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Sea Level Rise Current Events, Sea Level Rise News Articles.
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Sea-level researchers win major funding
A major Southampton-led consortium project to study past and possible future sea-level rise has received a major grant award of £3.3 million ($5.3 million) over five years from the UK's Natural Environment Research Council. (2011-01-19)

New research shows growth of East Antarctic Ice Sheet was less than previously suggested
Scientists have known for over a decade that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has been losing mass and contributing to sea level rise. (2017-05-05)

Sea level will rise faster than previously thought
There are two main elements to observe when assessing sea level rise. One is the loss of the ice on land and the other is that the sea will expand as it gets warmer. Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen have constructed a new method of quantifying just how fast the sea will react to warming. Former predictions of sea level have been too conservative, so the sea will likely rise more and faster than previously believed. (2021-02-02)

How fast will we need to adapt to climate change?
Using sea-level rise as a case study, researchers at Carnegie's Department of Global Ecology have developed a quantitative model that considers different rates of sea-level rise, with economic factors, and shows how consideration of rates of change affect optimal adaptation strategies. If the sea level will rise slowly, it could make sense to build near the shoreline, but if the sea level rises quickly, then a buffer zone along the shoreline might make more sense. (2016-10-04)

Mississippi Delta marshes in a state of irreversible collapse, Tulane study shows
A key finding of the study, published in Science Advances, is that coastal marshes experience tipping points, where a small increase in the rate of sea-level rise leads to widespread submergence. (2020-05-22)

Experts available to discuss new paper detailing global sea level rise scenario
On Dec. 6, NOAA will release a technical report that estimates global mean sea level rise over the next century based on a comprehensive synthesis of existing scientific literature. The report finds that there is very high confidence (greater than 90 percent chance) that global mean sea level will rise at least 8 inches (0.2 meters) and no more than 6.6 feet (2 meters) by 2100, depending upon uncertainties associated with ice sheet loss and ocean warming. (2012-12-05)

NASA satellites measure and monitor sea level
For the first time, NASA has the tools and expertise to understand the rate at which sea level is changing, some of the mechanisms that drive those changes and the effects that sea level change may have worldwide. (2005-07-08)

State of the steric sea level rise, 1955-2003
Based on a detailed analysis of ocean vertical temperature profiles for the 1955-2008 period, Sydney Levitus, lead author, talks about the change of global average sea level induced by the observed warming of the world ocean during the past 53 years. The warming of the world ocean is consistent with the amount of warming expected as a result of the observed increase in greenhouse gases in earth's atmosphere. (2009-02-16)

Instability of antarctic ice makes projecting future sea-level rise difficult
Authors of a new study that combine a well-established sea-level rise projection framework plus a model of Antarctic ice-sheet instability suggest in a paper released today that scientists won't be able to determine until the 2060s which of two different sea-level rise scenarios is most likely to occur. Coastal communities should therefore have flexible contingency plans for a range of outcomes by the year 2100, say Robert DeConto of UMass Amherst and Robert Kopp of Rutgers. (2017-12-13)

Sea level rise of 1 meter within 100 years
New research indicates that the ocean could rise in the next 100 years to a meter higher than the current sea level -- which is three times higher than predictions from the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC. The groundbreaking new results from an international collaboration between researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen, England and Finland are published in the scientific journal Climate Dynamics. (2009-01-08)

How much does groundwater contribute to sea level rise?
Land water, including groundwater extraction, contributes far less to sea level rise than previously thought, according to a new study. (2016-05-02)

Correcting estimates of sea level rise
The acceleration in global sea level from the 20th century to the last two decades has been significantly larger than scientists previously thought, according to a new Harvard study. (2015-01-14)

A dam right across the North Sea
A 475-km-long dam between the north of Scotland and the west of Norway and another one of 160 km between the west point of France and the southwest of England could protect more than 25 million Europeans against the consequences of an expected sea level rise of several meters over the next few centuries. (2020-02-28)

Evidence from past suggests climate trends could yield 20-foot sea-level rise
When past temperatures were similar to or slightly higher than the present global average, sea levels rose at least 20 feet, suggesting a similar outcome could be in store if current climate trends continue. (2015-07-09)

Greenland Ice: The warmer it gets the faster it melts
Melting of glacial ice will probably raise sea level around the globe, but how fast this melting will happen is uncertain. In the case of the Greenland Ice Sheet, the more temperatures increase, the faster the ice will melt, according to computer model experiments by Penn State geoscientists. (2015-01-20)

Penn-led research maps historic sea-level change on the New Jersey coastline
A new study led by the University of Pennsylvania's Benjamin P. Horton, an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science, relied upon fossil records of marshland to reconstruct the changes in sea level along the New Jersey coast going back 10,000 years. (2013-05-28)

A new approach to assessing future sea level rise from ice sheets
Future sea level rise due to the melting of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets could be substantially larger than estimated in Climate Change 2007, the Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC, according to new research from the University of Bristol. (2013-01-06)

Rising sea levels of 1.8 meters in worst-case scenario
The climate is getting warmer, the ice sheets are melting and sea levels are rising -- but how much? The IPCC-report in 2013 was not able to come up with an upper limit for sea level rise within this century. Now researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute and colleagues have calculated the risk for a worst-case scenario. The results indicate that at worst, the sea level would rise a maximum of 1.8 meters. (2014-10-13)

Louisiana wetlands struggling with sea-level rise 4 times the global average
Without major efforts to rebuild Louisiana's wetlands, particularly in the westernmost part of the state, there is little chance that the coast will be able to withstand the accelerating rate of sea-level rise, a new Tulane University study concludes. (2017-03-14)

Research will help policymakers plan for sea level rise
A new study by University of Georgia researchers could help protect more than 13 million American homes that will be threatened by rising sea levels by the end of the century. It is the first major study to assess the risk from rising seas using year 2100 population forecasts for all 319 coastal counties in the continental US. Previous impact assessments use current population figures to assess long-term effects of coastal flooding. (2016-03-14)

SFU research points to unprecedented and worrying rise in sea levels
A new study led by Simon Fraser University's Dean of Science, Professor Paul Kench, has discovered new evidence of sea-level variability in the central Indian Ocean. (2019-12-23)

Sea-level rise could make rivers more likely to jump course
A new study shows that sea level rise will cause rivers to change course more frequently. (2020-08-12)

New regional sea level scenarios help communities prepare for future economic risks
New US regional sea level scenarios developed by NOAA and its partners will give coastal communities better, more localized data to help them plan for and adapt to the risk of rising sea levels to their economies and infrastructure. These new scenarios integrate updated global sea level rise scenarios with regional factors, such as changes in land elevations and ocean circulation, that influence sea level regionally. (2017-01-19)

Caspian crisis: Sinking sea levels threaten biodiversity, economy and regional stability
Coastal nations are rightly worried about a sea level rise, but in the countries around the Caspian Sea over a hundred million people are facing the opposite problem: an enormous drop in sea level. Since the '90s, the water level has been dropping a few centimeters every year. This drop will accelerate during the upcoming decades, scientists from the German universities of Gießen and Bremen calculated, together with Dutch geologist Frank Wesselingh. (2020-12-23)

Expert assessment: Sea-level rise could exceed 1 meter in this century
Sea-level rise in this century is likely to be 70-120 centimeters by 2100 if greenhouse-gas emissions are not mitigated, a broad assessment of the most active scientific publishers on that topic has revealed. The 90 experts participating in the survey anticipate a median sea-level rise of 200-300 centimeters by the year 2300 for a scenario with unmitigated emissions. (2013-11-22)

Scientists uncover a dramatic rise in sea level and its broad ramifications
Scientists have found proof in Bermuda that the planet's sea level was once more than 70 feet higher about 400,000 years ago than it is now. This had grave ramifications for the biodiversity on the planets coastlines and small islands. (2009-02-09)

Global sea levels have risen 6 meters or more with just slight global warming
A new review analyzing three decades of research on the historic effects of melting polar ice sheets found that global sea levels have risen at least six meters, or about 20 feet, above present levels on multiple occasions over the past three million years. What is most concerning is that amount of melting was caused by an increase of only 1-2 degrees (Celsius) in global mean temperatures. (2015-07-09)

Melting water's lubricating effect on glaciers has only 'minor' role in future sea-level rise
Concerns that melting water would speed up the decline of Greenland's ice sheet have been allayed by new research which shows the lubricating effect of water beneath glaciers will not significantly add to sea-level rise. (2013-08-12)

Changing Antarctic waters could trigger steep rise in sea levels
Current changes in the ocean around Antarctica are disturbingly close to conditions 14,000 years ago that new research shows may have led to the rapid melting of Antarctic ice and an abrupt 3-4 meter rise in global sea level. (2014-10-01)

Greenland ice cap melting faster than ever
Satellite observations and a state-of-the art regional atmospheric model have independently confirmed that the Greenland ice sheet is losing mass at an accelerating rate, reports a new study in Science. This mass loss is equally distributed between increased iceberg production, driven by acceleration of Greenland's fast-flowing outlet glaciers, and increased meltwater production at the ice sheet surface. (2009-11-12)

Accounting for ice-earth feedbacks at finer scale suggests slower glacier retreat
Accounting for the way the Antarctic ice sheet interacts with the solid earth below -- an important but previously poorly captured phenomena -- reveals that ice sheet collapse events may be delayed for several decades, at this major ice structure. (2019-04-25)

Breakup of glaciers raising sea level concern
The rapid structural breakdown of some important parts of the ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica is possible, has happened in the distant past, and some (2005-10-20)

New study on storm surges projections in Europe
Coastal flooding is often caused by extreme events, such as storm surges, which in some areas may be amplified by climate change. A new study develops projections for Europe for 2010-2040 and 2070-2100. According to the findings, the North and Baltic Sea coasts show the largest increases in storm surges, especially towards the east. In contrast, southern European coasts can expect minimal change. (2016-03-30)

Sea-level study brings good and bad news to Chesapeake Bay
A study of sea-level trends by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science brings both good and bad news to localities concerned with coastal inundation and flooding along the shores of Chesapeake Bay. (2010-12-20)

Port engineers need guidance incorporating sea level rise into construction designs
A survey of maritime infrastructure engineers by University of Rhode Island researchers found that the rising sea level is often not factored into designs of ports, breakwaters, fishing piers and other coastal infrastructure. (2020-10-13)

Managing coasts under threat from climate change and sea-level rise
Coastal regions under threat from climate change and sea-level rise need to tackle the more immediate threats of human-led and other non-climatic changes, according to a team of international scientists. (2014-08-29)

Study: Reducing carbon emissions will limit sea level rise
A new study demonstrates that a correlation also exists between cumulative carbon emissions and future sea level rise over time -- and the news isn't good. (2018-07-16)

Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt
New research led by climate scientists from the University of Bristol suggests that the representation of clouds in climate models is as, or more, important than the amount of greenhouse gas emissions when it comes to projecting future Greenland ice sheet melt. (2019-06-24)

Continuous satellite monitoring of ice sheets needed to better predict sea-level rise
The length of the satellite record for the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets is currently too short to tell if the recently reported speed-up of ice loss will be sustained in the future or if it results from natural processes, according to a new study led by Dr. Bert Wouters from the University of Bristol. (2013-07-14)

NOAA: 'Nuisance flooding' an increasing problem as coastal sea levels rise
Eight of the top 10 US cities that have seen an increase in so-called 'nuisance flooding' -- which causes such public inconveniences as frequent road closures, overwhelmed storm drains and compromised infrastructure -- are on the East Coast, according to a new NOAA technical report. This nuisance flooding, caused by rising sea levels, has increased on all three US coasts, between 300 and 925 percent since the 1960s. (2014-07-28)

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