Nanoparticles Current Events

Nanoparticles Current Events, Nanoparticles News Articles.
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Research examines how to optimize nanoparticles for efficient drug delivery
Nanoparticles are being studied as drug delivery systems to treat a wide variety of diseases. New research delves into the physical properties of nanoparticles that are important for successfully delivering therapeutics within the body, with a primary focus on size. This is especially important as relatively subtle differences in size can affect cell uptake and determine the fate of nanoparticles once within cells. (2016-07-18)

Tiny particles may pose threat to liver cells, say scientists
Researchers at the University of Edinburgh are to study the effects of nanoparticles on the liver. In a UK first, the scientists will assess whether nanoparticles -already found in pollution from traffic exhaust, but also used in making household goods such as paint, sunblock, food, cosmetics and clothes- can cause damage to the cells of the liver. (2006-04-04)

Chemicals' study pinpoints threat to workers' lungs
Tiny particles used in a range of everyday products from computers to shampoo can adversely affect the lungs in very different ways, a study has shown. Research by the University of Edinburgh suggests that industrial manufacturers using nanoparticles should be aware of the risks that different types of nanoparticles pose to workers who handle them. (2010-11-17)

Zinc oxide nanoparticles: Therapeutic benefits and toxicological hazards
Despite the widespread application of zinc oxide nanoparticles in biomedicine, their use is still a controversial issue. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were are reported to have therapeutic benefits. (2018-10-17)

Through the kidneys to the exit
Scientists at the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' (NUST MISIS) have identified a new mechanism for removing magnetic nanoparticles through the kidneys, which will help to create more effective and safe drugs. The results of the study are published in the Journal of Controlled Release. (2019-08-13)

Engineers produce 'how-to' guide for controlling the structure of nanoparticles
Researchers from North Carolina State University have learned how to consistently create hollow, solid and amorphous nanoparticles of nickel phosphide, which has potential uses in the development of solar cells and as catalysts for removing sulfur from fuel. Their work can now serve as a (2009-09-24)

Nanoparticles could allow for faster, better medicine
Gold nanoparticles could help make drugs act more quickly and effectively, according to new research conducted at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2017-11-20)

Nanoparticles cause brain injury in fish
Scientists at the University of Plymouth have shown, for the first time in an animal, that nanoparticles have a detrimental effect on the brain and other parts of the central nervous system. (2011-09-18)

Silver nanoparticle concentration too low to be harmful in water supply, paper finds
Silver nanoparticles have a wide array of uses, one of which is to treat drinking water for harmful bacteria and viruses. But do silver nanoparticles also kill off potentially beneficial bacteria or cause other harmful effects to water-based ecosystems? A new paper from a team of University of Missouri College of Engineering researchers says that's not the case. (2016-10-13)

Gold and silver nano baubles
They might just be the smallest Christmas tree decorations ever. Tiny spherical particles of gold and silver that are more than 100 million times smaller than the gold and silver baubles used to decorate seasonal fir trees have been synthesized by researchers in Mexico and the US. (2010-12-03)

Wash your mouth out with silver
Yeasts which cause hard-to-treat mouth infections are killed using silver nanoparticles in the laboratory, scientists have found. These yeast infections, caused by Candida albicans and Candida glabrata target the young, old and immuno-compromised. Professor Mariana Henriques, University of Minho, and her colleagues hope to test silver nanoparticles in mouthwash and dentures as a potential preventative measure against these infections. (2012-03-07)

How to count nanoparticles
Nanoparticles of a substance can be counted and the size distribution can be determined by dispersing the nanoparticles into a gas. But some nanoparticles tend to aggregate when the surrounding conditions change. Scientists at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have shown that it is possible to sort and count the particles, even when they have formed aggregates. (2011-10-10)

UMBC researchers develop nanoparticles to reduce internal bleeding caused by blast trauma
Currently, there are no treatments available to address internal bleeding in the field but early intervention is key or survival and better outcomes. UMBC researchers and collaborators investigated the role of nanoparticles they developed to stop internal bleeding on the damage inflicted by blast trauma. (2018-07-13)

New 'triggered-release' mechanism could improve drug delivery
More efficient medical treatments could be developed thanks to a new method for triggering the rearrangement of chemical particles. The new method, developed at the University of Warwick, uses two 'parent' nanoparticles that are designed to interact only when in proximity to each other and trigger the release of drug molecules contained within both. (2015-01-16)

Gold nanoparticles more stable by putting rings on them
Hokkaido University scientists have found a way to prevent gold nanoparticles from clumping, which could help towards their use as an anti-cancer therapy. (2021-01-21)

Safety of nanoparticles in food crops is still unclear
With the curtain about to rise on a much-anticipated new era of (2011-06-01)

Gold nanoparticles enrich everyday products
A new technique for dispersing nanoparticles through polymers opens a world of new properties for diverse products. (2010-05-04)

Toxic nanoparticles might be entering human food supply
Farmers have used silver nanoparticles as a pesticide because of their capability to suppress the growth of harmful organisms. However, a growing concern is that these particles could pose a potential health risk to humans and the environment. In a new study, researchers at the University of Missouri have developed a reliable method for detecting silver nanoparticles in fresh produce and other food products. (2013-08-22)

Sweet nanoparticles trick kidney
Researchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy. (2020-02-04)

Researchers discover new way to design metal nanoparticle catalysts
Researchers at Northwestern University have discovered a new strategy for fabricating metal nanoparticles in catalysts that promises to enhance the selectivity and yield for a wide range of structure-sensitive catalytic reactions. (2011-02-22)

Anti-clumping strategy for nanoparticles
Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in industrial applications ranging from drug delivery and biomedical diagnostics to developing hydrophobic surfaces, lubricant additives and enhanced oil recovery solutions in petroleum fields. For such nanoparticles to be effective, they need to remain well dispersed into the fluid surrounding them. In a study published in EPJ B, Brazilian physicists identified the conditions that lead to instability of nanoparticles and producing aggregates. (2015-10-16)

Too much technology may be killing beneficial bacteria
For years, scientists have known about silver's ability to kill harmful bacteria. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found that silver nanoparticles also may destroy benign bacteria that are used to remove ammonia from wastewater treatment systems. The study was funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. (2008-04-29)

Possible reason for carcinogenicity of silica dust found
MIPT's scientists partnered with their colleagues from Skoltech in a study that suggests a possible explanation of the toxicity and carcinogenicity , or the 'cancer-causing' properties of silica dust (silicon oxide particles). It turned out that nature defies the predictions of classical chemistry by forming unexpected products of oxidation processes involving silicon nanoparticles. The scientists have shown that silica nanoparticles contain reactive oxygen species that have long been suggested as a possible cause of lung cancer. (2016-11-10)

MU researchers examine the environmental effects of silver nanoparticles
Realize it or not, it's a nano world. Many everyday consumer items now utilize the emerging science of nanotechnology, and so, researchers at the University of Missouri-Columbia will examine whether the technology poses future problems for the environment. (2007-05-09)

New bimetallic alloy nanoparticles for printed electronic circuits
A Toyohashi Tech researcher, in cooperation with researchers at Duke University, has invented a production method for oxidation-resistant copper alloy nanoparticles for printed electronics. These novel nanoparticles were produced by an environmentally friendly and economical 'wire explosion' method. This invention will expand the application range of printed electronics. (2016-01-05)

Plants open their pores and scientists strike gold
Plants containing the element gold are already widely known. The flowering perennial plant alfafa, for example, has been cultivated by scientists to contain pure gold in its plant tissue. Now researchers from the Sun Yat-sen University in China have identified and investigated the characteristics of gold nanoparticles in two plant species growing in their natural environments. (2018-06-14)

A new 'Pyrex' nanoparticle
Researchers in Switzerland have developed a new method to fabricate borosilicate glass nanoparticles. Used in microfluidic systems, these (2008-09-07)

Study improves understanding of method for creating multi-metal nanoparticles
A new study from researchers at North Carolina State University sheds light on how a technique that is commonly used for making single-metal nanoparticles can be extended to create nanoparticles consisting of two metals -- and that have tunable properties. The study also provides insight into the optical properties of some of these nanoparticles. (2010-12-15)

Antibacterial silver nanoparticles are a blast
Writing in the International Journal of Nanoparticles, Rani Pattabi and colleagues at Mangalore University, explain how blasting silver nitrate solution with an electron beam can generate nanoparticles that are more effective at killing all kinds of bacteria, including gram-negative species that are not harmed by conventional antibacterial agents. (2010-05-24)

Common nanoparticles found to be highly toxic to Arctic ecosystem
Queen's researchers have discovered that nanoparticles, which are now present in everything from socks to salad dressing and suntan lotion, may have irreparably damaging effects on soil systems and the environment. (2011-04-06)

From pomegranate peel to nanoparticles
Food waste is a growing problem in many parts of the world, but discarded fruit peel, in the case of pomegranates, could be put to good use in the burgeoning field of nanotechnology according to research published in the International Journal of Nanoparticles. (2012-06-19)

Nanoparticles for biosensors
Fluorescent nanoparticles that can be attached to biological molecules are being developed for use in microscopic sensor devices. (2004-03-28)

Inverting a standard experiment sometimes produces different results
The standard experimental setup for measuring the cellular uptake of nanoparticles is to place cells in a well on a culture plate and cover them with culture medium containing nanoparticles. The assumption underlying these experiments is that the particles remain well-dispersed. But when a Washington University scientist turned cell cultures upside down, he discovered that this assumption doesn't always hold. Some experiments preparing for the clinical use of nanoparticles may therefore need to be redone. (2011-04-28)

Professor calls for a new branch of learning
Nanotechnology, the 'science of small things' is set to bring huge advantages in engineering, electronics, medicine and IT-- but the potential threats to health that widespread use of nanoparticles could bring need to be scrutinised, says a University of Edinburgh expert in this month's edition of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (2004-08-30)

Making nanodots useful for chemistry
Nanosized clusters of germanium that can be reacted chemically to make useful materials, such as plastics, have been made by chemists at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and UC Davis. (2003-06-18)

Nanoparticles used in solar energy conversion
The problem with solar energy is that it has not been inexpensive enough in the past. David Kelley, professor of chemistry at Kansas State University, developed a new type of nanoparticle -- a tiny chemical compound far too small to be seen with the naked eye -- that may reap big dividends in solar power. Kelley's team is studying the properties and technical problems of gallium selenide nanoparticles. (2002-08-08)

A 'nano-golf course' to assemble precisely nanoparticules
EPFL researchers have developed a method to place and position hundreds of thousands of nanoparticles very precisely on a one centimeter square surface. This will open new doors in nanotechnologies. (2016-10-03)

Strategy tested in mice protects against SARS-CoV-2 & coronaviruses that represent human threats
An immunization strategy tested in mice protects against infection from SARS-CoV-2, as well as from potentially emerging animal coronaviruses, researchers say. (2021-01-12)

Research reveals liquid gold on the nanoscale
Swansea University researchers have discovered what liquid gold looks like on the nanoscale - and in doing so have mapped the way in which nanoparticles melt, which is relevant to the manufacturing and performance of nanotech devices such as bio-sensors, nanochips , gas sensors, and catalysts. (2019-06-13)

Research creates nanoparticles perfectly formed to tackle cancer
Researchers from the University of Hull have discovered a way to load up nanoparticles with large numbers of light-sensitive molecules to create a more effective form of photodynamic therapy for treating cancer. (2011-06-06)

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