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Mitochondria Current Events

Mitochondria Current Events, Mitochondria News Articles.
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Why fathers don't pass on mitochondria to offspring
Offering insights into a long-standing and mysterious bias in biology, a new study reveals how and why mitochondria are only passed on through a mother's egg -- and not the father's sperm. (2016-06-23)
Researchers discover key link between mitochondria and cocaine addiction
Scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine identified significant mitochondrial changes that take place in cocaine addiction, and they have been able to block them. (2017-12-20)
Getting old? Slowing down? Blame inefficient mitochondria
Mitochondria are the cell's equivalent of power stations. A power station burns fuel to build up steam pressure and uses that pressure to drive a turbine linked to a dynamo. (2005-12-02)
Cellular organelle evolved repeatedly
NWO researchers have discovered that in the course of evolution hydrogenosomes repeatedly evolved from mitochondria. (2001-07-26)
Mitochondria shown to trigger cell aging
Scientists have carried out an experiment which conclusively proves for the first time that mitochondria are major triggers of cell aging. (2016-02-04)
How mitochondria cope with too much work
Researchers have uncovered a mechanism by which mitochondria, essential organelles within cells that create energy, cope with an overload of imported proteins. (2018-04-12)
New Univeristy of Virginia study upends current theories of how mitochondria began
Parasitic bacteria were the first cousins of the mitochondria that power cells in animals and plants -- and first acted as energy parasites in cells before becoming beneficial, according to a new University of Virginia study. (2014-10-16)
Berlin Targeting Mitochondria 2013 reached record participants
The Chairmen of Targeting Mitochondria 2013 commented, (2013-10-09)
Yale scientists discover new technique for studying living cells, furthering knowledge of diseases like Parkinson's
Yale researchers have developed a new method for recording the electrical activities within living cells, which could lead to better treatment for diseases like Parkinson's, and provide clues to how learning occurs. (1999-11-10)
Researchers find ways to impede progress of neurodegenerative diseases
As the paper posits, there is currently no doubt that hyperpolarization of mitochondria and concomitant oxidative stress are associated with the development of serious pathologies, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, autoimmune syndromes, some cancers, and other conditions. (2018-03-30)
New research on the muscles of elite athletes: When quality is better than quantity
A Danish-Swedish research team working on a project led by University of Southern Denmark has discovered that muscle endurance is not only determined by the number of mitochondria, but also their structure. (2016-11-02)
Breakthrough in understanding mitochondria
Scientists have made a breakthrough in understanding how mitochondria -- the 'powerhouses' of human cells -- are made. (2017-08-30)
Cell disposal faults could contribute to Parkinson's, study finds
A fault with the natural waste disposal system that helps to keep our brain cell 'batteries' healthy may contribute to neurodegenerative disease, a new study has found. (2017-01-24)
Antioxidants developed by MSU scientists slow down senescence in plants
A team from the Faculty of Biology, MSU tested on plants mitochondria-targeted antioxidants developed in the university lab under the guidance of Academician Vladimir Skulachev. (2018-06-08)
Digging deep into distinctly different DNA
A University of Queensland discovery has deepened our understanding of the genetic mutations that arise in different tissues, and how these are inherited. (2018-01-22)
A cause of possible genetic problems in mitochondria is revealed
The loss of mitochondrial information and of mitochondria gives rise to defective cell metabolism. (2019-01-03)
Stem cells age-discriminate organelles to maintain stemness
A study suggests that asymmetric apportioning of old cellular components during cell division may represent an anti-aging mechanism by stem cells. (2015-04-02)
Lighting up the heart
For the first time ever, researchers at the University of Bristol have been able to directly measure energy levels inside living heart cells, in real time, using the chemical that causes fireflies to light up. (2006-09-21)
Songbirds may have 'borrowed' DNA to fuel migration
A common songbird may have acquired genes from fellow migrating birds in order to travel greater distances, according to a University of British Columbia study published this week in the journal Evolution. (2013-09-19)
An early step in Parkinson's disease: Problems with mitochondria
For the last several years, neurologists have been probing a connection between Parkinson's disease and problems with mitochondria, the miniature power plants of the cell. (2011-02-14)
Key cellular mechanism in the body's 'battery' can either spur or stop obesity
Becoming obese or remaining lean can depend on the dynamics of the mitochondria, the body's energy-producing (2013-09-26)
Gene defect may point to solution for Alzheimer's
University of Bergen researchers have found a protein that could hold the key to understanding how Alzheimer's disease develops. (2016-04-13)
Key cell-death step found
A fundamental cellular event related to programmed cell death has been decoded by cell biologists at UC Davis and Johns Hopkins University. (2004-09-21)
It's in our genes: Why women outlive men
Scientists are beginning to understand one of life's enduring mysteries - why women live, on average, longer than men. (2012-08-02)
Pitt Neuroscientists Uncover Mechanism For Neuron Death, Counter Long-Held Assumptions About This Process
Calcium flow into mitochondria triggers the death of neurons exposed to glutamate, which proves toxic when overproduced in brain injury and stroke. (1998-09-04)
On the origin of Eukaryotes -- when cells got complex
Just as physicists comprehend the origin of the universe by observing the stars and archeologists reconstruct ancient civilizations with the artifacts found today, evolutionary biologists study the diversity of modern-day species to understand the origin of life and evolution. (2016-02-03)
Researchers redefine the origin of the cellular powerhouse
In a new study published by Nature, an international team of researchers led by Uppsala University in Sweden proposes a new evolutionary origin for mitochondria -- also known as the 'powerhouses of the cell.' Mitochondria are energy-converting organelles that have played key roles in the emergence of complex cellular life on Earth. (2018-04-25)
New insights into the cause of neurological symptoms in mitochondrial diseases
In a paper published on March 31 in Cell Reports, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital shed light on what may be the root cause of neurological symptoms in patients with mitochondrial diseases by tracing the development of interneurons. (2016-03-31)
Mitochondrial lipids as potential targets in early onset Parkinson's disease
A team of researchers led by Patrik Verstreken have identified an underlying mechanism in early onset Parkinson's. (2017-02-10)
New platinum compound shows promise in tumor cells
MIT chemists have developed a new platinum compound that is as powerful as the commonly used anticancer drug cisplatin but better able to destroy tumor cells. (2009-12-07)
Vitamin K2: New hope for Parkinson's patients?
Neuroscientist Patrik Verstreken, associated with VIB and KU Leuven, succeeded in undoing the effect of one of the genetic defects that leads to Parkinson's using vitamin K2. (2012-05-11)
Malignant mitochondria as a target
Killing malignant mitochondria is one of the most promising approaches in the development of new anticancer drugs. (2017-12-13)
Feet first? Old mitochondria might be responsible for neuropathy in the extremities
The burning, tingling pain of neuropathy may affect feet and hands before other body parts because the powerhouses of nerve cells that supply the extremities age and become dysfunctional as they complete the long journey to these areas, Johns Hopkins scientists suggest in a new study. (2011-03-03)
Defective cellular waste removal explains why Gaucher patients often develop Parkinson's disease
Gaucher disease causes debilitating and sometimes fatal neurodegeneration in early childhood. (2013-05-23)
New insight in how cells' powerhouse divides
New research from UC Davis and the University of Colorado at Boulder puts an unexpected twist on how mitochondria, the energy-generating structures within cells, divide. (2011-09-02)
Extracting cellular 'engines' may aid in understanding mitochondrial diseases
Medical researchers who crave a means of exploring the genetic culprits behind a host of neuromuscular disorders may have just had their wish granted by a NIST team that has performed surgery on single cells to extract and examine their mitochondria. (2011-01-06)
How cytoplasmic DNA undergoes adaptation to avoid harmful mutations
University of Sydney School of Life and Environmental Sciences researchers Joshua Christie and Madeleine Beekman have used computational tools to better understand cytoplasmic DNA adaptation and how they promote beneficial mutations -- and more importantly, avoid harmful mutations which could become like Trojan horses to affect the whole cell, and thereby, the health of an organism. (2016-12-13)
Mutations that cause Parkinson's disease prevent cells from destroying defective mitochondria
Mutations that cause Parkinson's disease prevent cells from destroying defective mitochondria, according to a study published online May 10 in the Journal of Cell Biology. (2010-05-10)
Researchers discover mitochondria-to-nucleus messenger protein
Researchers have identified a protein, G-Protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2), that moves from a cell's mitochondria to its nucleus in response to stress and during the differentiation of fat cells. (2018-03-01)
Getting closer to treatment for Parkinson's
More than 10 million people worldwide have Parkinson´s disease. A groundbreaking study from the University of Bergen, may answer why some develop the disease while others do not. (2017-01-23)
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