Sea Level Current Events

Sea Level Current Events, Sea Level News Articles.
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Larger variability in sea level expected as Earth warms
A team of researchers from the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) identified a global tendency for future sea levels to become more variable as oceans warm this century due to increasing greenhouse gas emissions. (2020-08-20)

State of the steric sea level rise, 1955-2003
Based on a detailed analysis of ocean vertical temperature profiles for the 1955-2008 period, Sydney Levitus, lead author, talks about the change of global average sea level induced by the observed warming of the world ocean during the past 53 years. The warming of the world ocean is consistent with the amount of warming expected as a result of the observed increase in greenhouse gases in earth's atmosphere. (2009-02-16)

Global sea level could rise 50 feet by 2300, study says
Global average sea-level could rise by nearly 8 feet by 2100 and 50 feet by 2300 if greenhouse gas emissions remain high and humanity proves unlucky, according to a review of sea-level change and projections by Rutgers and other scientists. (2018-10-08)

SFU research points to unprecedented and worrying rise in sea levels
A new study led by Simon Fraser University's Dean of Science, Professor Paul Kench, has discovered new evidence of sea-level variability in the central Indian Ocean. (2019-12-23)

What the past tells us about modern sea-level rise
Researchers from the University of Southampton and the Australian National University report that sea-level rise since the industrial revolution has been fast by natural standards and -- at current rates -- may reach 80 cm above the modern level by 2100 and 2.5 meters by 2200. (2013-12-12)

Melting glaciers raise sea level
Anthropogenic climate change leads to melting glaciers and rising sea level. Between 1902 and 2009, melting glaciers contributed 11 cm to sea level rise. They were therefore the most important cause of sea level rise. This is the result of a new assessment by scientists of the University of Innsbruck. They numerically modeled the changes of each of the world's 300 000 glaciers. Until 2100, glaciers could lead to an additional 22 cm of sea level rise. (2012-11-14)

Historical records may underestimate global sea level rise
New research from scientists at University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Old Dominion University, and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows that the longest and highest-quality records of historical ocean water levels may underestimate the amount of global average sea level rise that occurred during the 20th century. (2016-10-03)

Livermore scientists show salinity counts when it comes to sea level
Using ocean observations and a large suite of climate models, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have found that long-term salinity changes have a stronger influence on regional sea level changes than previously thought. (2014-11-20)

Wobbly Planet Means Climatologists Need To Rethink Long-Term Study Of Sea-Level Variations
A graduate student at the University of Toronto uses numerical simulations to show how long-term changes in the orientation of the Earth's rotation axis, or (1998-01-22)

Caspian crisis: Sinking sea levels threaten biodiversity, economy and regional stability
Coastal nations are rightly worried about a sea level rise, but in the countries around the Caspian Sea over a hundred million people are facing the opposite problem: an enormous drop in sea level. Since the '90s, the water level has been dropping a few centimeters every year. This drop will accelerate during the upcoming decades, scientists from the German universities of Gießen and Bremen calculated, together with Dutch geologist Frank Wesselingh. (2020-12-23)

On a tropical island, fossils reveal the past -- and possible future -- of polar ice
The balmy islands of Seychelles couldn't feel farther from Antarctica, but their fossil corals could reveal much about the fate of polar ice sheets. (2015-01-08)

New tide gauge uses GPS signals to measure sea level change
A new way of measuring sea level using satellite navigation system signals, for instance GPS, has been implemented by scientists at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. Sea level and its variation can easily be monitored using existing coastal GPS stations, the scientists have shown. (2014-05-21)

Scientists develop new method to help global coasts adapt to sea-level rise
A team of scientists, led by the University of Southampton, has developed a new method to help the world's coasts adapt to global sea-level rises over the next 100 years. (2013-10-25)

Ice-sheet variability during the last ice age from the perspective of marine sediment
By using marine sediment cores from Northwestern Australia, a Japanese team led by National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) and the University of Tokyo revealed that the global ice sheet during the last ice age had changed in shorter time scale than previously thought. This study was published on May 10 in the journal Scientific Reports. (2019-05-15)

Storm surges increase with warming oceans
Ocean warming and thermal expansion will be the largest contributor to sea-level rise during the 21st century, says an Australian scientist. (2001-02-05)

The sea level has been rising and falling over the last 2,500 years
The sea level in Israel has been rising and falling over the past 2,500 years, with a one-meter difference between the highest and lowest levels. This has been shown in a new study supervised by Dr. Dorit Sivan, head of the department of maritime civilizations at the University of Haifa. (2010-01-26)

Under projected rates of sea level rise, a bleak future for Pacific coast tidal wetlands
Pacific coast marshes, particularly those in California and Oregon, are highly vulnerable to climate change, according to a new modeling analysis. Under higher-range sea level rise scenarios estimated to impact this region by the end of the century, all high- and mid-marsh habitats are projected to be lost. Only the low marsh habitat is likely to survive under such (2018-02-21)

Warming oceans threaten Antarctic glaciers
Scientists have identified four Antarctic glaciers that pose a threat to future sea levels using satellite observations, according to a study published in the journal Science. (2007-03-15)

How have changing sea-levels influenced evolution on the Galapagos Islands?
The Galapagos Islands have an iconic status in the history of evolutionary study, now new research shows that the islands' own geological past may have influenced the evolution of the chain's native species. (2014-05-06)

Rising sea levels could cost the world $14 trillion a year by 2100
Failure to meet the United Nations' 2ºC warming limits will lead to sea level rise and dire global economic consequences, new research has warned. Published today in Environmental Research Letters, a study led by the UK National Oceanographic Centre found flooding from rising sea levels could cost $14 trillion worldwide annually by 2100, if the target of holding global temperatures below 2ºC above pre-industrial levels is missed. (2018-07-03)

Flow of research on ice sheets helps answer climate questions
Just as ice sheets slide slowly and steadily into the ocean, researchers are returning from each trip to the Arctic and Antarctic with more data about climate change, including information that will help improve current models on how climate change will affect life on the earth, according to a Penn State geologist. (2013-02-16)

Penn researchers link fastest sea-level rise in 2 millennia to increasing temperatures
An international research team including University of Pennsylvania scientists has shown that the rate of sea-level rise along the US Atlantic coast is greater now than at any time in the past 2,000 years and that there is a consistent link between changes in global mean surface temperature and sea level. (2011-06-20)

New Jersey Shore likely faces unprecedented flooding by mid-century
Geoscientists at Rutgers and Tufts universities estimate that the New Jersey shore will likely experience a sea-level rise of about 1.5 feet by 2050 and of about 3.5 feet by 2100 -- 11 to 15 inches higher than the average for sea-level rise globally over the century. (2013-12-05)

Paleozoic 'sediment curve' provides new tool for tracking sea-floor sediment movements
As the world looks for more energy, the oil industry will need more refined tools for discoveries in places where searches have never before taken place, geologists say. (2008-10-02)

Back to the future to determine if sea level rise is accelerating
Scientists have developed a new method for revealing how sea levels might rise around the world throughout the 21st century to address the controversial topic of whether the rate of sea level rise is currently increasing. (2014-05-09)

Interactive map of sea level changes launched
A new interactive map that allows users to explore changes in sea level worldwide over five decades has been launched by the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level, operated by the UK's National Oceanography Center. (2011-11-23)

Preparing for extreme sea levels depends on location, time, UCF study finds
Using historical data from tide gauges that line US coasts, University of Central Florida researchers created an extreme sea level indicator that identifies how much of a role different major weather and ocean forces have played in affecting extreme sea levels in coastal areas around the country. (2019-12-18)

Geophysicists employ novel method to identify sources of global sea level rise
As the Earth's climate warms, a melting ice sheet produces a distinct pattern of sea level change known as its sea level fingerprint. Now, a group of geophysicists from the University of Toronto, Harvard and Rutgers Universities have found a way to identify the sea level fingerprint left by a particular ice sheet, and possibly enable a more precise estimate of its impact on global sea levels. (2012-04-24)

Study shows rapid sea level rise along Atlantic coast of North America in 18th century
Sea levels along a stretch of the Atlantic coast of North America in the 18th century were rising almost as fast as in the 20th century, a new study has revealed. (2020-02-28)

Fastest sea-level rise in 2 millennia linked to increasing global temperatures
The rate of sea level rise along the U.S. Atlantic coast is greater now than at any time in the past 2,000 years -- and has shown a consistent link between changes in global mean surface temperature and sea level. (2011-06-20)

Significant sea-level rise in a 2-degree warming world
Even if global warming is limited to two degrees Celsius, global-mean sea level could continue to rise, reaching between 1.5 and four meters above present-day levels by the year 2300, with the best estimate being at 2.7 meters, according to a study just published in Nature Climate Change. However, emissions reductions that allow warming to drop below 1.5 degrees Celsius could limit the rise strongly. (2012-06-24)

Evidence from past suggests climate trends could yield 20-foot sea-level rise
When past temperatures were similar to or slightly higher than the present global average, sea levels rose at least 20 feet, suggesting a similar outcome could be in store if current climate trends continue. (2015-07-09)

Study finds global sea levels rose up to 5 meters per century at the end of the last 5 ice ages
Land-ice decay at the end of the last five ice ages caused global sea-levels to rise at rates of up to 5.5 meters per century, according to a new study. (2014-09-25)

Sea levels will continue to rise for 500 years
Rising sea levels in the coming centuries is perhaps one of the most catastrophic consequences of rising temperatures. Massive economic costs, social consequences and forced migrations could result from global warming. But how frightening times are we facing? Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute are part of a team that has calculated the long-term outlook for rising sea levels in relation to the emission of greenhouse gases and pollution of the atmosphere using climate models. (2011-10-17)

Projected sea-level rise may be underestimated
The rate of sea-level rise in the past decades is greater than projected by the latest assessments of the IPCC, while global temperature increases in good agreement with its best estimates. This is shown by a study now published in the journal Environmental Research Letters. Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and his colleagues compare climate projections to actual observations from 1990 up to 2011. (2012-11-27)

Sea level is rising along US Atlantic coast, say Penn environmental scientists
Sea-level rise along the Atlantic Coast of the United States was 2 mm faster in the 20th century than at any time in the past 4,000 years. (2009-12-10)

Revealed from ancient sediment: Mangrove tolerance to rising sea levels
The growth and decline of mangrove forests during the final stages of Holocene deglaciation offers a glimpse into how the ecosystems will respond to the rapidly rising seas projected for the future, according to a new study. (2020-06-04)

Sea levels to continue rising after Paris agreement emission pledges expire in 2030
Sea levels will continue to rise around the world long after current carbon emissions pledges made through the Paris climate agreement are met and global temperatures stabilize, a new study indicates. (2019-11-04)

Ground water storage helped offset sea level rise, study says
Recent increases in the storage of excess groundwater may be helping to offset sea level rise by as much as 15 percent, a new study finds. (2016-02-11)

NASA satellites measure and monitor sea level
For the first time, NASA has the tools and expertise to understand the rate at which sea level is changing, some of the mechanisms that drive those changes and the effects that sea level change may have worldwide. (2005-07-08)

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