Soil Erosion Current Events

Soil Erosion Current Events, Soil Erosion News Articles.
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Vegetation can help prevent soil erosion due to wind
Dust from soil erosion due to wind can affect human health, traffic, and, on a larger scale, climate. Investigators compared different models that quantify how the wind energy spreads over an herbaceous surface using data from the Sahel region of Africa, where estimates of dust emissions remain uncertain. They found that the modeling tools give results in reasonable agreement, indicating that vegetation can decrease the amount of dust emitted from soil erosion by 6 percent to 26 percent in mass compared with bare soil. (2015-01-20)

Corn belt farmland has lost a third of its carbon-rich soil
More than one-third of the Corn Belt in the Midwest - nearly 100 million acres - has completely lost its carbon-rich topsoil, according to University of Massachusetts Amherst research that indicates the U.S. Department of Agricultural has significantly underestimated the true magnitude of farmland erosion. (2021-02-15)

Agricultural soil erosion not contributing to global warming, study shows
Agricultural soil erosion is not a source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, according to research published online today in Science. The study was carried out by an international team led by researchers at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, the University of Exeter, UK, and the University of California, Davis. (2007-10-25)

Soil erosion threatens environment and human health
Soil is being swept and washed away 10 to 40 times faster than it is being replenished around the world, destroying cropland the size of Indiana every year, reports a study by David Pimentel of Cornell University. Yet the need for food and other grown products continues to soar. (2006-03-22)

Soil area the size of Berlin lost each year due to water erosion in the EU
A recent assessment carried out by the JRC estimates that water erodes 970 million tonnes of soil every year in the EU. This would mean a one meter-depth loss of soil from an area corresponding to the size of the city of Berlin, or a one centimeter loss from an area twice the size of Belgium. (2015-09-02)

Agricultural soil erosion is not adding to global warming
Agricultural soil erosion is not a source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, according to research published online today (Oct. 25) in the journal Science. (2007-10-25)

Climate change and land use are accelerating soil erosion by water
Soil loss due to water runoff could increase greatly around the world over the next 50 years due to climate change and intensive land cultivation. This was the conclusion of an international team of researchers led by the University of Basel, which published the results from its model calculation in the scientific journal PNAS. (2020-08-24)

Global erosivity map shows differences between climatic regions
The first ever global erosivity map gives new insights into the geography of the rain's impact on soil erosion. The underlying JRC research, published in the Nature Group's Scientific Reports, highlights differences between climatic regions and calls for global action to protect our soils. (2017-07-05)

After the forest fire: Evergreen needles prevent soil erosion
Once a raging forest fire is quelled, the next worry is erosion of the landscape. Scientists show that scorched evergreen needles can play a key role in preventing erosion. These findings can help post-fire rehabilitation teams decide where to apply treatments to reduce erosion. (2003-11-18)

Pasture management and riparian buffers reduce erosion
A 12-year study was completed in Arkansas watersheds. (2017-05-08)

Unsustainable soil erosion in parts of UK
New research demonstrates unsustainable levels of soil erosion in the UK. (2020-04-22)

No-till practices in vulnerable areas significantly reduce soil erosion
Soil erosion is a major challenge in agricultural production. It affects soil quality and carries nutrient sediments that pollute waterways. While soil erosion is a naturally occurring process, agricultural activities such as conventional tilling exacerbate it. Farmers implementing no-till practices can significantly reduce soil erosion rates, a new University of Illinois study shows. (2021-01-12)

How much soil goes down the drain -- New data on soil lost due to water
According to a new study, almost 36 billion tons of soil is lost every year due to water, and deforestation and other changes in land use make the problem worse. The study also offers ideas on how agriculture can change to become a part of the solution from being part of the problem. (2017-12-15)

People cause more soil erosion than all natural processes
Human activity causes 10 times more erosion of continental surfaces than all natural processes combined, an analysis by a University of Michigan geologist shows. (2004-11-03)

Scientist uses geological observatories to monitor the health of soils
Erosion and weathering can hinder soil's ability to maintain a nutritional balance -- a process crucial to maintaining life around the globe. One scientist investigates how soil interacts with its environment and changes over both a short-term and geological time scale to shed light on the potential renewability of soil. (2010-06-17)

What's driving erosion worldwide?
ETH Zurich researchers are reexamining the causes of soil erosion around the world -- and have found that countries themselves have a surprisingly strong influence on their soil. This country effect was previously undetected. (2019-12-03)

Plant root hairs key to reducing soil erosion
The tiny hairs found on plant roots play a pivotal role in helping reduce soil erosion, a new study has found. The research, led by the University of Bristol and published in Communications Biology, provides compelling evidence that when root hairs interact with the surrounding soil they reduce soil erosion and increase soil cohesion by binding soil particles. (2020-04-03)

Carbon buried in the soil rises again
A team of researchers estimated that roughly half of the carbon buried in soil by erosion will be re-released into the atmosphere within about 500 years, and possibly faster due to climate change. (2012-11-05)

Secret agent worms tackle top-secret plot to steal our soil
Move over James Bond and Austin Powers. Here come the Secret Agent Worms. University of Illinois Extension has released a full-color kids' book that features the zany exploits of two Secret Agent Worms, Napoleon Soil and Jane Blonde. Their first adventure, The Disappearing Earth, tackles the priority-one problem of soil erosion. (2001-04-01)

Study shows no-till's benefits for Pacific Northwest wheat growers
Wheat farmers in eastern Oregon and Washington who use no-till production systems can substantially stem soil erosion and enhance efforts to protect water quality, according to research by US Department of Agriculture scientists. (2011-03-08)

Logging can decrease water infiltration into forest soils, study finds
Researchers have found that logging operations can negatively affect soil density and water infiltration within forests, particularly along makeshift logging roads and landing areas where logs are stored before being trucked to sawmills. (2016-08-17)

More market less poverty, but also more sustainable land use?
During empirical research in Benin, Dutch-sponsored researcher Esaïe Gandonou demonstrated that farmers in underdeveloped parts of developing countries make little extra effort to control soil erosion if the market to which they sell their products becomes more accessible. Although the incomes of the farmers improve, this does not lead to substantial increase in erosion control measures. (2006-02-15)

Tiny microbes make a surprisingly big contribution to carbon release
As erosion eats away at Earth's surface, some types of rocks release carbon they contain back into the atmosphere -- and now a new study suggests that microbes play a substantial role in this release. (2018-04-12)

Bioengineering with vetiver grass on Guam
A University of Guam scientist uses vetiver grass to save reefs. (2011-04-07)

RUDN University soil scientist: Deforestation affects the bacterial composition of the soil
A soil scientist from RUDN University studied the effect of forest conversion on the properties of the soil: its acidity, carbon and nitrogen resources, bacterial composition, and the activity of microorganisms. The study can help improve the methods of soil cultivation after deforestation, namely, select the best fertilizers, prevent erosion, slow down nutrient depletion, and balance the composition of the bacterial community. (2020-11-09)

Erosion process studies in the Volga Region assist in land use planning
Dr. Gusarov (Paleoclimatology, Paleoecology and Paleomagnetism Lab) has been working on erosion processes for two decades as a part of various teams. In this research, he tackled the Middle Volga Region, the one where the city of Kazan - and Kazan Federal University - are situated. (2020-04-27)

Helping Chinese farmers tackle erosion, increase profits
On the steep farming slopes of China, Bozhi Wu and his research associates are finding ways to improve economic and environmental stability. They studied intercropping with corn and either setaria grass or chili peppers. (2017-09-13)

Soil carbon 'blowing in the wind'
Australian soils are losing about 1.6 million tonnes of carbon per year from wind erosion and dust storms affecting agricultural productivity, our economy and carbon accounts, according to new research. (2013-08-06)

Conventional plowing is 'skinning our agricultural fields'
Traditional plow-based agricultural methods and the need to feed a rapidly growing world population are combining to deplete the Earth's soil supply, a new study confirms. (2007-08-08)

Global study reveals time running out for many soils - but conservation measures can help
Researchers found more than 90 per cent of the conventionally farmed soils in their global study were thinning, and 16 per cent had lifespans of less than a century. These rapidly thinning soils were found all over the world, including countries such as Australia, China, the UK, and the USA. (2020-09-14)

Studying midwest soil production, erosion and human impacts
Larsen and colleagues will study Midwest soils where remnants of the native prairie still exist, specifically in Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota. The overall topic is understanding rates at which natural soils are produced compared to how much is eroded by human intervention. (2017-03-20)

Earth's dirty little secret -- Slowly but surely we are skinning our planet
A new book examines how past civilizations have worn out their soil and says the same thing is happening now, with few places left to find new fertile soil. (2007-04-16)

Growing camelina and safflower in the Pacific Northwest
Planting these oilseed crops will require attention to wind erosion. (2014-05-16)

Manipulating biotope space can enhance beneficial biodiversity effects
Using diverse plant mixtures instead of monocultures can increase yield and other ecosystem goods and services on which humans depend. Recent studies showed that such beneficial effects of biodiversity depend on complementarity between species in resource use, as is the case if species root in different soil depths. Scaled up to agricultural systems this means that benefits of intercropping may be greater on deep soils and that soil erosion may reduce intercropping benefits. (2004-06-10)

Benefits of strip-till surface after five-year study
Researchers find improved soil properties compared to no-till method, A major result was that after just five years, soil organic matter content was 8.6 percent greater in the strip-till plots when compared to the no-till plots. Furthermore, bulk density was reduced by 4 percent and penetration resistance, the force a root must exert to move in the soil, decreased by 18 percent. (2015-07-22)

Cover crops reduce erosion, runoff
Research finds that cover crops planted after harvesting instead of rough tillage reduce soil erosion and runoff during the winter and the next season. (2010-05-18)

August 2011 GSA Today science: Understanding Earth's eroding surface with 10Be
In a groundbreaking compilation of 1528 calculations of surface erosion rates from 80 study areas from all over the world, authors provide a valuable look at how rates of erosion vary in differing climates and tectonic settings in the recent geological past. (2011-08-02)

Soil security
A group of leading soil scientists, including the University of Delaware's Donald L. Sparks, summarizes the precarious state of the world's soil resources and the possible ramifications for human security in a paper published May 7 in the journal Science. (2015-05-07)

Soil erosion winding down, not revving up, reported in the 20 August issue of Science
Fertile topsoil is probably not eroding from farmlands at the alarming rate that it's widely believed to be, suggests a new study. The results, some of the first precise measurements of a notoriously difficult to measure problem, challenge previous reports that soil erosion is becoming as serious as it was during the Dust Bowl six decades ago. (1999-08-20)

European colonization accelerated erosion tenfold
Rates of soil erosion and alluvium accumulation in North America accelerated 10-fold after Europeans colonized the continent, according to new research carried out by scientists from China, Belgium and USA. (2020-12-01)

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