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Clinical trial demonstrates effectiveness of infant apnea prevention technology

Scientists and clinicians at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have shown in a clinical trial that a new, vibration-based prevention technology tested in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) reduces apneic events and improves critical clinical parameters in prematurely born infants.

New ASTRO template helps radiation oncologists guide cancer survivors through ongoing care

A new template published by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) standardizes and streamlines the creation of patient-focused plans for long-term cancer survivor care following radiation therapy (RT).

Breastfeeding lowers risk of type 2 diabetes following gestational diabetes

Women with gestational diabetes who consistently and continuously breastfeed from the time of giving birth are half as likely to develop type 2 diabetes within two years after delivery, according to a study from Kaiser Permanente published today in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Researchers find new, inexpensive way to clean water from oil sands production

Researchers have developed a process to remove contaminants from oil sands wastewater using only sunlight and nanoparticles that is more effective and inexpensive than conventional treatment methods.

Subsolid lung nodules pose greater cancer risk to women than men

Women with a certain type of lung nodule visible on lung cancer screening CT exams face a higher risk of lung cancer than men with similar nodules, according to a new study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Endocrine experts call for more research into leading cause of infertility

More research is needed to better understand polycystic ovary syndrome - one of the leading causes of infertility, according to the Scientific Statement issued by the Endocrine Society.

New research suggests a novel route in the fight against cancer

In a new study published today in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, scientists from the University of Surrey have uncovered a collection of important proteins that carry out and regulate critical biological processes.

Stem cell treatment mediates immune response to spinal cord injury in pre-clinical trials

When a blunt-force blow injures the spinal cord, the body's immune system can be both friend and foe. Sensing the injury, the immune system dispatches an inflammatory response composed of specialized cells called macrophages to dispose of dead tissue.

Clinical trial substantiates Wyss Institute's apnea prevention technology

Scientists, engineers and clinicians at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and its collaborating institutions, the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS), have shown in a clinical trial in the BIDMC neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) that their new prevention technology reduces apneic events and improves critical clinical parameters in preterm infants.

Evolution of severely immunosuppressed HIV patients depends on the immunologic and virologic response

Health authorities recommend HIV-infected patients starting treatment as soon as posible after diagnosis, regardless of the level of immunosuppression (which are measured by the number of CD4, cells responsible for the immune response and which are infected by the virus) and viral load.

New test may improve diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancers

By collecting samples from the portal vein--which carries blood from the gastrointestinal tract, including from the pancreas, to the liver--physicians can learn far more about a patient's pancreatic cancer than by relying on peripheral blood from a more easily accessed vein in the arm.

Climate study finds evidence of global shift in the 1980s

Planet Earth experienced a global climate shift in the late 1980s on an unprecedented scale, fuelled by anthropogenic warming and a volcanic eruption, according to new research published this week.

Netupitant/palonosetron for prevention of nausea and vomiting: Added benefit not proven

The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) examined in a dossier assessment whether the drug combination netupitant/palonosetron (trade name: Akynzeo) offers an added benefit over the appropriate comparator therapy (ACT).

Mountain ranges evolve and respond to Earth's climate, study shows

Ground-breaking new research has shown that erosion caused by glaciation during ice ages can, in the right circumstances, wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them.

Beavers restore dead wood in boreal forests

Dead wood has decreased dramatically in the boreal zone due to intensive forest management. Several species dependent on dead wood have suffered from this decline.

Combination of bevacizumab and lomustine with first recurrence of glioblastoma prolongs PFS but not OS

Results of EORTC trial 26101 presented today at The 20th Annual Scientific Meeting and Education Day of the Society for Neuro-Oncology showed that bevacizumab treatment in patients with progressive glioblastoma, despite prolonged progression-free survival, does not confer a survival advantage.

Marine airgun noise could cause turtle trauma

Scientists from the University of Exeter are warning of the risks that seismic surveys may pose to sea turtles. Widely used in marine oil and gas exploration, seismic surveys use airguns to produce sound waves that penetrate the sea floor to map oil and gas reserves.

Study counters long-time practice of prescribing more fertility hormones

A Michigan State University study has found that too much of a hormone commonly used during in vitro fertility, or IVF, treatments actually decreases a woman's chances of having a baby.

UMD study explains racial and ethnic disparities in unintended pregnancy

A new study from the University of Maryland School of Public Health examined why African American and Hispanic women have higher rates of unintended pregnancy than White women.

Researchers identify genes connecting endocrine disruption to genital malformations

University of Florida Health researchers have identified genes that are disrupted by abnormal hormone signaling at crucial points during development, a finding that may lead to a better understanding of how the most common male genital birth defects arise in humans.

Tuberculosis: Daily antibiotics recommended to prevent resistant strains

A computer model of tuberculosis has shown that approved treatments prescribing antibiotic doses once or twice a week are more likely to lead to drug resistant strains than are daily antibiotic regimens.

To save the earth, better nitrogen use on a hungrier planet must be addressed

The global population is expected to increase by two to three billion people by 2050, a projection raising serious concerns about sustainable development, biodiversity and food security.

Neuroscientists gain insight into cause of Alzheimer's symptoms

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists have uncovered a mechanism in the brain that could account for some of the neural degeneration and memory loss in people with Alzheimer's disease.

Nanomagnets: Creating order out of chaos

Miniaturization is the magic word when it comes to nanomagnetic devices intended for use in new types of electronic components.

Football strengthens the bones of men with prostate cancer

Men with prostate cancer run the risk of brittle bones as a side-effect of their treatment. But one hour's football training a few times a week counters many of the negative effects of the treatment, according to University of Copenhagen scientists.

Temple researchers: Association between stress levels & skin problems in college students

College is a stressful time in the lives of students, and a new study by researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) and Temple University found that heightened levels of psychological stress are associated with skin complaints.

Want to remember new names? Sleep on it

A new study by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) offers an additional reason to get a good night's sleep.

Blood from small children 'remembers' prenatal smoking exposure

New Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research finds that blood taken from children up to the age of five contains molecular evidence about whether their mothers smoked during pregnancy.

Seizure risk of anti-shivering agent meperidine greatly overstated

Meperidine, an opioid analgesic commonly used to control shivering in accidental or therapeutic hypothermia, has been linked to increased seizure risk, but a new study finds little published evidence to support this risk.

First-of-kind dopamine measurements in human brain reveal insights into how we learn

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists have reported measurements of dopamine release with unprecedented temporal precision in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease.

No substantive evidence for 'pause' in global warming, study finds

There is no substantive evidence for a 'pause' or 'hiatus' in global warming and the use of those terms is therefore inaccurate, new research from the University of Bristol, UK has found.

High-fat diet prompts immune cells to start eating connections between neurons

When a high-fat diet causes us to become obese, it also appears to prompt normally bustling immune cells in our brain to become sedentary and start consuming the connections between our neurons, scientists say.

New finding offers hope for diabetic wound healing

University of Notre Dame researchers have discovered a compound that accelerates diabetic wound healing, which may open the door to new treatment strategies.

NASA study finds microgravity reduces regenerative potential of embryonic stem cells

A study performed on the NASA Space Shuttle Discovery showed that exposure of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to microgravity inhibited their ability to differentiate and generate most cell lineages, needed for the development of bone, muscle, the immune system, and other organs and tissues.

Climate can grind mountains faster than they can be rebuilt, study indicates

Researchers for the first time have attempted to measure all the material leaving and entering a mountain range over millions of years and discovered that glacial erosion can, under the right circumstances, wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them.

A tick that feeds on birds may increase the range of Lyme disease

Blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are the primary vector of Lyme disease to humans, but researchers at Old Dominion University in Virginia are focusing on another tick, Ixodes affinis, even though it doesn't bite people.

Food odors activate impulse area of the brain in obese children

The area of the brain associated with impulsivity and the development of obsessive-compulsive disorder is activated in obese children when introduced to food smells, according to a study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Pembrolizumab in advanced melanoma: Added benefit for certain patients

Pembrolizumab (trade name: Keytruda) has been approved since July 2015 for adults with advanced melanoma that can no longer be surgically removed or has already formed metastases.

Loss of mastodons aided domestication of pumpkins, squash

If Pleistocene megafauna -- mastodons, mammoths, giant sloths and others -- had not become extinct, humans might not be eating pumpkin pie and squash for the holidays, according to an international team of anthropologists.

Anti-fat attitudes shaped early in life

New findings from New Zealand's University of Otago suggest older toddlers--those aged around 32 months old--are picking up on the anti-fat attitudes of their mothers.

Tandem solar cells are simply better

What is true for double-blade razors is also true for solar cells: two work steps are more thorough than one.

Liquid acoustics half way to the Earth's core

The most direct information about the interior of the earth comes from measuring how seismic acoustic waves--such as those created by earthquakes -- travel through the earth.

Earth not due for a geomagnetic flip in the near future

The intensity of Earth's geomagnetic field has been dropping for the past 200 years, at a rate that some scientists suspect may cause the field to bottom out in 2,000 years, temporarily leaving the planet unprotected against damaging charged particles from the sun.

Children who take ADHD medicines have trouble sleeping, new study shows

Stimulant medications for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) cause sleep problems among the children who take them, a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln concludes.

Vitamin D does not reduce colds in asthma patients

Vitamin D supplements do not reduce the number or severity of colds in asthma patients, according to a new study published online ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

NYU Langone enhances patient experience by reducing referrals to facilities after surgery

Referring a patient to an acute care facility following major cardiac, joint and spine surgery rather than the patient's own home may not always be necessary--according to findings of a new self-examining study from NYU Langone Medical Center.

Amblyopia, not strabismus, identified as key contributor to slow reading in school-age children

Children with amblyopia, commonly known as "lazy eye," may have impaired ocular motor function.

How the Earth's Pacific plates collapsed

Scientists drilling into the ocean floor have for the first time found out what happens when one tectonic plate first gets pushed under another.

Online porn may feed sex addicts' desire for new sexual images

People who show compulsive sexual behaviour, commonly referred to as sex addiction, are driven to search more for new sexual images than their peers, according to new research led by the University of Cambridge.

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