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Pandemic Current Events, Pandemic News Articles.
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COVID-19 pandemic led to decreased school meal access for children in need across Maryland
School closures during COVID-19 have decreased access to school meals, which is likely to increase the risk for food insecurity among children in Maryland, according to a new report issued by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). (2021-01-29)

Researchers identify key peptides that could lead to a universal vaccine for influenza
Researchers at the University of Southampton, University of Oxford and Retroscreen Virology Ltd have discovered a series of peptides, found on the internal structures of influenza viruses that could lead to the development of a universal vaccine for influenza, one that gives people immunity against all strains of the disease, including seasonal, avian, and swine flu. (2012-01-31)

New study shows increase in domestic violence injuries during COVID-19
There was a higher incidence and severity of physical intimate partner violence (IPV) among patients seen at a large, academic medical center in the US during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the prior three years, according to a new study. (2020-08-13)

Confronting Influenza: Are We Prepared?
On September 15, 2005, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) are sponsoring a symposium on the current state of research, development of prophylactic and therapeutic treatments, and U.S. and global strategies aiming to manage both annual and possible global pandemic influenza outbreaks. (2005-09-08)

COVID-19 may impact treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes
Individuals with diabetes are at increased risk for bacterial, parasitic and viral infections. New research published in Endocrine Reviews, a journal of the Endocrine Society, illuminates how intersections of the coronavirus infection (COVID-19) and type 2 diabetes may require new approaches in treatment for hospitalized patients. (2020-04-14)

Fighting the COVID-19 pandemic and major diseases at the same time
Researchers, politicians and funding bodies find themselves in front of a unique situation: The mounting pressure to accelerate and intensify efforts to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic while handling the growing threat from all other diseases endangering our society. This balancing and how well the scientific community will respond to it will define health across the globe for years to come, argue scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) in a commentary in the latest issue of the journal Cell. (2020-05-14)

Stress was leading reason teachers quit before pandemic, and COVID has made matters worse
Stress was the most common reason teachers cited for leaving the profession before and during the pandemic, according to a RAND Corporation survey of nearly 1,000 former public-school teachers. Three of four former teachers said work was often or always stressful in the most recent year in which they taught in a public school. Teachers cited stress nearly twice as often as insufficient pay as a reason for quitting. (2021-02-22)

A comparison of severe outcomes during the waves of pandemic (H1N1) 2009
The second wave of the pandemic (H1N1) was substantially greater than the first with 4.8 times more hospital admissions, 4.6 times more deaths and 4 times more ICU cases, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). However, because of the larger number of people hospitalized during the second wave compared to the first, the percentage of people with severe outcomes was smaller. (2010-11-08)

COVID-19 pandemic responsible for decrease in hepatitis C testing
New research from Boston Medical Center finds that the COVID-19 emergency systemic changes made to decrease in-person visits during the pandemic have led to a decrease in hospital-wide Hepatitis C (HCV) testing by 50 percent, and a reduction in new HCV diagnoses by more than 60 percent. (2020-12-04)

Survey: Frequent reports of missed medical care in US adults during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic
Two out of five individuals delayed or missed medical care in the early phase of the pandemic--from March through mid-July 2020. (2021-01-21)

Researchers identify key step bird flu virus takes to spread readily in humans
Since it first appeared in Hong Kong in 1997, the H5N1 avian flu virus has been slowly evolving into a pathogen better equipped to infect humans. The final form of the virus, biomedical researchers fear, will be a highly pathogenic strain of influenza that spreads easily among humans. (2007-10-04)

Pitt scientists receive $3.6M to test vaccine against deadliest strain of avian flu
Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research have been awarded $3.6 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to conduct animal studies of vaccines designed to protect against the most common and deadliest strain of avian flu, H5N1. Recent outbreaks of H5N1 have prompted health officials to warn of its continued threat to global health and potential to trigger an avian flu pandemic. (2008-08-25)

COVID-19: Lessons to learn about the first 4.0 pandemic
Although the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak was officially presented suddenly in the popular market of exotic and wild animals in Wuhan in December 2019, phylogenetic studies state that coronavirus was already present in latency phase since October in this city in the province of Hubei. During this latency phase, the infection followed its silent course and spread among the population in a stochastic way without showing epidemic signs. (2020-05-18)

From the heart: study shows impact of social media appeals from COVID-19 frontliners
Anyone who's on social media right now has probably seen them: Passionate pleas from health care workers, asking for the public to realize how bad the COVID-19 pandemic has gotten, and urging them to take steps to slow the spread of coronavirus. But do these first-person posts from the heart actually have any effect? A new study of simulated posts by emergency physicians and government officials suggests so. (2020-12-10)

GSA's journals publish three new articles on COVID-19 and Aging
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19, and all are free to access. The following were published between July 24 and August 25; all are free to access. (2020-08-26)

Long road ahead in developing effective avian flu vaccination strategy, Stanford expert says
The near inevitability that influenza will explode into a pandemic in the coming few years has kept researchers searching for a way to prevent the worst effects of infection. The ultimate prize is a highly effective vaccine that could be produced and deployed rapidly. (2007-02-16)

New procedure will reduce the need for rare metals in chemical synthesis
Researchers from Kanazawa University performed an important type of tertiary alkylative cross-coupling reaction without using a rare-metal catalyst. Such efforts are needed to improve the long-term sustainability of important chemical syntheses and minimize supply chain disruptions caused by pandemics and other crises. (2020-11-27)

Will we be able to predict the next zoonotic pandemic?
Zoonoses -- pathogenic organisms such as bacteria or viruses which we share with animals -- cause more than 60 percent of human infectious diseases, and have been responsible for some of the most devastating disease outbreaks in recent years, including HIV, Ebola, and SARS. However, despite their huge, and rising, impact on human health there are still major gaps in our understanding of how zoonoses spread and develop, which need to be urgently addressed if we to be able to reduce the impact of the next zoonotic pandemic. (2012-11-30)

Virus 'barcodes' offer rapid detection of mutated strains
Researchers at the University of Leeds are developing a way to 'barcode' viral diseases to rapidly test new outbreaks for potentially lethal mutations. (2012-05-13)

Intersecting social inequities increase the likelihood of severe illness due to COVID-19
Black, South Asian and Aboriginal populations from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds in Canada are nearly four times more likely to have three or more medical conditions that have been identified as risk factors for severe illness from COVID-19. (2020-09-24)

Majority skeptical healthcare costs will fall anytime soon as Biden begins presidency
In his inaugural address, President Biden vowed that 'help is on the way' to a nation grappling with a pandemic that has already claimed over 420,000 lives and counting. However, despite the promise of a better future, a new survey from West Health and Gallup finds Americans remain largely skeptical that issues as varied as managing the COVID-19 crisis, lowering healthcare costs, improving the economy, fixing immigration and addressing climate change, will improve anytime soon. (2021-01-28)

Research suggests combating a pandemic is 500 times more expensive than preventing one
BU biologist and peers find investing in wildlife monitoring and deforestation could prevent costly pandemics. (2020-07-28)

Quantifying effects of non-pharmaceutical interventions on SARS-CoV-2 transmission with modeling
Limiting gatherings to fewer than 10 people and closing educational institutions were among the most effective nonpharmaceutical interventions at reducing transmission of SARS-CoV-2, a new modeling study finds. (2020-12-15)

Study reveals impact of COVID-19 on oncology staff and their work
A study presented at the NCRI Virtual Showcase reports the results of a survey of oncology staff on their management of patients, their wellbeing and whether they felt valued during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-10-29)

This is what Germany's eSports athletes eat
A can of Red Bull next to the computer mouse, a bag of potato chips next to the keyboard - that's how many people imagine nutrition in eSports. ''The energy drink is indeed part of the diet for many,'' says Professor Ingo Froböse, head of the Institute of Movement Therapy and movement-oriented Prevention and Rehabilitation at the German Sport University Cologne, ''but overall, eSports players actually eat better than the general population.'' (2021-02-03)

University of Minnesota, Tufts University part of global workforce development against emerging pandemic threats
Under a new five-year award of up to $50 million, the University of Minnesota and Tufts University will be part of an international partnership of universities to strengthen global workforce development against emerging pandemic threats. Called One Health Workforce, the work is part of a new United States Agency for International Development Emerging Pandemic Threats 2 program, focusing on disease surveillance, training and outbreak response. (2014-11-24)

Natural disaster preparations may aid businesses' pandemic response
The benefits of preparing for natural disasters may extend to scenarios outside of earthquakes, hurricanes and wildfires. A new survey from NIST and NOAA shows that many small and medium businesses are finding disaster preparation measures, such as telework readiness, helpful during the pandemic. (2020-10-19)

Digital strategies to fight COVID-19
Dr Guy Fagherazzi, Research Leader in ''Digital Epidemiology and E-health'' and colleagues from the Department of Population Health of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) released an editorial on June 16th reviewing international digital responses to the pandemic - including the ''Predi-COVID study'' - and providing recommendations for future initiatives. Published in the prestigious ''Journal of Medical Internet Research'', the paper was selected as a featured editorial for the launch of a dedicated article series on COVID-19. (2020-06-16)

Early impact of COVID-19 on scientists revealed in global survey of 25,000
The initial impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the scientific community has been revealed in one of the largest academic surveys ever conducted. Open access academic publisher Frontiers surveyed more than 25,000 members of its scientific research community from 152 countries between May and June this year to assess the initial impact of the virus on them and their work. (2020-11-02)

Evolution of pandemic coronavirus outlines path from animals to humans
A team of scientists studying the origin of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that has caused the COVID-19 pandemic, found that it was especially well-suited to jump from animals to humans by shapeshifting as it gained the ability to infect human cells. (2020-05-29)

Virtual therapy: The 'new normal' after COVID-19
The expansion of telepsychiatry may outlast the COVID-19 pandemic that caused it. When the stay-at-home order took effect in West Virginia, James Berry--a clinician with the WVU School of Medicine--was part of the team that moved the Chestnut Ridge Center's therapy sessions online. (2020-12-11)

What makes COVID misinformation so tough to stop on social media
A recent study highlights two of the reasons that misinformation about COVID-19 is so difficult to tackle on social media: most people think they're above average at spotting misinformation; and misinformation often triggers negative emotions that resonate with people. The findings may help communicators share accurate information more effectively. (2020-12-07)

Double dose of antiviral drug offers no added benefit in severe influenza
Giving double doses of the antiviral drug oseltamivir, or Tamiflu, offers no clinical or virological advantages over a standard dose for patients admitted to hospital with severe influenza infection, according to a randomized trial published today and funded by the Wellcome Trust, US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Singapore National Medical Research Council. (2013-05-30)

College students displaced from campus due to COVID-19 show worse psychological outcomes
In a new study of 791 undergraduate and graduate students, surveyed between April 9 and August 4, 2020, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston University's School of Social Work, and McLean Hospital revealed that students forced to relocate during the spring were more likely to report COVID-19-related grief, loneliness and generalized anxiety symptoms than students who did not relocate. (2021-02-23)

Web searches for insomnia surged at height of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders
A study found a significant increase in the number of online search queries for ''insomnia'' between April and May 2020, when governments across the U.S. and around the world implemented stay-at-home orders in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-18)

Belief in conspiracy theories is a barrier to controlling spread of COVID-19
Belief in conspiracy theories about the coronavirus pandemic was inversely related to the perceived threat of the pandemic; taking of preventive actions, including wearing a face mask; and the intention to be vaccinated when there is a COVID-19 vaccine. The research is based on two-wave panel study in March and July of 840 U.S. adults. (2020-09-21)

Precaution: Lessons from COVID-19
Which is more important in the initial phase of a pandemic: taking precautionary actions or responding to its severity? That is the question that researchers from SUTD set out to address in an article published in BioEssays. (2020-10-27)

A single strain of plague bacteria sparked multiple historical and modern pandemics
A single entry of the plague bacterium into Europe was responsible for the Black Plague of the mid-14th century. This same strain sparked recurrent outbreaks on the continent over the following four centuries before spreading to China, where it triggered the third plague pandemic in the late 19th century. The wave of plague that traveled to Asia later became the source population for modern-day epidemics around the globe, reveals genome analyses of the bacterium. (2016-06-08)

Young physicist 'squares the numbers' on time travel
Paradox-free time travel is theoretically possible, according to the mathematical modelling of a prodigious University of Queensland undergraduate student. (2020-09-23)

The COVID-19 pandemic reveals the potential of telehealth to improve care
Two new articles provide insights on the use of telehealth or virtual care in the age of COVID-19 and beyond, pointing to its value to not only prevent contagious diseases but also to provide access to effective and equitable care. (2020-05-12)

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