Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 
Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Miriam Hospital study finds smoking during pregnancy alters newborn stress hormones and DNA

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies.




Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Could reading glasses soon be a thing of the past?

A thin ring inserted into the eye could soon offer a reading glasses-free remedy for presbyopia, the blurriness in near vision experienced by many people over the age of 40, according to a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families.

Metabolic Genetics Research Paves Way to Treating Diabetes and Obesity

Breaking down complex conditions such as Type 2 Diabetes and obesity into the specific metabolic proteins and processes that underlie them offers a new approach to studying the genetics of these diseases and how they are interrelated, according to research presented today at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Biomarkers uPA/PAI-1 in breast cancer: benefit and harm of the test unclear

To make a decision for or against adjuvant chemotherapy, a test to measure the concentrations of the biomarkers uPA and PAI-1 in the tumour tissue is available for breast cancer patients.

Fresh milk keeps infections at bay

A study by LMU researchers shows that infants fed on fresh rather than UHT cow's milk are less prone to infection. The authors recommend the use of alternative processing methods to preserve the protectants found in the natural product.

Climate change alters cast of winter birds

Over the past two decades, the resident communities of birds that attend eastern North America's backyard bird feeders in winter have quietly been remade, most likely as a result of a warming climate.

Study finds inconsistent achievement of guidelines for acute asthma care in hospital EDs

A study comparing the care delivered to patients coming to hospital emergency departments (EDs) for acute asthma attacks in recent years with data gathered more than 15 years earlier finds inconsistencies in how well hospitals are meeting nationally established treatment guidelines.

Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice

Researchers have successfully transplanted "organoids" of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice - creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine.

Australian volcanic mystery explained: ANU media release

Scientists have solved a long-standing mystery surrounding Australia's only active volcanic area, in the country's southeast.

Genetic variant protects some Latina women from breast cancer

An international research collaboration led by UC San Francisco researchers has identified a genetic variant common in Latina women that protects against breast cancer.

Research reveals likelihood, onset of MS diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease

The results of the largest retrospective study of multiple sclerosis (MS) in uveitis patients has revealed that nearly 60 percent of patients with both diseases were diagnosed with each within a five-year span.

Cold sore virus increases the risk of dementia

Infection with herpes simplex virus increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at Umeå University claim this in two studies in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia.

Major breakthrough could help detoxify pollutants

Scientists at The University of Manchester hope a major breakthrough could lead to more effective methods for detoxifying dangerous pollutants like PCBs and dioxins.

Study shows medication is frequently, unintentionally given incorrectly to young children

According to Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers, 63,000 children under the age of six experienced out-of-hospital medication errors annually between 2002 and 2012. One child is affected every eight minutes, usually by a well-meaning parent or caregiver unintentionally committing a medication error.

When to count the damage?

The health and environmental implications of fossil fuel exploitation, nuclear waste or mining-related pollution are some of the more well-known effects of the increasing energy and material use of the global economy.

YouTube as Peer Support for Severe Mental Illness

People with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or bipolar disorder use a popular social media website like YouTube to provide and receive naturally occurring peer support, Dartmouth researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE.

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream

DNA has garnered attention for its potential as a programmable material platform that could spawn entire new and revolutionary nanodevices in computer science, microscopy, biology, and more.

NUS-led research team develops novel solutions to fight the obesity gene

Individuals who are genetically predisposed to obesity may soon have a therapeutic solution to combat their condition. A research team led by scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has identified several potent inhibitors that selectively target FTO, the common fat mass and obesity-associated gene.

Aspirin shown to benefit schizophrenia treatment

A new study shows that some anti-inflammatory medicines, such as aspirin, estrogen, and Fluimucil, can improve the efficacy of existing schizophrenia treatments. This work is being presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology conference in Berlin.

New test scans all genes to ID single mutation causing rare disorders

Audrey Lapidus adored her baby's sunny smile and irresistible dimples, but grew worried when Calvin did not roll over or crawl by 10 months and suffered chronic digestive problems.

I have anxiety, why is my doctor prescribing an antipsychotic?

What's in a name? Doctors have found that the name of the drug you are prescribed significantly influences how the patient sees the treatment.

iPads detect early signs of glaucoma in Nepal eye screening

Using a tablet screening app could prove to be an effective method to aid in the effort to reduce the incidence of avoidable blindness in populations at high-risk for glaucoma with limited access to health care.

Scientists opens black box on bacterial growth in cystic fibrosis lung infection

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have shown for the first time how bacteria can grow directly in the lungs of Cystic fibrosis patients, giving them the opportunity to get tremendous insights into bacteria behavior and growth in chronic infections.

Birth season affects your mood in later life

New research shows that the season you are born has a significant impact on your risk of developing mood disorders.

Group B streptococcus incidence rises significantly among newborns

The findings suggest that this disturbing trend could be due the emergence of more virulent group B streptococcal strains and call for a renewed evaluation of preventive strategies to reduce neonatal disease.

Over-organizing repair cells set the stage for fibrosis

The excessive activity of repair cells in the early stages of tissue recovery sets the stage for fibrosis by priming the activation of an important growth factor, according to a study in The Journal of Cell Biology.

Males with IBS report more social stress than females, UB study finds

One of the few studies to examine gender differences among patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has found that males with the condition experience more interpersonal difficulties than do females with the condition.

Goldilocks principle wrong for particle assembly: Too hot and too cold is just right

Microscopic particles that bind under low temperatures will melt as temperatures rise to moderate levels, but re-connect under hotter conditions, a team of New York University scientists has found.

Superconducting circuits, simplified

Computer chips with superconducting circuits - circuits with zero electrical resistance - would be 50 to 100 times as energy-efficient as today's chips, an attractive trait given the increasing power consumption of the massive data centers that power the Internet's most popular sites.

Gene Duplications Associated with Autism Evolved Recently in Human History

Human geneticists have discovered that a region of the genome associated with autism contains genetic variation that evolved in the last 250,000 years, after the divergence of humans from ancient hominids, and likely plays an important role in disease.

Vitamin D deficiency increases poor brain function after cardiac arrest by sevenfold

Vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of poor brain function after sudden cardiac arrest by seven-fold, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Dr Jin Wi from Korea. Vitamin D deficiency also led to a higher chance of dying after sudden cardiac arrest.

Scientists Identify Mutation Associated with Cleft Palate in Humans and Dogs

Scientists studying birth defects in humans and purebred dogs have identified an association between cleft lip and cleft palate - conditions that occur when the lip and mouth fail to form properly during pregnancy - and a mutation in the ADAMTS20 gene.

Viagra protects the heart beyond the bedroom

Viagra could be used as a safe treatment for heart disease, finds new research published today in the open access journal BMC Medicine.

New research shows fish intake associated with boost to antidepressant response

Up to half of patients who suffer from depression (Major Depressive Disorder, or MDD) do not respond to treatment with SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors).

Researchers find why depression and aging linked to increased disease risk

Psychological stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders are associated with increased risk for aging-related diseases, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this relation are unknown.

Whole exome sequencing closer to becoming 'new family history'

Approximately one-fourth of the 3,386 patients whose DNA was submitted for clinical whole exome testing received a diagnosis related to a known genetic disease, often ending a long search for answers for them and their parents, said researchers from the Baylor College of Medicine departments of molecular and human genetics and pediatrics and the Baylor Human Genome Sequencing Center and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires

The claim by UMass Amherst researchers that the microbe Geobacter produces tiny electrical wires has been mired in controversy for a decade, but a new collaborative study provides stronger evidence than ever to support their claims.

New tracers can identify frack fluids in the environment

Scientists have developed new geochemical tracers that can identify hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment.

Towards controlled dislocations

Crystallographic defects or irregularities (known as dislocations) are often found within crystalline materials. Two main types of dislocation exist: edge and screw type.

Study shows children who have had enterovirus infection are around 50 percent more likely to have type 1 diabetes

A new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that children who have been infected with enterovirus are 48% more likely to have developed type 1 diabetes.

Scientific breakthrough will help design the antibiotics of the future

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics - a breakthrough which will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future.

Psychologists from Bielefeld University publish study

We assume that we can see the world around us in sharp detail. In fact, our eyes can only process a fraction of our surroundings precisely. In a series of experiments, psychologists at Bielefeld University have been investigating how the brain fools us into believing that we see in sharp detail.

Head injury causes the immune system to attack the brain

Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries - stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells.

Blind cave fish may provide insight on eye disease and other human health issues

Blind cave fish may not be the first thing that comes to mind when it comes to understanding human sight, but recent research indicates they may have quite a bit to teach us about the causes of many human ailments, including those that result in loss of sight.

Sexual preference for masculine men and feminine women is an urban habit

In a world of matinee idols and cover girls it's easy to assume that humans want their men to be manly and their women womanly.

Pathological gambling is associated with altered opioid system in the brain: Reduced feeling of euphoria when compared to healthy volunteers

All humans have a natural opioid system in the brain. Now new research, presented at the ECNP Congress in Berlin, has found that the opioid system of pathological gamblers responds differently to those of normal healthy volunteers.

Smartphone approach examining diabetic eye disease offers comparable results to traditional method

A smartphone-based tool may be an effective alternative to traditional ophthalmic imaging equipment in evaluating and grading severity of a diabetic eye disease.

Women more likely to develop anxiety and depression after heart attack

Women are more likely to develop anxiety and depression after a heart attack (myocardial infarction; MI) than men, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Professor Pranas Serpytis from Lithuania.

Improved electricity access has little impact on climate change

Improving household electricity access in India over the last 30 years contributed only marginally to the nation's total carbon emissions growth during that time, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

3-D printed facial prosthesis offers new hope for eye cancer patients following surgery

Researchers have developed a fast and inexpensive way to make facial prostheses for eye cancer patients using facial scanning software and 3-D printing, according to findings released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Structure of an iron-transport protein revealed

For the first time, the three dimensional structure of the protein that is essential for iron import into cells, has been elucidated.

'Red Effect' sparks interest in female monkeys

Recent studies showed that the color red tends increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our "red" reactions.

Ebola special issue includes clinician primer

Accurate knowledge regarding Ebola is critical and pertinent for practicing physicians and clinicians given the current risk of hazardous global outbreak and epidemic.

Study examines type of exome sequencing and molecular diagnostic yield

In a sample of patients with undiagnosed, suspected genetic conditions, a certain type of exome sequencing method was associated with a higher molecular diagnostic yield than traditional molecular diagnostic methods, according to a study appearing in JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with the American Society of Human Genetics annual meeting.

Rapid agent restores pleasure-seeking ahead of other antidepressant action

A drug being studied as a fast-acting mood-lifter restored pleasure-seeking behavior independent of - and ahead of - its other antidepressant effects, in a National Institutes of Health trial.

iPhones for eye health: Capturing ocular images in difficult-to-photograph patients

Smartphone technology is a widely available resource which may also be a portable and effective tool for imaging the inside of the eye, according to results of a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Panic attacks associated with fear of bright daylight

Fear of bright daylight is associated with panic disorder, according to new presented at the ECNP congress in Berlin.

Heart rate may predict survival and brain function in comatose cardiac arrest survivors

Researchers may have developed a way to potentially assist prognostication in the first 24 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) when patients are still in a coma. Their findings are revealed today at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Dr Jakob Hartvig Thomsen from Copenhagen, Denmark.

Physicists warning to 'nail beauty fans' applies to animals too

The daily trimming of fingernails and toenails to make them more aesthetically pleasing could be detrimental and potentially lead to serious nail conditions.

University of Toronto study finds that action video games bolster sensorimotor skills

University of Toronto study finds that action video games bolster sensorimotor skills. A study led by University of Toronto psychology researchers has found that people who play action video games such as Call of Duty or Assassin's Creed seem to learn a new sensorimotor skill more quickly than non-gamers do.

Image guided radiation therapy is commonly used to ensure accuracy in treating pediatric tumors

Image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is a commonly used modality to ensure treatment accuracy in the management of pediatric tumors; however, consensus recommendations are needed in order to guide clinical decisions on the use of IGRT in treating pediatric patients, according to a study published in the September-October 2014 issue of Practical Radiation Oncology (PRO), the official clinical practice journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

Children's Genes Affect their Mothers' Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

A child's genetic makeup may contribute to his or her mother's risk of rheumatoid arthritis, possibly explaining why women are at higher risk of developing the disease than men. This research will be presented Tuesday, October 21, at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Tear duct implant effective at reducing pain and inflammation in cataract surgery patients

The first tear duct implant developed to treat inflammation and pain following cataract surgery has been shown to be a reliable alternative to medicated eye drops, which are the current standard of care, according to a study presented today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

© 2014 BrightSurf.com