscientists have discovered how dopamine released deep within the brain influences distant brain regions. (2020-04-01)

Imaging plays key role in evaluating injuries at Olympics
The Olympic Games give elite athletes a chance at athletic triumph, but also carry a risk of injury. When injuries occur, it is critical that they be evaluated quickly. Onsite imaging services play an important role in the management of Olympic athletes with sports-related injuries and disorders, according to a new study. (2018-02-26)

Brain scans may help diagnose neurological, psychiatric disorders
A new study shows that individual brain networks are remarkably stable from day to day and while undertaking different tasks, suggesting that they could potentially form the basis of diagnostic tests for brain disorders or diseases. (2018-04-18)

For women with genetic risk, bi-annual MRI beats mammograms
Intensive surveillance including a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) exam every six months was far more effective in detecting breast cancer in younger women with a high-risk genetic profile than an annual mammogram. DCE-MRI every six months performed well for early detection of invasive breast cancer in high-risk women. (2017-12-08)

Community practices not following guidelines for MRI breast cancer screening
Guidelines are not being followed to ensure that breast cancer screening of high risk women, such as those with a strong family history of breast cancer, includes an additional MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan. Deirdre A. Hill of the University of New Mexico School of Medicine led a study on this in the Journal of General Internal Medicine which is published by Springer. (2017-12-07)

Study finds ADHD affects motor skills of boys more than girls
New research published in Neurology found that ADHD affects the motor skills of boys more than girls. By examining age-related improvement of motor skills in children with and without ADHD, researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Md., found that girls with ADHD and their typically developing peers were more likely to be able to control their movements compared to boys with ADHD. (2008-11-04)

New study finds healthy children of Alzheimer patients show early brain changes
Medical College of Wisconsin researchers in Milwaukee have reported that children of Alzheimer's patients who are carriers of a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease have neurological changes that are detectable long before clinical symptoms may appear. (2008-07-29)

Harvard researchers publish MRI images of genes in action in the living brain
Biologists have just confirmed what poets have known for centuries: eyes really are windows of the soul -- or at least of the brain. In a new study published in the April 2008 print issue of the FASEB Journal, Harvard researchers describe the development of gene probe eye drops that -- for the first time -- make it possible to monitor and detect tissue repair in the brain of living organisms using MRI. (2008-03-31)

Worried about holiday weight gain? your scale isn't giving you the whole picture
'Weighing patients or using blood tests to detect changes, hasn't, until now, given us accurate pictures, literally, of how different fat deposits are impacted disproportionately by diet and exercise,' says Prof. Iris Shai, the primary investigator of the CENTRAL MRI trial. 'These findings suggest that moderate exercise combined with a Mediterranean/low carb diet may help reduce the amount of some fat deposits even if you don't lose significant weight as part of the effort.' (2017-11-27)

Brain's appetite regulator disrupted in obese teens
Researchers using advanced MRI to study obese adolescents found disrupted connectivity in the complex regions of the brain involved in regulating appetite, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. (2017-11-30)

Better contrast agents based on nanoparticles
Scientists at the University of Basel have developed nanoparticles which can serve as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. This new type of nanoparticles produce around ten times more contrast than the actual contrast agents and are responsive to specific environments. The journal Chemical Communications has published these results. (2016-08-03)

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