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Better passwords get with the beat
No password is 100 percent secure. There are always ways and means for those with malicious intent to hack, crack or socially engineer access to a password. Indeed, there are more and more websites and databases compromised on a seemingly daily basis. A new approach to verifying passwords that also takes into account the speed with which a user types in their login and the gaps between characters would render a stolen password useless. (2011-05-17)

Researchers expose vulnerabilities of password managers
Researchers at the University of York have shown that some commercial password managers may not be a watertight way to ensure cyber security. After creating a malicious app to impersonate a legitimate Google app, they were able to fool two out of five of the password managers they tested into giving away a password. (2020-03-16)

New NIST guidelines for organization-wide password management
When an employee has so many complex passwords to remember that he keeps them on a sticky note attached to his computer screen, that could be a sign that your organization needs a wiser policy for passwords, one that balances risk and complexity. New guidelines for institution-wide password management issued by NIST could help. (2009-04-23)

Stringent password policies help prevent fraud, study finds
An Indiana University study finds stringent password rules that encourage longer and more complicated passwords significantly lower the risk of personal data breaches, especially among employees at large organizations that handle sensitive data, like universities. (2018-10-11)

Phoney protection for passwords
Corporate data breaches seem to be on the rise, rarely a week passes without a company revealing that its database has been hacked and regrettably usernames, passwords, credit card details and its customers' personal information has been leaked on to the open internet. A new protection, nicknamed Phoney, is reported in the International Journal of Embedded Systems. (2016-05-04)

Do you know why and how you forget passwords?
Do you frequently forget passwords to a baffling array of accounts and websites? Much depends on a password's importance and how often you use it, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick-led study that could spur improved password technology and use. (2018-09-06)

'Inconsistent and misleading' password meters could increase risk of cyber attacks
With the worst passwords of 2019 now revealed, and technology topping many festive wish lists, a new study by the University of Plymouth assessed the effectiveness of password meters that people are likely to use or encounter on a regular basis. (2019-12-19)

Study reveals major websites could be doing more to promote improved password security
Online giants including Amazon and LinkedIn could be doing far more to raise awareness of the need for better password practices among their users, a study by Plymouth University has found. (2014-12-22)

Feature stops apps from stealing phone users' passwords
ScreenPass, built by Duke computer scientist Landon Cox and his team, adds security to app logins on touchscreen devices. (2013-06-26)

Geographical passwords worth their salt
It's much easier to remember a place you have visited than a long, complicated password, which is why computer scientist Ziyad Al-Salloum of ZSS-Research in Ras Al Khaimah, UAE, is developing a system he calls geographical passwords. (2014-02-14)

'Your password is invalid': Improving website password practices
Internet users are increasingly asked to register with a user name and password before being able to access the content of many sites. In their upcoming Ergonomics in Design article, (2012-01-31)

Free E-mail Services Are Vulnerable To Hackers
Free Web-based e-mail services are vulnerable to hackers, according to findings by an Internet security consultancy in Maryland, US. They found that the three biggest Web-based e- mail services failed to provide a basic security feature that helps keep hackers out. (1999-05-05)

Social engineering: Password in exchange for chocolate
It requires a lot of effort and expense for computer hackers to program a Trojan virus and infiltrate individual or company computers. They are therefore increasingly relying on psychological strategies to manipulate computer users into voluntarily divulging their login details. These methods are known as 'social engineering.' For the first time, psychologists at the University of Luxembourg have conducted a large-scale study (involving 1,208 people) to investigate how people are manipulated into sharing their passwords with complete strangers in return for small gifts. (2016-05-12)

Decade of research shows little improvement in websites' password guidance
Leading brands including Amazon and Wikipedia are failing to support users with advice on how to securely protect their data, a study shows. (2018-07-17)

Fairy-wren babies need password for food
It's always a good idea to listen to your mother, but that goes double for baby fairy-wrens even before they are hatched. If those fairy-wren babies want to be fed, they need to have a password -- a single unique note -- taught to them by their mothers from outside the egg. The nestlings incorporate that password right into their begging calls, according to researchers who report their discovery online on Nov. 8 in Current Biology. (2012-11-08)

Geophysicist to receive $500,000 MacArthur grant for genius in predicting seismic activity
A geophysicist will receive a 2005 MacArthur Fellowship for work in researching the (2005-09-20)

Biochemist to receive $500,000 MacArthur grant for genius in drug research
A biochemist will receive a 2005 MacArthur Fellowship for work in ways to produce and discover better drugs via (2005-09-20)

Grammar undercuts security of long computer passwords
When writing or speaking, good grammar helps people make themselves be understood. But when used to concoct a long computer password, grammar -- good or bad -- provides crucial hints that can help someone crack that password, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated. (2013-01-24)

Chemist to receive $500,000 MacArthur grant for genius in computing models for molecular reactions
A theoretical chemist will receive $500,000 MacArthur grant for genius in (2005-09-20)

Biologist to receive $500,000 MacArthur grant for genius in innovative gene, molecule studies
A biologist will receive a 2005 MacArthur Fellowship for work in the role of genes and molecules in multicellular and unicellular life and the process of evolution. The grants, awarded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, will be announced publicly on Tuesday, September 20th. The name of the awardee and background material will be available on a password protected Web site on Friday, September 16th. (2005-09-20)

Computer scientist to receive $500,000 MacArthur grant for genius in research on searchable networks
A computer scientist will receive a 2005 MacArthur Fellowship for work in revealing the deep structure of complex networks and creating new methods to extract the information embedded in them. The grants, awarded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, will be announced publicly on Tuesday, September 20th. The name of the awardee and background material will be available on a password protected Web site on Friday, September 16th. (2005-09-20)

Berkley researcher to receive $500,000 MacArthur grant for genius in learning and memory functions
A Berkley scientist will receive a 2005 MacArthur Fellowship for work in helping to understand how learning and memory functions in the nervous system, which also has impact on the development of new treatments for neurological and psychiatric diseases. The grants, awarded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, will be announced publicly on Tuesday, September 20th. The name of the awardee will be available on a password protected Web site on Friday, September 16th. (2005-09-20)

Laser technologist to receive $500,000 MacArthur grant for genius in innovative laser applications
A laser technologist will receive a 2005 MacArthur Fellowship for work in engineering state-of-the-art lasers for novel applications in environmental monitoring, clinical diagnoses, chemical process control, and weaponry for homeland security. The grants, awarded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, will be announced publicly on Tuesday, September 20th. The name of the awardee and background material will be available on a password protected Web site on Friday, September 16th. (2005-09-20)

Pharmacist to receive $500,000 MacArthur grant in reducing medication error
A pharmacist will receive a 2005 MacArthur Fellowship for work in reducing preventable drug and drug delivery mistakes. The grants, awarded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, will be announced publicly on Tuesday, September 20th. The name of the awardee will be available on a password protected Web site on Friday, September 16th. (2005-09-20)

Biologist to receive MacArthur grant for discovering species and revealing conservation needs
A conservation biologist will receive a 2005 MacArthur Fellowship for work in studying and protecting endangered and previously unknown plants and animals of Madagascar. The grants, awarded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, will be announced publicly on Tuesday, September 20th. The names of the awardees will be available on a password protected Web site on Friday, September 16th. (2005-09-20)

Basic password guidance can dramatically improve account security, study shows
Technology users who receive guidance when setting passwords -- including how likely it is that hackers could break into their accounts -- are significantly more likely to make their choices secure, according to research by the University of Plymouth, McGill University and Purdue University. (2018-02-28)

Strong protection for weak passwords
The combination of simple codes and Captchas, which are even more encrypted using a chaotic process, produces effective password protection. (2011-04-20)

People are still the weakest link in computer and internet security, study finds
Two decades ago, studies showed that computer users were violating best practices for setting up hack-proof passwords, and not much has changed since then. What's clear, say researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and IT University in Copenhagen, is that until human factors/ergonomics methods are applied to the problem, it isn't likely to go away. They will present the results of their CIS study at the upcoming HFES 53rd Annual Meeting on October 19. (2009-10-09)

MacArthur Fellowships of $500,000 awarded for genius in reducing cervical and breast cancer
Two 2005 MacArthur Fellowships will be awarded to individuals for their work in health: a researcher, for work in reducing cervical cancer mortality rates in developing countries, and a researcher for work in identifying risk factors for breast cancer in Afro-American and African women, particularly. (2005-09-20)

Human error puts online banking security at risk
Using an SMS password as an added security measure for Internet banking is no guarantee your money is safe, according to a new Queensland University of Technology study which reveals online customers are not protecting their accounts. Mohammed AlZomai, from QUT's Information Security Institute, said one in five online transactions was vulnerable to obvious attacks despite added security methods such as SMS passwords being adopted. (2007-11-06)

Africa's doctors' access assessed
Problems with passwords, electricity power outages and meddling librarians often come between African postgraduate doctors and free online journal articles. But according to independent research published in the online open access journal BMC Health Services Research, these doctors in training are making regular use of online medical literature, even if some have to use their local Internet café to gain access. (2007-05-16)

Scientists identify neural basis for parasitic cowbird's secret password
Scientists identify neural basis for parasitic cowbird's secret password. (2017-04-18)

Password managers vulnerable to insider hacking
A new study shows that communication channels between different parts and pieces of computer software are prone to security breaches. Anyone with access to a shared computer -- co-workers, family members, or guests -- can attack or involuntarily subject it to security breaches. (2018-08-15)

Carnegie Mellon, Stanford researchers devise method to safely share password data
An unfortunate reality for cybersecurity researchers is that real-world data for their research too often comes via a security breach. Now computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon and Stanford universities have devised a way to let organizations share statistics about their users' passwords without putting those same customers at risk of being hacked. (2016-02-22)

Computer scientists develop a simple tool to tell if websites suffered a data breach
Computer scientists have built and successfully tested a tool designed to detect when websites are hacked by monitoring the activity of email accounts associated with them. The researchers were surprised to find that almost 1 percent of the websites they tested had suffered a data breach during their 18-month study period, regardless of how big the companies' reach and audience are. (2017-12-12)

Say goodbye to virtual bureaucracy
Getting tired of filling in endless forms on the internet when you just want to make a simple purchase or find some information? Had enough of receiving a barrage of emails from companies after shopping with them online? The EUREKA project FIDELITY may have the answer. (2008-07-29)

Carnegie Mellon scheme uses shared visual cues to help people remember multiple passwords
It turns out that the way to keep track of your many passwords to online accounts is the same as how to get to Carnegie Hall -- practice, practice, practice. So researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a scheme that enables users to create 100 or more passwords by remembering -- and regularly rehearsing -- a small number of one-sentence stories. The story sentences become the basis for password fragments that are randomly combined to create unique, strong passwords for multiple accounts. (2013-12-04)

Does your password pass muster?
New research from Concordia University exposes the weakness of password strength meters, and shows consumers should remain sceptical when the bar turns green in order to create strong passwords. (2015-03-25)

Email, text or web portal? Study probes patients' preferences for receiving test results
The results of common medical tests are sometimes delivered to patients by email, letters or voice mail, but are these the most preferred methods? According to one of the first studies to look at this question, the answer is no. (2015-10-31)

Researchers unveil new password meter that will change how users make passwords
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Chicago have just unveiled a new, state-of-the-art password meter that offers real-time feedback and advice to help people create better passwords. (2017-05-08)

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