Semiconductors Current Events

Semiconductors Current Events, Semiconductors News Articles.
Sort By: Most Viewed | Most Recent
Page 1 of 19 | 760 Results
Computer chips by the yard -- junior scientist improves organic semiconductors
With the support of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), German junior scientist Dr. Jan Hendrik Schön from Constance, has examined the electronic properties of organic semiconductors made of pentacene with a research team at the Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey. Organic semiconductors of this kind are promising candidates for, say, organic solar cells. (2000-04-17)

UB Researchers Develop First Flexible Semiconductors
Flexible semiconductors that bend like rubber and could help expedite the transition to optical computers have been developed by researchers at the University at Buffalo. The work was reported in Applied Physics Letters (1996-11-05)

Nanotechnology: Lighting up ultrathin films
Based on a study of the optical properties of novel ultrathin semiconductors, researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have developed a method for rapid and efficient characterization of these materials. (2017-01-17)

Patented process builds better semiconductors, improves electronic devices
Jim Edgar, Kansas State University distinguished professor of chemical engineering, has received a patent for his process that can build better semiconductors and improve electronic devices. (2015-03-09)

Bending an organic semiconductor can boost electrical flow
Slightly bending semiconductors made of organic materials can roughly double the speed of electricity flowing through them and could benefit next-generation electronics such as sensors and solar cells, according to Rutgers-led research. The study is published in the journal Advanced Science. (2019-12-03)

Keep the light off: A material with improved mechanical performance in the dark
Nagoya University researchers found that zinc sulfide crystals were brittle under normal lighting conditions at room temperature, but highly plastic when deformed in complete darkness. Deformation of zinc sulfide crystals in the dark also narrowed their band gap, which controls electrical conductivity. The team's findings showed the mechanical and electronic properties of inorganic semiconductors are sensitive to light, revealing a possible route to engineer the performance of inorganic semiconductors, which are important in electronics. (2018-05-17)

Water creates traps in organic electronics
Poor-quality organic semiconductors can become high-quality semiconductors when manufactured in the correct way. Researchers at Linköping University show in an article in Nature Materials that the motion of charges in organic electronic devices is dramatically slowed down by minute amounts of water. (2019-04-29)

Doped organic semiconductors explored
Organic semiconductors are already being employed in solar cells and organic LEDs (OLEDs). Until now, however, little was known about how the doping molecules are integrated into their chemical structure. A Joint Research Team has now analyzed this question at BESSY II with surprising results. The molecules are not necessarily uniformly dispersed in the host lattice, but instead form co-crystallites. It is this very species that takes over the role as the actually doping molecule. (2015-12-14)

Newly-discovered semiconductor dynamics may help improve energy efficiency
Researchers examining the flow of electricity through semiconductors have uncovered another reason these materials seem to lose their ability to carry a charge as they become more densely 'doped.' (2017-09-05)

Chemists use abundant, low-cost and non-toxic elements to synthesize semiconductors
Javier Vela of Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory has worked with two of his graduate students to synthesize a new material for semiconductors. The chemists think the material will work well in solar cells, but without the toxicity, scarcity or costs of other semiconductors. They report their discovery in a paper recently published online by the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-14)

Let there be light
University of Utah materials science and engineering associate professor Mike Scarpulla and senior scientist Kirstin Alberi of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have developed a theory that adding light during the manufacturing of semiconductors can reduce defects and potentially make more efficient solar cells or brighter LEDs. (2016-06-16)

Rutgers physicists test highly flexible organic semiconductors
Rutgers University physicists have demonstrated extremely flexible organic semiconductors that withstood multiple bending cycles in which the devices were rolled to a radius as small as 200 micrometers. The technology holds promise for making low-cost flexible electronics -- conceivably video displays that bend like book pages or roll and unroll like posters, or wearable circuitry sewn into uniforms or athletic wear. (2013-02-15)

Semiconductors With A Twist
ONR-funded researchers at Cornell University recently announced a breakthrough in creating a universal substrate for semiconductors. (1999-04-01)

Researchers repurpose failed cancer drug into printable semiconductor
Many potential pharmaceuticals end up failing during clinical trials, but thanks to new research from the University of Illinois, biological molecules once considered for cancer treatment are now being repurposed as organic semiconductors for use in chemical sensors and transistors. (2019-10-02)

Gossard awarded prize for new materials
Arthur Gossard, professor of materials and of computer and electrical engineering at the University of California at Santa Barbara, has been awarded the 2001 James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials by the American Physical Society. The prize, sponsored by IBM, consists of a $5,000 award. (2000-11-21)

New semiconductor coating may pave way for future green fuels
Hydrogen gas and methanol for fuel cells or as raw materials for the chemicals industry, for example, could be produced more sustainably using sunlight, a new Uppsala University study shows. In this study, researchers have developed a new coating material for semiconductors that may create new opportunities to produce fuels in processes that combine direct sunlight with electricity. The study is published in Nature Communications. (2020-11-18)

Improving materials that convert heat to electricity and vice-versa
Thermoelectric materials can be used to turn waste heat into electricity or to provide refrigeration without any liquid coolants, and a research team from the University of Michigan has found a way to nearly double the efficiency of a particular class of them that's made with organic semiconductors. (2013-05-05)

Engineer's research employs semiconductors to better store, use solar energy
The National Science Foundation has awarded a $400,000 Early Career Development grant to Fuqiang Liu, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering, to improve the way solar energy is captured, stored and transmitted for use. (2013-02-20)

Bottoms up: Better organic semiconductors for printable electronics
Researchers from NIST and Seoul National University have learned how to tweak a new class of polymer-based semiconductors to better control the location and alignment of the components of the blend. Their recent results could enable the design of practical, large-scale manufacturing techniques for a wide range of printable, flexible electronic displays and other devices. (2008-09-04)

Future of portable electronics -- Novel organic semiconductor with exciting properties
Organic semiconductors have advantages over inorganic semiconductors in several areas. However, there are only a few known organic n-type semiconductors, and even they have certain drawbacks such as instability and insolubility in organic solvents. Now, scientists from Japan report on the production of a novel organic substance with potential applications as an n-type semiconductor. (2019-09-10)

A new slant on semiconductor characterization
By flipping a magnetic field, a new method developed at Northwestern University can measure variations in the local conductivity across a semiconductor. (2015-11-05)

New equation could advance research in solar cell materials
A groundbreaking new equation developed in part by researchers at the University of Michigan could do for organic semiconductors what the Shockley ideal diode equation did for inorganic semiconductors: help to enable their wider adoption. (2010-10-20)

A shift in shape boosts energy storage
More efficient photocatalysts could unlock the potential of solar energy. (2020-02-17)

New ultrathin semiconductor materials exceed some of silicon's 'secret' powers
Chip makers appreciate what most consumers never knew: silicon's virtues include the fact that it 'rusts' in a way that insulates its tiny circuitry. Two new ultrathin materials share that trait and outdo silicon in other ways that make them promising materials for electronics of the future. (2017-08-11)

Semiconductor scientists discover effect that was thought impossible
Superinjection, the effect used in lasers and LEDs creation can work in 'pure' semiconductors, which was previously considered impossible. This opens up new prospects for designing highly efficient blue, violet, ultraviolet, and white LEDs, as well as light sources for optical wireless communication (Li-Fi), new types of lasers, transmitters for the quantum internet, and optical devices for early disease diagnostics. (2019-04-22)

New research could literally squeeze more power out of solar cells
Physicists at the University of Warwick have published new research in the journal Science April 19, 2018, (via the Journal's First Release pages) that could literally squeeze more power out of solar cells by physically deforming each of the crystals in the semiconductors used by photovoltaic cells. (2018-04-19)

The iron stepping stones to better wearable tech without semiconductors
The way to better wearable electronics is dotted with iron steppingstones. Check out how Michigan Tech researcher Yoke Khin Yap's nanotubes bridge the gap with quantum tunneling. (2016-02-05)

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property
While the charge and spin properties of electrons are widely utilized in modern day technologies such as transistors and memories, another aspect of the subatomic particle has long remained uncharted. This is the 'valley' property which has potential for realizing a new class of technology termed 'valleytronics' -- similar to electronics (charge) and spintronics (spin). This property arises from the fact that the electrons in the crystal occupy different positions that are quantum mechanically distinct. (2017-07-25)

Lobachevsky University researchers obtain magnetic semiconductor layers of a new type
Researchers at the laboratory of spin and optical electronics of the Lobachevsky University (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) have obtained a new type of magnetic semiconductor layers, which demonstrate spin-dependent phenomena in the transport of charge carriers at room temperature. (2018-01-22)

This 'nanocavity' may improve ultrathin solar panels, video cameras and more
Recently, engineers placed a single layer of MoS2 molecules on top of a photonic structure called an optical nanocavity made of aluminum oxide and aluminum. The results are promising. The MoS2 nanocavity can increase the amount of light that ultrathin semiconducting materials absorb. In turn, this could help industry to continue manufacturing more powerful, efficient and flexible electronic devices. (2016-05-13)

Nanoparticle technique could lead to improved semiconductors
Devices made from plastic semiconductors, like solar cells and light-emitting diodes, could be improved based on information gained using a new nanoparticle technique developed at the University of Texas at Austin. (2007-08-06)

Demystifying nanocrystal solar cells
ETH researchers have developed a comprehensive model to explain how electrons flow inside new types of solar cells made of tiny crystals. The model allows for a better understanding of such cells and may help to increase their efficiency. (2015-01-28)

Best of both worlds
More, faster, better, cheaper. These are the demands of our device-happy and data-centered world. Meeting these demands requires technologies for processing and storing information. Now, a significant obstacle to the development of next-generation device technologies appears to have been overcome, according to a research team in Asia. Specializing in the emerging field of semiconductor spintronics, the team has become the first to report growing iron-doped ferromagnetic semiconductors working at room temperature -- a longstanding physical constraint. (2016-05-09)

A gold butterfly can make its own semiconductor skin
A nanoscale gold butterfly provides a more precise route for growing/synthesizing nanosized semiconductors that can be used in nano-lasers and other applications. (2020-02-05)

Mn-doped ZnS is unsuitable to act as a dilute magnetic semiconductor
Dilute magnetic semiconductors have recently been a major focus of magnetic semiconductor research. A laboratory from the University of Science and Technology of China explored the feasibility of doping manganese into zinc sulfide to obtain magnetic semiconductors. (2012-02-20)

Semiconductor spintronics to revolutionize the electronics industry
Ongoing research into spintronics, a method aimed at enabling spin-polarized current flow through semiconductors, is likely to result in a new class of multifunctional electronics. (2003-05-27)

Standard puts high-speed chips on the fast track
A new type of standard to be issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) this summer will help meet the need for speed in semiconductors. The (2003-07-28)

Template to create superatoms, created by VCU researchers, could make for better batteries
Virginia Commonwealth University researchers have discovered a novel strategy for creating superatoms -- combinations of atoms that can mimic the properties of more than one group of elements of the periodic table. These superatoms could be used to create new materials, including more efficient batteries and better semiconductors; a core component of microchips, transistors and most computerized devices. (2018-06-21)

New 'tunable' semiconductors will allow better detectors, solar cells
Researchers have discovered a way to use existing semiconductors to detect a far wider range of light than is now possible, well into the infrared range. The team hopes to use the technology in detectors, obviously, but also in improved solar cells that could absorb infrared light as well as the sun's visible rays. (2014-04-13)

Theoretical prediction of reverse intersystem crossing for organic semiconductors
A team of Japanese researchers developed a method to predict rate constants of reverse intersystem crossing (RISC) associated with light emission efficiency of organic semiconductors used for OLED through quantum chemical calculations with computers. (2020-09-08)

Page 1 of 19 | 760 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.