Sea Level Rise Current Events

Sea Level Rise Current Events, Sea Level Rise News Articles.
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Global sea level could rise 50 feet by 2300, study says
Global average sea-level could rise by nearly 8 feet by 2100 and 50 feet by 2300 if greenhouse gas emissions remain high and humanity proves unlucky, according to a review of sea-level change and projections by Rutgers and other scientists. (2018-10-08)

Climate change puts hundreds of coastal airports at risk of flooding
Newcastle University scientists have found that 269 airports are at risk of coastal flooding now. A temperature rise of 2C - consistent with the Paris Agreement - would lead to 100 airports being below mean sea level and 364 airports at risk of flooding. If global mean temperature rise exceeds this then as many as 572 airports will be at risk by 2100, leading to major disruptions without appropriate adaptation. (2021-01-21)

What the past tells us about modern sea-level rise
Researchers from the University of Southampton and the Australian National University report that sea-level rise since the industrial revolution has been fast by natural standards and -- at current rates -- may reach 80 cm above the modern level by 2100 and 2.5 meters by 2200. (2013-12-12)

Storm surges increase with warming oceans
Ocean warming and thermal expansion will be the largest contributor to sea-level rise during the 21st century, says an Australian scientist. (2001-02-05)

Melting glaciers raise sea level
Anthropogenic climate change leads to melting glaciers and rising sea level. Between 1902 and 2009, melting glaciers contributed 11 cm to sea level rise. They were therefore the most important cause of sea level rise. This is the result of a new assessment by scientists of the University of Innsbruck. They numerically modeled the changes of each of the world's 300 000 glaciers. Until 2100, glaciers could lead to an additional 22 cm of sea level rise. (2012-11-14)

Larger variability in sea level expected as Earth warms
A team of researchers from the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) identified a global tendency for future sea levels to become more variable as oceans warm this century due to increasing greenhouse gas emissions. (2020-08-20)

Flow of research on ice sheets helps answer climate questions
Just as ice sheets slide slowly and steadily into the ocean, researchers are returning from each trip to the Arctic and Antarctic with more data about climate change, including information that will help improve current models on how climate change will affect life on the earth, according to a Penn State geologist. (2013-02-16)

Revealed from ancient sediment: Mangrove tolerance to rising sea levels
The growth and decline of mangrove forests during the final stages of Holocene deglaciation offers a glimpse into how the ecosystems will respond to the rapidly rising seas projected for the future, according to a new study. (2020-06-04)

Projected sea-level rise may be underestimated
The rate of sea-level rise in the past decades is greater than projected by the latest assessments of the IPCC, while global temperature increases in good agreement with its best estimates. This is shown by a study now published in the journal Environmental Research Letters. Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and his colleagues compare climate projections to actual observations from 1990 up to 2011. (2012-11-27)

Significant sea-level rise in a 2-degree warming world
Even if global warming is limited to two degrees Celsius, global-mean sea level could continue to rise, reaching between 1.5 and four meters above present-day levels by the year 2300, with the best estimate being at 2.7 meters, according to a study just published in Nature Climate Change. However, emissions reductions that allow warming to drop below 1.5 degrees Celsius could limit the rise strongly. (2012-06-24)

Sea level is rising along US Atlantic coast, say Penn environmental scientists
Sea-level rise along the Atlantic Coast of the United States was 2 mm faster in the 20th century than at any time in the past 4,000 years. (2009-12-10)

Sea levels to continue rising after Paris agreement emission pledges expire in 2030
Sea levels will continue to rise around the world long after current carbon emissions pledges made through the Paris climate agreement are met and global temperatures stabilize, a new study indicates. (2019-11-04)

Rising sea levels could cost the world $14 trillion a year by 2100
Failure to meet the United Nations' 2ºC warming limits will lead to sea level rise and dire global economic consequences, new research has warned. Published today in Environmental Research Letters, a study led by the UK National Oceanographic Centre found flooding from rising sea levels could cost $14 trillion worldwide annually by 2100, if the target of holding global temperatures below 2ºC above pre-industrial levels is missed. (2018-07-03)

Under projected rates of sea level rise, a bleak future for Pacific coast tidal wetlands
Pacific coast marshes, particularly those in California and Oregon, are highly vulnerable to climate change, according to a new modeling analysis. Under higher-range sea level rise scenarios estimated to impact this region by the end of the century, all high- and mid-marsh habitats are projected to be lost. Only the low marsh habitat is likely to survive under such (2018-02-21)

Study shows rapid sea level rise along Atlantic coast of North America in 18th century
Sea levels along a stretch of the Atlantic coast of North America in the 18th century were rising almost as fast as in the 20th century, a new study has revealed. (2020-02-28)

New Jersey Shore likely faces unprecedented flooding by mid-century
Geoscientists at Rutgers and Tufts universities estimate that the New Jersey shore will likely experience a sea-level rise of about 1.5 feet by 2050 and of about 3.5 feet by 2100 -- 11 to 15 inches higher than the average for sea-level rise globally over the century. (2013-12-05)

Sea levels will continue to rise for 500 years
Rising sea levels in the coming centuries is perhaps one of the most catastrophic consequences of rising temperatures. Massive economic costs, social consequences and forced migrations could result from global warming. But how frightening times are we facing? Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute are part of a team that has calculated the long-term outlook for rising sea levels in relation to the emission of greenhouse gases and pollution of the atmosphere using climate models. (2011-10-17)

Scientists develop new method to help global coasts adapt to sea-level rise
A team of scientists, led by the University of Southampton, has developed a new method to help the world's coasts adapt to global sea-level rises over the next 100 years. (2013-10-25)

Warming oceans threaten Antarctic glaciers
Scientists have identified four Antarctic glaciers that pose a threat to future sea levels using satellite observations, according to a study published in the journal Science. (2007-03-15)

Regional sea-level scenarios will help Northeast plan for faster-than-global rise
Sea level in the Northeast and in some other US regions will rise significantly faster than the global average, according to a report released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In a worst-case scenario, global sea level could rise by about 8 feet by 2100, according to the report, which lays out six scenarios intended to inform national and regional planning. (2017-01-19)

Twenty-five years of satellite data confirm rising sea levels
Satellite data predicts current acceleration rate will cause a dramatic rise in sea level by 2100. (2018-02-12)

Long-term predictions for Miami sea level rise could be available relatively soon
Miami could know as early as 2020 how high sea levels will rise into the next century, according to a team of researchers including Florida International University scientist Rene Price. (2014-04-15)

Back to the future to determine if sea level rise is accelerating
Scientists have developed a new method for revealing how sea levels might rise around the world throughout the 21st century to address the controversial topic of whether the rate of sea level rise is currently increasing. (2014-05-09)

Ground water storage helped offset sea level rise, study says
Recent increases in the storage of excess groundwater may be helping to offset sea level rise by as much as 15 percent, a new study finds. (2016-02-11)

Migration from sea-level rise could reshape cities inland
Researchers estimate that approximately 13.1 million people could be displaced by rising ocean waters. (2017-04-17)

Penn researchers link fastest sea-level rise in 2 millennia to increasing temperatures
An international research team including University of Pennsylvania scientists has shown that the rate of sea-level rise along the US Atlantic coast is greater now than at any time in the past 2,000 years and that there is a consistent link between changes in global mean surface temperature and sea level. (2011-06-20)

Island biodiversity in danger of total submersion with climate change
Island ecosystems constitute the most biodiverse regions in the world, holding a large number of endemic flora and fauna. Islands are also under direct threat of predicted sea level rises, with gloomy prognoses predicting large areas submerged, whole islands sinking and up to 11 percent islands inundated. A study published in the open access journal Nature Conservation looks at 3 scenarios to estimate the risks posed by global change to island ecosystems. (2013-11-13)

New study from Florida Tech finds Pacific reef growth can match rising sea
The coral reefs that have protected Pacific Islanders from storm waves for thousands of years could grow rapidly enough to keep up with escalating sea levels if ocean temperatures do not rise too quickly, according to a new study from Florida Institute of Technology. (2015-07-22)

Historical records may underestimate global sea level rise
New research from scientists at University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Old Dominion University, and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows that the longest and highest-quality records of historical ocean water levels may underestimate the amount of global average sea level rise that occurred during the 20th century. (2016-10-03)

Greenland ice sheet faces irreversible melting
Scientists predict Greenland ice sheet will pass a threshold beyond which it will never fully regrow and sea levels will be permanently higher in as little as 600 years under current climate change projections, as Greenland's climate would be permanently altered as the ice sheet shrinks. (2020-12-02)

IPCC sea-level rise scenarios not fit for purpose for high-risk coastal areas
The sea-level rise scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change do not necessarily provide the right information for high-risk coastal decision-making and management, according to new research involving scientists from the University of Southampton. (2015-02-26)

Tulane study says seas may be rising faster than thought
A new Tulane University study questions the reliability of how sea-level rise in low-lying coastal areas such as southern Louisiana is measured and suggests that the current method underestimates the severity of the problem. (2019-01-30)

Study finds global sea levels rose up to 5 meters per century at the end of the last 5 ice ages
Land-ice decay at the end of the last five ice ages caused global sea-levels to rise at rates of up to 5.5 meters per century, according to a new study. (2014-09-25)

On a tropical island, fossils reveal the past -- and possible future -- of polar ice
The balmy islands of Seychelles couldn't feel farther from Antarctica, but their fossil corals could reveal much about the fate of polar ice sheets. (2015-01-08)

Global sea levels likely to rise higher in 21st century than previous predictions
New calculations by a University of Colorado at Boulder researcher indicate global sea levels likely will rise more by the end of this century than predictions made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2001. (2002-02-16)

Fastest sea-level rise in 2 millennia linked to increasing global temperatures
The rate of sea level rise along the U.S. Atlantic coast is greater now than at any time in the past 2,000 years -- and has shown a consistent link between changes in global mean surface temperature and sea level. (2011-06-20)

Scientists outline long-term sea-level rise in response to warming of planet
A new study estimates that global sea levels will rise about 2.3 meters, or more than seven feet, over the next several thousand years for every degree (Celsius) the planet warms. This is one of the first analyses to combine four major contributors to potential sea level rise into a collective estimate, and compare it with evidence of past sea-level responses to global temperature changes. (2013-07-15)

Geophysicists employ novel method to identify sources of global sea level rise
As the Earth's climate warms, a melting ice sheet produces a distinct pattern of sea level change known as its sea level fingerprint. Now, a group of geophysicists from the University of Toronto, Harvard and Rutgers Universities have found a way to identify the sea level fingerprint left by a particular ice sheet, and possibly enable a more precise estimate of its impact on global sea levels. (2012-04-24)

Sea level rise due to global warming poses threat to New York City
Global warming is expected to cause the sea level along the northeastern US coast to rise almost twice as fast as global sea levels during this century, putting New York City at greater risk for damage from hurricanes and winter storm surge, according to a new study led by a Florida State University researcher. (2009-03-15)

Risk of major sea level rise in Northern Europe
Global warming leads to the ice sheets on land melting and flowing into the sea, which consequently rises. New calculations by researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute show that the sea level in Northern Europe may rise more than previously thought. There is a significant risk that the seas around Scandinavia, England, the Netherlands and northern Germany will rise by up to about 1.5 meters in this century. (2015-06-18)

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