Newborns Current Events

Newborns Current Events, Newborns News Articles.
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Limit sucrose as painkiller for newborns
Using sucrose to reduce pain in newborns undergoing painful procedures should be limited to babies having blood taken for the newborn screening test but not for intramuscular injections. (2008-06-30)

Study reveals large differences in drug prescriptions for newborns between NICUs
Little is known concerning how extensively drugs are prescribed to newborns in different neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). (2018-04-23)

Does opioid maintenance treatment during pregnancy harm newborns?
A new Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study found no harm to newborns from opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) during pregnancy compared with no treatment. (2019-08-15)

Making medications safer for newborns
Although new drugs must be shown to be both safe and effective for approval by the Food and Drug Administration, sick newborns receive most of their drug treatment off-label and without the evidence provided for adults and older children. A new editorial looks at the challenges of performing clinical trials in newborns, from the reluctance of parents to enroll their infants to the lack of experience of pediatricians and neonatologists in conducting clinical research. (2016-10-04)

Researchers work on vaccine to improve immune system in newborns
As soon as babies are born, they are susceptible to diseases and infections, such as jaundice and E. coli. For up to a month, their immune systems aren't adequately developed to fight diseases. Although these infections are often minor, they can lead to serious problems if left untreated. To help strengthen newborns' immune systems, University of Missouri researchers have pinpointed a group of depleted white blood cells, which might lead to an immune-strengthening vaccine. (2009-12-15)

Can good blood sugar control during labor benefit offspring of diabetic mothers?
Hypoglycaemia, or low blood sugar, is a common and potentially serious outcome in newborns whose mothers were diabetic during pregnancy. Clinicians have wondered whether good blood sugar control during labour might reduce the risk that newborns will have hypoglycaemia. (2018-01-08)

Manual breast milk expression better than breast pump for poor feeders
Expressing breast milk by hand in the first days after birth is better for boosting breastfeeding rates among poorly feeding newborns than the use of a breast pump, indicates a small study published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2011-07-18)

1 size doesn't fit all
One size chart doesn't fit all when it comes to evaluating birth weight and health outcomes of newborns. (2013-07-31)

Early antiretroviral treatment shrinks the HIV reservoir in infected infants
Starting antiretroviral therapy within hours of birth drastically shrinks the reservoir of HIV virus -- an important step in efforts to cure infections -- and improves antiviral immune responses in newborns with HIV, shows a two-year study of a unique cohort of ten infants in Botswana. (2019-11-27)

Early discharge appears safe for Medicaid newborns
A reduction in length of stay for newborns insured by Medicaid appears to be a safe practice - if post-discharge care is well-coordinated, according to a Children's Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati study published in the September 22/29 edition of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). (1999-09-20)

How to treat Ebola during pregnancy
A pregnant woman in Africa who has contracted Ebola is likely to suffer with a spontaneous abortion, pregnancy-related hemorrhage, or the death of her newborn. Although the risk of caring for a pregnant woman with Ebola in the United States may be rare, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses has published a practice brief in its Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing to guide nursing care for pregnant women and newborns. (2014-12-15)

Continuous pain is often not assessed during neonatal intensive care
In an analysis of 243 neonatal intensive care units from 18 European countries, investigators found that only 2113 of 6648 (31.8 percent) newborns were assessed for prolonged, continuous pain. Daily assessments of continuous pain occurred in only 10.4 percent of newborns. (2017-03-06)

Exposure to secondhand smoke in the womb has lifelong impact
Newborns of nonsmoking moms exposed to secondhand smoke during pregnancy have genetic mutations that may affect long-term health, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health study published online in The Open Pediatric Medicine Journal. The abnormalities, which were indistinguishable from those found in newborns of mothers who were active smokers, may affect survival, birth weight and lifelong susceptibility to diseases like cancer. (2010-06-30)

Death rates in hospital highest for infants, and children without insurance
The vast majority of children who die while hospitalized are newborns, according to a new nationwide study. Additionally, death rates are higher for hospitalized children without insurance compared to those with insurance, the University of Michigan researchers found. (2008-12-10)

Babies' language learning starts from the womb
From their very first days, newborns' cries already bear the mark of the language their parents speak, reveals a new study published online on Nov. 5 in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. The findings suggest that infants begin picking up elements of what will be their first language in the womb, and certainly long before their first babble or coo. (2009-11-05)

Novel information about the effects of in vitro fertilization on embryonic growth
In vitro fertilization affects the regulatory region of genes essential for placental and embryonic growth, as well as the birth weight. A new study suggests that the effects depend on genetic variation inherited from the parents. This information could be useful in development of assisted reproduction technologies. (2018-06-18)

Bilingual babies: The roots of bilingualism in newborns
According to new findings, infants born to bilingual mothers (who spoke both languages regularly during pregnancy) exhibit different language preferences than infants born to mothers speaking only one language. These results suggest that bilingual infants, along with monolingual infants, are able to discriminate between the two languages, providing a mechanism from the first moments of life that helps ensure bilingual infants do not confuse their two languages. (2010-02-16)

Universal syllables
Languages are learned, it's true, but are there also innate bases in the structure of language that precede experience? Linguists have noticed that, despite the huge variability of human languages, there are some preferences in the sound of words that can be found across languages. So they wonder whether this reflects the existence of a universal, innate biological basis of language. A SISSA study provides evidence to support to this hypothesis. (2014-04-01)

Morphine and topical anesthesia found effective in treating pain in newborn infants
Intravenous morphine used alone or with topical tetracaine effectively reduced levels of pain in preterm newborn infants undergoing central line insertion procedures, according to a study in the February 15 issue of JAMA. (2006-02-14)

Study examines drug treatments for newborns exposed to opioids during pregnancy
Neonatal abstinence syndrome describes symptoms (including jitteriness, high-pitched crying, sweating and diarrhea) that primarily occur in newborns exposed to opioids during pregnancy. Finding an optimal drug therapy to treat newborns for neonatal abstinence syndrome may reduce the length of treatment and hospital stay. (2019-01-22)

More accurate diagnostic test may reduce deaths
A more accurate, faster diagnostic test for Group B Streptococcal infection in babies has been reported in the Journal of Medical Microbiology. The new test could allow better treatment and management of the disease and reduce the risk of mortality among newborns. (2012-06-26)

Maternal Exposure To Crack Cocaine Produces Stressed Newborns
New testing techniques help resolve confusion about infants born to women who smoke crack cocaine during pregnancy. Crack produces excitable, stressed infants but might not cause hemorrhages, lesions and brain damage as previously thought (1996-08-14)

Fathers' postnatal hormone levels predict later caregiving, study shows
Dads whose cortisol levels were elevated while they held their newborns on the day of their birth -- either skin-to-skin or clothed -- were more likely to be involved with indirect care and play with their infants in the first months of their lives. (2018-10-03)

Doctors' own fear of death linked to hastening death of very sick newborns
Doctors who fear their own death say they are more prepared than other doctors to hasten death in sick newborns for whom further medical treatment is considered futile, reveals research published ahead of print in the Fetal & Neonatal Edition of Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2007-02-05)

Newborn infants learn while asleep; study may lead to later disability tests
Sleeping newborns are better learners than thought, says a University of Florida researcher about a study that is the first of its type. The study could lead to identifying those at risk for developmental disorders such as autism and dyslexia. (2010-05-17)

Researchers unlock TB vaccine puzzle in findings that could save millions of newborns
An international research team has identified the mechanism behind one of science's most enduring mysteries: what makes the 100-year-old tuberculosis (TB) vaccine so effective at preventing newborn deaths from diseases other than TB? (2020-05-06)

Exposure to phthalates may be a risk factor for low birth weight in infants
Many parents worry about their child's exposure to phthalates, the chemical compounds used as plasticizers in a wide variety of personal care products, children's toys and medical devices. Phthalate exposure can begin in the womb, and has been associated with negative changes in endocrine function. A new study soon to be published in the Journal of Pediatrics examines the possibility that in utero phthalate exposure contributes to low birth weight in infants. (2009-06-25)

Newborns infected with COVID-19 in China experienced mild symptoms
Researchers have identified a total of four cases of newborn babies with COVID-19 infection in China. In all cases the babies experienced only mild symptoms with none requiring intensive care or mechanical ventilation according to research published in in the European Respiratory Journal today (Thursday). (2020-04-08)

Directly measuring function in tiny hearts
The amount of blood the heart pumps in one minute can be directly measured safely in newborns by monitoring changes in blood velocity after injecting saline, indicates the first clinical study of direct cardiac output measurement in newborns. (2020-01-08)

Immune discovery should help develop improved vaccines for infants and newborns
Specific immune danger signals are highly efficient in triggering immune responses in infants and newborns, whose immune systems function very differently to those of adults. The scientists believe their discovery could reduce both the age at which vaccines can be first administered, and the need for multiple booster shots. (2018-07-10)

Newborn babies have built-in body awareness ability
The ability to differentiate your own body from others is a fundamental skill, critical for humans' ability to interact with their environments and the people in them. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, on Nov. 21 provide some of the first evidence that newborn babies enter the world with the essential mechanisms for this kind of body awareness already in place. (2013-11-21)

Enzyme controlling cell death paves way for treatment of brain damage in newborns
Brain damage due to birth asphyxia -- where the brain is starved of oxygen around the time of delivery -- is normally treated by cooling the infant, but this only helps one baby in nine. New research from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, could now pave the way for new ways of treating brain damage in newborns. (2011-10-25)

Surgery before pregnancy linked to increased risk of opioid withdrawal in babies
Babies whose mothers underwent surgery before pregnancy had an increased risk of opioid withdrawal symptoms at birth, found a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-07-15)

Ethnicity plays a role in neonatal deaths
Researchers have uncovered ethnic differences in the risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity (disease) in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU). Of grave concern is the noted elevation in mortality rate in the NICU among infants of South Asian (East Indian) origin, which is over three times that of Caucasian infants. It was also found that Aboriginal males and East Asian females had significantly greater odds of survival. University of Alberta's Dr. Shoo Lee was a member of the research team. (2007-07-23)

Incubator electromagnetic fields alter newborns' heart rates
The electromagnetic fields produced by incubators alter newborns' heart rates, reveals a small study published ahead of print in the Fetal and Neonatal Edition of Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2008-04-30)

Metabolic disease too easily missed
Dutch researcher Terry Derks has demonstrated that the metabolic disease MCAD deficiency can be detected at an early stage. At present the disease is only found in half of the expected number of patients. With the help of a new screening method, all newborns can now be screened. (2007-02-15)

Home pregnancy tests can lead to better prenatal care
The simple intervention of providing women who are having unprotected sex with a home pregnancy test could have a substantial impact on the health of potential newborns, according to a Michigan State University study. (2009-02-10)

Best strategy for managing hypertension and preeclampsia at end of pregnancy
In 2009, the Hypertension and Preeclampsia Intervention Trial At near Term-I (HYPITAT- I) trial showed that inducing labor in women with gestational hypertension or preeclampsia at the end of pregnancy reduces the number of high risk situations for the mother, without compromising the health of newborns. An analysis published in Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology evaluated the impact of the HYPITAT-I findings on timing of labor and subsequent outcomes for mother and child in the Netherlands. (2019-09-05)

Scientists discover why newborns get sick so often
If you think cold and flu season is tough, trying being an infant. A new research finding published in the Nov. 2013 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology sheds new light on why newborns appear to be so prone to getting sick with viruses -- they are born without one of the key proteins needed to protect them. (2013-10-31)

Research helping to improve detection of disease in newborn babies
New research will help health-care practitioners to more accurately diagnose disease and illness in newborn babies from urine samples, according to a study by researchers at the University of Alberta and the Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas. (2020-07-16)

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