Marine Mammals Current Events

Marine Mammals Current Events, Marine Mammals News Articles.
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Loss of a gene long ago puts marine mammals at risk today, as environments change
Ancient loss of gene function across ancestral marine mammal lineages may now be putting modern marine mammals at risk, leaving them defenseless against toxic organophosphates. (2018-08-09)

NOAA, partners: Testing detects algal toxins in Alaska marine mammals
Toxins from harmful algae are present in Alaskan marine food webs in high enough concentrations to be detected in marine mammals such as whales, walruses, sea lions, seals, porpoises and sea otters, according to new research from NOAA and its federal, state, local and academic partners. (2016-02-11)

Effects of anthropogenic sound on marine mammals -- a research strategy
The Marine Board-ESF published its 13th Position Paper, which presents a view from marine mammal specialists on the research needed to assess the effects of anthropogenic sound upon marine mammals. (2008-09-30)

Yale researchers find environmental toxins disruptive to hearing in mammals
Yale School of Medicine researchers have new data showing chloride ions are critical to hearing in mammals, which builds on previous research showing a chemical used to keep barnacles off boats might disrupt the balance of these ions in ear cells. (2006-04-11)

Chemical used in marine paint may damage hearing in whales
A toxic chemical painted on the bottom of large vessels to protect against barnacles may cause hearing difficulties in whales and other mammals. (2005-01-27)

Size matters: Large Marine Protected Areas work for dolphins
Ecologists in New Zealand have shown for the first time that Marine Protected Areas - long advocated as a way of protecting threatened marine mammals - actually work. Their study, based on 21 years' monitoring and published today in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology, reveals that a marine sanctuary off the coast of Christchurch has significantly improved survival of Hector's dolphins - one of the rarest dolphins in the world. (2012-03-26)

Just what the vet ordered
Recently, the Office of Naval Research provided funding to identify major infectious threats to wild and semi- domesticated dolphins and sea lions, to construct new plasmid vaccines that might stem epidemic disease, and to develop ways of measuring immune responses to these new vaccines. (2001-06-26)

Marine mammals' adaptations to low oxygen offer new perspective on COVID-19
When Terrie Williams began hearing about the wide range of symptoms experienced by patients with COVID-19, she saw a connection between the various ways the disease is affecting people and the many physiological adaptations that have enabled marine mammals to tolerate low oxygen levels during dives. In a new review article, Williams explores how the diving physiology of marine mammals can help us understand the effects of COVID-19. (2020-12-03)

Unravelling the mystery of the kitty litter parasite in marine mammals
Researchers at California Polytechnic State University have discovered what may be a clue to the mystery of why marine mammals around the world are succumbing to a parasite that is typically only associated with cats. The key may just be the lowly anchovy, according to research presented today at the 108th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. (2008-06-02)

NOAA awards $2.75 million for marine mammal rescue efforts
Today, NOAA Fisheries announced the award of $2.75 million in grant funding to partner organizations in 16 states to respond to and rehabilitate stranded marine mammals and collect data on their health. The John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant Program provides funding to non-profit and for-profit organizations, academic institutions, and state agencies that are members of the National Marine Mammal Stranding Network. (2015-09-10)

In polar regions, warm-blooded marine predators rule
Even though diversity typically decreases from the tropics to the poles, in the frigid waters of the high latitudes, warm-blooded marine mammals and birds thrive, both in number and species richness. (2019-01-24)

NOAA researcher says Arctic marine mammals are ecosystem sentinels
As the Arctic continues to see dramatic declines in seasonal sea ice, warming temperatures and increased storminess, the responses of marine mammals can provide clues to how the ecosystem is responding to these physical drivers. (2014-02-13)

Strange marine mammals of ancient North Pacific revealed
The pre-Ice Age marine mammal community of the North Pacific formed a strangely eclectic scene, research by a Geology Ph.D. student reveals. Studying hundreds of fossil bones and teeth he excavated from the San Francisco Bay Area's Purisima Formation, Robert Boessenecker has put together a record of 21 marine mammal species including dwarf baleen whales, odd double-tusked walruses, porpoises with severe underbites and a dolphin closely related to the now-extinct Chinese river dolphin. (2014-02-04)

Whales hear us more than we realize
Killer whales and other marine mammals likely hear sonar signals more than we've known. That's because commercially available sonar systems, which are designed to create signals beyond the range of hearing of such animals, also emit signals known to be within their hearing range, scientists have discovered. (2014-05-01)

Marine mammals and sea turtles recovering after Endangered Species Act protection
More than three-quarters of marine mammal and sea turtle populations have significantly increased after listing of the US Endangered Species Act (ESA), according to a study published Jan. 16 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Abel Valdivia of the Center for Biological Diversity in California, and colleagues. (2019-01-16)

Plastic in Britain's seals, dolphins and whales
Microplastics have been found in the guts of every marine mammal examined in a new study of animals washed up on Britain's shores. (2019-01-31)

The Marine Mammal Center begins new leptospirosis study in California
The Marine Mammal Center has seen an increase in leptospirosis cases in sea lions this year. Researchers there are launching a new study to determine causes of cyclical outbreaks and how the disease is spread among sea lions. (2008-10-22)

Study examines how diving marine mammals manage decompression
How do marine mammals, whose very survival depends on regular diving, manage to avoid decompression sickness or (2011-12-21)

Are drones disturbing marine mammals?
Marine researchers have made sure that their research drones aren't disturbing their research subjects, shows a report in Frontiers in Marine Science. And they're hoping that others will follow their example to help protect wildlife in the future. (2017-02-13)

Dolphins could be ideal model to study human cervical cancer, UF veterinarians say
Dolphins are the only species besides humans known to harbor infections of multiple papillomavirus types, which are known to be linked with cervical cancer in women. As a result, dolphins may be the ideal model for the study of cervical cancer in women. (2010-02-18)

Monk seal and hump-backed dolphin are threatened by fishing activities off coast of Mauritania
Catalan researchers have studied the marine trophic network in Mauritania, on the northwest coast of Africa, which is an extremely heavily exploited fishing area, as well as being home to two of the world's most threatened species of marine mammal -- the monk seal and the Atlantic hump-backed dolphin. The results of the study show that industrial and traditional fishing activities along the coast are putting these mammals and local marine ecosystems at great danger. (2011-01-21)

Smithsonian scientists discover that multiple species of seacows once coexisted
Sirenians, or seacows, are a group of marine mammals that include manatees and dugongs; Today, only one species of seacow is found in each world region. Smithsonian scientists have discovered that this was not always the case. According to the fossil record of these marine mammals, which dates back 50 million years ago, it was more common to find three, or possibly more, different species of seacows living together at one time. (2012-03-08)

New US law poised to improve marine conservation worldwide
New restrictions on US seafood imports, which will require seafood to be harvested in accordance with the US Marine Mammal Protection Act, will likely offer significant marine conservation benefits on a global scale. In this Policy Forum, Rob Williams et al. highlight the impacts and challenges involved in this endeavor. (2016-12-15)

Eating right key to survival of whales and dolphins: UBC research
In the marine world, high-energy prey make for high-energy predators. And to survive, such marine predators need to sustain the right kind of high-energy diet. Not just any prey will do, suggests a new study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of La Rochelle, in France. (2012-11-21)

The call of the sea: Mammalian evolutionary transitions back to the sea
Though mammals adapted on land, a new study by Maria Chikina and Nathan Clark has shown that during three major independent evolutionary events, a number of mammals hearkened back to the sea. (2016-06-22)

NASA contributes to first global review of Arctic marine mammals
A recently published multinational study attempted to gauge the population trends of Arctic marine mammals and changes in their habitat, identify missing scientific information, and provide recommendations for the conservation of Arctic marine mammals over the next decades. (2015-04-30)

Oxygen increase caused mammals to triumph, researchers say
The first, high resolution continuous record of oxygen concentration in the earth's atmosphere shows that a sharp rise in oxygen about 50 million years ago gave mammals the evolutionary boost they needed to dominate the planet, according to Paul Falkowski, Rutgers professor of marine science and lead author of a paper published Sept. 30 in the journal Science. (2005-09-29)

Scientists listen to whales, walruses, & seals in a changing arctic seascape
A year-round acoustic study of marine mammals in the northern Bering Sea is providing scientists with a valuable snapshot of an Arctic world already under drastic pressure from climate change, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Columbia University, Southall Environmental Associates, and the University of Washington. (2020-02-03)

How do marine mammals avoid the bends?
Deep-diving whales and other marine mammals can get the bends -- the same painful and potentially life-threatening decompression sickness that strikes scuba divers who surface too quickly. A new study offers a hypothesis of how marine mammals generally avoid getting the bends and how they can succumb under stressful conditions. (2018-04-25)

Iconic marine mammals are 'swimming in sick seas' of terrestrial pathogens: UBC researchers
Parasites and pathogens infecting humans, pets and farm animals are increasingly being detected in marine mammals such as sea otters, porpoises, harbor seals and killer whales along the Pacific coast of the US and Canada, and better surveillance is required to monitor public health implications, according to a panel of scientific experts from Canada and the United States. (2012-02-18)

SU biologist develops method for monitoring shipping noise in dolphin habitat
A biologist in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences has developed a system of techniques for tracking ships and monitoring underwater noise levels in a protected marine mammal habitat. The techniques are the subject of a groundbreaking article in Marine Pollution Bulletin, focusing on the bottlenose dolphin population in Scotland's Moray Firth. (2013-12-02)

Marine pathogens spread much faster than their terrestrial counterparts
It has become increasingly clear that pathogen epidemics are as significant a component of marine systems as they are in terrestrial systems. At an NCEAS working group on Diseases in the Ocean, McCallum et al collated data on epidemic spread from both environments. Their analysis in Ecology Letters, December, shows marine epidemics spread about 100 times faster than comparable terrestrial epidemics, warning that emerging diseases may pose particularly severe threats to marine ecosystems. (2003-11-24)

Researchers develop simulation to better understand the effects of sound on marine life
A combination of the biology of marine mammals, mechanical vibrations and acoustics has led to a breakthrough discovery allowing scientists to better understand the potential harmful effects of sound on marine mammals such as whales and dolphins. (2010-08-31)

Arctic marine mammals on thin ice
The loss of sea ice due to climate change could spell disaster for polar bears and other Arctic marine mammals. The April Special Issue of Ecological Applications examines such potential effects, puts them in historical context, and describes possible conservation measures to mitigate them. The assessment reflects the latest thinking of experts representing multiple scientific disciplines. (2008-04-23)

Preserving 4 percent of the ocean could protect most marine mammal species, study finds
Preserving just 4 percent of the ocean could protect crucial habitat for the vast majority of marine mammal species, from sea otters to blue whales, according to researchers at Stanford University and the National Autonomous University of Mexico. (2011-08-26)

Stranded dolphins exhibit bubbles, and ability to recover
In a study published online in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, a team that includes researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has confirmed that bubbles do form in live, stranded dolphins. But in many cases, those animals are able to (2011-10-19)

Rapid Arctic warming drives shifts in marine mammals, new research shows
New hydrophone surveys of migration gateways to the Arctic show that recent extremes in sea ice loss has opened new waters to humpback and fin whales that once ranged through the far north only in summer. And as climate change drives the ice into further retreat, such 'summer' species may begin competing with bowhead whales that once had the habitat to themselves, according to research presented at a major marine mammal conference this week. (2015-12-14)

Melting arctic sea ice linked to emergence of deadly virus in marine mammals
Scientists have linked the decline in Arctic sea ice to the emergence of a deadly virus that could threaten marine mammals in the North Pacific, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (2019-11-07)

Voice control: Why North Atlantic right whales change calls as they age
Through extensive listening and analysis of whale calls--which were recorded by a large collaboration of scientists over the past two decades-- Syracuse University researchers were able to pick up the slow gradual changes in sound production in the marine giants as they age. Looking at spectrograms of the calls, which provide visual representations of the sound, the research team could see the progression of vocal characteristics of the animals from calf throughout adulthood. (2018-02-26)

Dwarf whale survived well into Ice Age
Research from New Zealand's University of Otago detailing the fossil of a dwarf baleen whale from Northern California reveals that it avoided extinction far longer than previously thought. (2013-04-04)

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