Whales Current Events

Whales Current Events, Whales News Articles.
Sort By: Most Viewed | Most Recent
Page 1 of 22 | 849 Results
Current whale migration models are too simplified
New research challenges the traditional view that baleen whales (Mysticetes) migrate between high-latitude feeding areas and low-latitude breeding areas. (2016-05-03)

Ecologists home in on how sperm whales find their prey
Ecologists have at last got a view of sperm whales' behaviour during their long, deep dives, thanks to the use of recently developed electronic (2006-05-22)

Marine biology: Whales coordinate deep dives to evade predators
Groups of beaked whales reduce predation risk through extreme diving synchronization, according to a study in Scientific Reports. This behavior has not been observed in other deep diving whales and the underlying reasons have remained unclear. (2020-02-06)

News tip: Duke marine biologist calls for whale-proof fishing gear
Current efforts to disentangle an endangered right whale whose flipper is wrapped in fishing gear off the North Carolina coast, while essential, are (2004-03-26)

Whales stop being socialites when boats are about
The noise and presence of boats can harm humpback whales' ability to communicate and socialise, in some cases reducing their communication range by a factor of four. The discovery was made by Dr Rebecca Dunlop from The University of Queensland's Cetacean Ecology and Acoustics Laboratory, who monitored the acoustics and social behaviour of humpback whales off Queensland's Peregian Beach. (2019-11-28)

Antarctic whales and the krill they eat
The Western Antarctic sector of the Southern Ocean is the regular feeding ground of a large number of fin and humpback whales of the Southern Hemisphere. Around 5,000 fin whales likely migrate to its ice-free waters during summer, along with at least 3,000 humpback whales. This is according to a study that was led by Helena Herr of the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover in Germany, and is published in Springer's journal Polar Biology. (2016-05-09)

Humpback whales catch prey with bubble-nets
Marine biologist David Wiley of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and others report in the latest issue of Behaviour (Volume 148, Nos. 5-6) how humpback whales in the Gulf of Maine catch prey with advanced water technology. (2011-06-24)

Gigantic whales have stretchy 'bungee cord' nerves
University of British Columbia researchers have discovered a unique nerve structure in the mouth and tongue of rorqual whales that can double in length and then recoil like a bungee cord. The stretchy nerves explain how the massive whales are able to balloon an immense pocket between their body wall and overlying blubber to capture prey during feeding dives. (2015-05-04)

World's rarest whale seen for the first time
A whale that is almost unknown to science has been seen for the first time after two individuals -- a mother and her male calf -- were stranded and died on a New Zealand beach. A report in the Nov. 6 issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, offers the first complete description of the spade-toothed beaked whale (Mesoplodon traversii), a species previously known only from a few bones. (2012-11-05)

Humpback whale songs simplified during 'cultural revolutions'
Humpback whales sing increasingly complex songs, but University of Queensland researchers have discovered they may suddenly switch to something simpler, in a 'cultural revolution.' The study examined the structure and complexity of songs sung by the eastern Australian humpback whale population over 13 consecutive years. (2018-11-22)

New research on fossil whales' teeth shows they were ferocious predators
International research involving Monash biologists has provided new insights into how the feeding habits of the whale -- the biggest animal -- have evolved. (2017-08-30)

Whale attack simulations reveal prey escape strategies
Humpback whales feed from a range of species that have adapted to escape their fate in a variety of ways. As much as humans track their prey according to the species they are stalking, so whales lunge open-mouthed in different ways depending on the target they are hunting. (2017-07-04)

Alaska researcher investigates fin whale deaths
At least nine fin whales have been discovered floating dead in waters from Kodiak to Unimak Pass since late May. 'It is an unusual and mysterious event that appears to have happened around Memorial Day weekend,' said Kate Wynne, an Alaska Sea Grant marine mammal specialist and University of Alaska Fairbanks professor. 'We rarely see more than one fin whale carcass every couple of years.' (2015-06-18)

Study improves ability to predict how whales travel through their ocean habitat
Scientists at the New England Aquarium's Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life recently published a study that could help researchers learn where protections are needed the most for bowhead whales. (2020-11-17)

Genes 'lost' in whales and dolphins helped their ancestors transition to life underwater
When cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) transitioned from life on land to life in the sea about 50 million years ago, 85 genes became inactivated in these species, according to a new study. While some of these gene losses were likely neutral, others equipped cetaceans with ''superpowers'' for surviving in the open ocean, facilitating deep dives and paving the way for (2019-09-25)

Hippo ancestry disputed
Hippos spend lots of time in the water and now it turns out (or researchers argue), they are the closest living relative to whales. It also turns out, the two are swimming in a bit of controversy. Jessica Theodor, biology professor at the University of Calgary, and her colleague Jonathan Geisler from Georgia Southern University are disputing a recent study that creates a different family tree for the hippo. (2009-03-18)

Genetics links whale to two different ocean basins
For the first time ever, a genetic study has followed a single humpback whale from one ocean basin to another, adding to traditional notions of the migratory patterns of these majestic marine mammals in the process, according to researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), and New York University. (2005-08-16)

Antarctic killer whales may seek spa-like relief in the tropics
NOAA researchers offer a novel explanation for why a type of Antarctic killer whale performs a rapid migration to warmer tropical waters in a paper published this month in the science journal Biology Letters. One tagged Antarctic killer whale monitored by satellite traveled over 5,000 miles to visit the warm waters off southern Brazil before returning immediately to Antarctica just 42 days later. This was the first long distance migration ever reported for killer whales. (2011-10-26)

New research helps predict locations of blue whales so ships can avoid them
A new model based on daily oceanographic data and the movements of tagged whales has opened the potential for stakeholders to see where in the ocean endangered blue whales are most likely to be so that ships can avoid hitting them. (2019-07-10)

Feces from entangled North Atlantic right whales reveals 'sky-high' stress levels
In a new study published this week in Endangered Species Research, North Atlantic right whale scientists found that whales who undergo prolonged entanglements in fishing gear endure 'sky-high hormone levels,' indicating severe stress, which researchers discovered using a pioneering technique of examining scat from live, entangled, and dead whales over 15 years. (2017-11-29)

Whales turn tail at ocean mining noise
A new international study has measured the effect of loud sounds on migrating humpback whales as concern grows as oceans become noisier. University of Queensland School of Veterinary Science's Dr Rebecca Dunlop said one of the main sources of ocean noise was oil and gas exploration, due to geologists firing off loud acoustic air guns to probe the structure of the ocean floor in search of fossil fuels. (2017-08-16)

Habitat use by North Pacific right whales, Eubalaena japonica, in the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska
The small population of North Pacific right whales is one of the most critically endangered whale populations in the world. Recently these whales have been recognized as a different species from right whales seen in the North Atlantic and others in the Southern Hemisphere. To define ecological parameters critical to the survival of right whales, habitat use was investigated by scientists at the NOAA. These results were published recently in the journal Mammal Review. (2005-05-25)

New study suggests minke whales are not preventing recovery of larger whales
Genetic analyses refute the hypothesis that an overly abundant population of minke whales is creating too much competition over food for populations of other whale species to rebound, according to a new study supported by the Lenfest Ocean Program and published this week in the journal Molecular Ecology. The study's findings indicate that the Southern Ocean minke whale population around Antarctica has not grown unnaturally large in the wake of industrial whaling. (2010-01-14)

Why whales are so big, but not bigger
Whales' large bodies help them consume their prey at high efficiencies, a more than decade-long study of around 300 tagged whales now shows, but their gigantism is limited by prey availability and foraging efficiency. (2019-12-12)

Syracuse biologist reveals how whales may 'sing' for their supper
Humpback whales have a trick or two, when it comes to finding a quick snack at the bottom of the ocean. Even in the dark. Susan Parks, assistant professor of Biology in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences, in collaboration with a consortium of other researchers, has been studying these unique feeding behaviors. Her research emphasizes the importance of specific auditory cues that these mammoth creatures emit, as they search the deep ocean for their prey. (2014-12-16)

New Zealand blue whale distribution patterns tied to ocean conditions, prey availability
Oregon State University researchers who recently discovered a population of blue whales in New Zealand are learning more about the links between the whales, their prey and ocean conditions that are changing as the planet warms. (2020-05-28)

Longest mammal migration raises questions about distinct species
A team of scientists from the United States and Russia has documented the longest migration of a mammal ever recorded -- a round-trip trek of nearly 14,000 miles by a whale identified as a critically endangered species that raises questions about its status as a distinct species. (2015-04-15)

Bowhead whales come to Cumberland Sound in Nunavut to exfoliate
Aerial drone footage of bowhead whales in Canada's Arctic has revealed that the large mammals molt and use rocks to rub off dead skin. (2017-11-22)

Disappearing dolphins clamour for attention at whale summit
Small whales are disappearing from the world's oceans and waterways as they fall victim to fishing gear, pollution and habitat loss -- compounded by a lack of conservation measures such as those developed for great whales, according to a new WWF report. (2009-06-23)

Dalhousie biologists interpret the language of sperm whales
Dalhousie Ph.D. student Shane Gero has recently returned from a seven-week visit to Dominica. He has been traveling to the Caribbean island since 2005 to study families of sperm whales, usually spending two to four months of each year working on the Dominica Sperm Whale Project. One of the goals of this project is to record and compare whale calls over time, examining the various phrases and dialects of sperm whale communities. (2011-05-12)

Weak social ties a killer for male whales
Male killer whales are more likely to die if they are not at the center of their social group, new research suggests. (2017-10-24)

Whale songs are heard for the first time around New York City waters
For the first time in waters surrounding New York City, the beckoning calls of endangered fin, humpback and North Atlantic right whales have been recorded, according to experts from the Bioacoustics Research Program at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. (2008-09-16)

Researchers reveal first sightings of rare whales off New Zealand coast
For the first time in New Zealand waters an extremely rare grouping of Shepherd's Beaked Whales has been spotted from a University of Otago research vessel off the coast of the city of Dunedin in the South Island. (2016-07-07)

NOAA scientists find killer whales in Antarctic waters prefer weddell seals over other prey
NOAA's Fisheries Service scientists studying the cooperative hunting behavior of killer whales in Antarctic waters observed the animals favoring one type of seal over all other available food sources, according to a study published in the journal Marine Mammal Science. (2011-03-30)

'Bycatch' whaling a growing threat to coastal whales
Scientists are warning that a new form of unregulated whaling has emerged along the coastlines of Japan and South Korea, where the commercial sale of whales killed as fisheries (2009-06-23)

Beluga whales and narwhals go through menopause
Scientists have discovered that beluga whales and narwhals go through the menopause -- taking the total number of species known to experience this to five. (2018-08-27)

Ancient New Zealand 'Dawn Whale' identified by Otago researchers
University of Otago palaeontologists are rewriting the history of New Zealand's ancient whales by describing a previously unknown genus of fossil baleen whales and two species within it. (2014-11-18)

Whales use nested Russian-doll structure to protect nerve tissue during lunge dives
Fin whales use two neatly packed levels of nested folds to protect the nerves along the floor of their mouth during lunge feeding, according to new research from University of British Columbia zoologists. (2017-02-16)

The North Atlantic right whale population is in poor condition
New research reveals that endangered North Atlantic right whales are in poorer body condition than individual whales from the three well recovering populations of Southern right whales. This difference is alarming: poor body condition for North Atlantic right whales explains why too many of them are dying, and why they are not giving birth to enough calves to boost the population's recovery. The results has been published in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. (2020-04-27)

New study analyzes the risk to endangered whales from ships in southern California
Researchers have identified areas off southern California with high numbers of whales and assessed their risk from potentially deadly collisions with commercial ship traffic in a study published in the scientific journal Conservation Biology. (2013-03-25)

Page 1 of 22 | 849 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.