Plants Current Events

Plants Current Events, Plants News Articles.
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Clever plants chat over their own network
Recent research from Vidi researcher Josef Stuefer at the Radboud University Nijmegen reveals that plants have their own chat systems that they can use to warn each other. Therefore plants are not boring and passive organisms that just stand there waiting to be cut off or eaten up. Many plants form internal communications networks and are able to exchange information efficiently. (2007-09-25)

Plants engineered to express a fruit fly gene may help clean up environmental pollutant
Through a process called phytoremediation, researchers are using plants to clean up land contaminated with TNT, a toxic environmental pollutant and possible carcinogen. Now a new study shows how a gene found in the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, can be used by Arabidopsis plants to improve TNT removal from contaminated soil. (2016-12-07)

Caterpillar attacks allow aphids to sneak up on plants
A New Phytologist study indicates that plants prioritize the protection of flowers over leaves and that simultaneous attack by aphids, caterpillars and bacteria leaves plants vulnerable to aphids but more protected from caterpillars. (2017-12-06)

Parasites mediate plant invasions
A new study in Ecology Letters, August, Anurag Agrawal tests the hypothesis that parasites are less effective in attacking non-native plants compared to native plants. In contrast to recent surveys, a field experiment with 30 locally occurring species, revealed that non-native plants typically received equal or greater levels of attack than native plants. Thus, invasive plants may be more likely to establish only if they lack close relatives in the new habitat. (2003-08-13)

New markers of climate change
Epiphytes (plants without roots) are being investigated for their use as markers of climate change in rainforests. Monica Mejia-Chang from Cambridge University, UK, will present her research on how changes in photosynthesis and water evaporation in these plants could indicate the effects of climate change over the past 50 years. (2005-07-12)

Catchment geology rules freshwater plant communities
Whether freshwater plant communities use carbon dioxide or bicarbonate for photosynthesis is largely related to the bicarbonate concentration in their local environment, according to a new study, the first global evaluation of bicarbonate use among aquatic plants. (2019-11-14)

Wild plants are infected with many viruses and still thrive
Researchers have studied viruses as agents of disease in humans, domestic animals and plants, but a study of plant viruses in the wild may point to a more cooperative, benevolent role of the microbe, according to a Penn State virologist. (2013-02-15)

Weeds that reinvented weediness
Flowering plants are all around us and are phenomenally successful -- but how did they get to be so successful and where did they come from? This question bothered Darwin and others and a paper published in the September issue of the Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society indicates that their ability to adapt anatomically may be the answer. (2009-09-03)

Want bigger plants? Get to the root of the matter
Plant scientists have imaged and analyzed, for the first time, how a potted plant's roots are arranged in the soil as the plant develops. In this study, to be presented at the Society for Experimental Biology meeting on June 30, the team has also found that doubling plant pot size makes plants grow over 40 percent larger. (2012-06-30)

Non-native plants are 'not a threat' to floral diversity
Non-native plants are commonly listed as invasive species, presuming that they cause harm to the environment at both global and regional scales. New research by scientists at the University of York has shown that non-native plants -- commonly described as having negative ecological or human impacts -- are not a threat to floral diversity in Britain. (2015-03-23)

Stowaway fungi hitch a ride with birds to be with their plant partners
For the first time, scientists have shown that fungal hitchhikers use birds to colonize new territories with their plant partners. In a New Phytologist study, the researchers provide the first evidence that birds don't just carry plants to new places, but their fungal partners too. (2019-01-24)

Metabolism gives a boost to understanding plant and animal nutrient evolution
In the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, authors Maurino, et. al., explore the evolution of a family of enzymes, called 2-hydroxy acid oxidase, or 2-HAOX, that break down fats in both plant and animals. Their results show how plants and animals have adapted differently to similar environmental conditions in order to meet their energy needs. (2014-02-14)

UK insects struggling to find a home make a bee-line for foreign plants
Non-native plants are providing new homes for Britain's insects -- some of which are rare on native plants, a new study has found. (2019-12-16)

Fungus-enhanced plants popular with grasshoppers
Kansas State University researchers conducted a study showing that grasshoppers prefer plants with a fungal symbiosis. (2002-08-05)

How native plants and exotics coexist
Exotic plants in many ecosystems may be better competitors, but in a study in Ecology Letters researchers at Winthrop University and Brown University found that exotics can be kept in check by herbivory. (2012-11-30)

Plants that soak up sun more quickly could improve crop yields
Researchers have identified a way to manipulate photosynthesis in plants to increase both their light-harvesting ability and biomass production. (2016-11-17)

Researcher discovers pathway plants use to fight back against pathogens
Plants are not only smart, but they also wage a good fight, according to a University of Missouri biochemist. Previous studies have shown that plants can sense attacks by pathogens and activate their defenses. However, it has not been known what happens between the pathogen attacks and the defense activation, until now. A new MU study revealed a very complex process that explains how plants counter attack pathogens. This discovery could potentially lead to crops with enhanced disease resistance. (2008-03-31)

Pollination find could lead to cordgrass control
The wind transports pollen far less effectively than scientists assumed, according to a new study of invasive Atlantic cordgrass by researchers at UC Davis. This discovery will help control a cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora, that is invading wetlands on the Pacific coast. (2004-08-17)

The plant that only grows when the going's good...
Scientists have identified a new mutant plant that accumulates excessive amounts of starch, which could help to boost crop yields and increase the productivity of plants grown for biofuels. (2014-07-02)

Plants will not save us from greenhouse gases
According to researchers at McGill University, we have been overestimating the ability of plants to counteract the greenhouse effect. (2004-09-29)

Flight of the bumble bee reveals plants' flair for flower arranging
Plants can maximize their chances of reproduction by taking advantage of how insects move between flowers when they track down nectar, a study suggests. (2016-07-17)

Unique look at combined influence of pollinators and herbivores reveals rapid evolution of floral traits in plants
Pollinating bumblebees and butterflies help plants grow prettier flowers, but harmful herbivores don't, a new study shows. (2019-04-11)

Nitrogen study casts doubt on ability of plants to continue absorbing same amounts of CO2
A new study casts doubt as to whether plants will continue to absorb as much carbon dioxide in the future as they have in the past due to declining availability of nitrogen in certain parts of the world. (2018-10-23)

ASU study shows some aquatic plants depend on the landscape for photosynthesis
ASU researchers found that not only are freshwater aquatic plants affected by climate, they are also shaped by the surrounding landscape. When in an environment where CO2 is limited, aquatic plants use strategies to extract carbon from bicarbonate. Scientists identified patterns across ecoregions around the globe and discovered a direct link between the availability of catchment bicarbonate and the ability of aquatic plants to extract carbon from that bicarbonate. (2019-11-14)

The hormone ethylene is necessary for plant resistance
Dutch phytopathologists have shown that ethylene is vital for the protection of plants against bacteria and fungi. This is another function for the plant hormone already known to play a role in plant aging and fruit ripening. (2003-03-21)

Behavior breakthrough: Like animals, plants demonstrate complex ability to integrate information
A University of Alberta research team has discovered that a plant's strategy to capture nutrients in the soil is the result of integration of different types of information. Cahill found plants also have the ability to integrate information about the location of both food and competitors. As a result, plants demonstrate unique behavioral strategies to capture soil resources. (2010-06-24)

Gene protects against toxic byproducts of photosynthesis, helping plants to 'breathe'
A Japanese research team have discovered that a certain gene within plants suppresses the toxic molecules formed as byproducts of photosynthesis. These findings have potential applications for plant growth in stressful environments. The research was published on Feb. 16, 2016 in the online version of Plant Physiology. (2016-03-09)

Tomatoes resist a parasitic vine by detecting its peptide
Tomato plants deter attacks from a parasitic plant that's known to ravage crops by detecting one of its peptides, a new study reveals. (2016-07-28)

New insights into plants' conquest of land
The Earth is filled with diverse and remarkable plant forms from the tallest redwoods that pierce forest canopies, to the smallest mosses that blanket the ground underfoot. (2018-07-19)

Plants discriminate between self and non self
Two peas in a pod may not be so friendly when planted in the ground and even two parts of the same plant, once separated may treat the former conjoined twin as an alien (2005-08-09)

Common liverwort study has implications for crop manipulation
A new study on genetic pathways in the common liverwort could have future implications for crop manipulation. (2020-10-26)

Avoiding virus dangers in 'domesticating' wild plants for biofuel use
In our ongoing quest for alternative energy sources, researchers are looking more to plants that grow in the wild for use in biofuels -- plants such as switchgrass. (2013-02-15)

Plant neighbors 's(c)ent' to protect
People and animals are not the only ones who can smell. Plants are also able to perceive odors, but they process them in a very different way. While insects or mammals smell odors within a second of exposure, plants require much longer exposure times to respond. Then using this information, they react effectively to the odors emitted by infected or infested neighboring plants in order to increase their resistance to pest insects or disease. (2012-03-05)

Tapping into plants is the key to combat climate change, says scientist
The mechanics behind photosynthesis in plants could be used in the fight against climate change, a scientist at Queen Mary, University of London says. (2011-06-01)

Salt-tolerant gene found in simple plant nothing to sneeze at
Whether a plant withers unproductively or thrives in salty conditions may now be better understood by biologists. The cellular mechanism that controls salt tolerance has been found in the arabidopsis plant by Texas AgriLife Research scientist Dr. Hisashi Koiwa, and an international team. Complex-N-glycan, a carbohydrate linked to a protein in plant cells, was previously thought to have no helpful function for plant growth and to cause certain allergies in humans, said Koiwa. (2008-04-07)

Refrigerator us warm?
A discovery made at RUDN University allows to substantially increase the production of high-quality planting material of horticultural crops. (2016-09-06)

Choice of food helps hungry caterpillar
For one caterpillar, eating an unusual fruit may be the key to an easy food supply and protection against parasites, according to a team of Penn State researchers. (2004-06-07)

Plant peptide spells relief from salty stress
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a hormone-like peptide in plants that helps increase their tolerance to excessive salt. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, the study found several genes that can increase salinity tolerance, the most effective being a small gene that codes for the peptide AT13. (2018-05-14)

Grasses can acquire genes from neighboring plants
Published in the Feb. 18, 2019, edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a study led by an international team including Guillaume Besnard, CNRS researcher at the 'Evolution et diversité biologique' laboratory (CNRS/IRD/Université Toulouse III -- Paul Sabatier), reveals that the genome of Alloteropsis semialata, a grass found in Australia, contains nearly 60 genes acquired from at least nine donor grasses species. (2019-02-18)

Vinegar: A cheap and simple way to help plants fight drought
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a new, yet simple, way to increase drought tolerance in a wide range of plants. Published in Nature Plants, the study reports a newly discovered biological pathway that is activated in times of drought. By working out the details of this pathway, scientists were able to induce greater tolerance for drought-like conditions simply by growing plants in vinegar. (2017-06-26)

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