Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 
Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Big data key to precision medicine's success

Technological advances are enabling scientists to sequence the genomes of cancer tumors, revealing a detailed portrait of genetic mutations that drive these diseases.




Scientists use brain stimulation to boost creativity, set stage to treat depression

A UNC School of Medicine study has provided the first direct evidence that a low dose of electric current can enhance a specific brain pattern to boost creativity by an average of 7.4 percent in healthy adults, according to a common, well-validated test of creativity.

Packing heat: New fluid makes untapped geothermal energy cleaner

More American homes could be powered by the earth's natural underground heat with a new, nontoxic and potentially recyclable liquid that is expected to use half as much water as other fluids used to tap into otherwise unreachable geothermal hot spots.

Increasing evidence points to inflammation as source of nervous system manifestations of Lyme disease

About 15% of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms.

EARTH: Fire-driven clouds and swirling winds whipped up record-setting New Mexico blaze

The massive 2011 Las Conchas Fire near Los Alamos, N.M., defied conventional fire science wisdom by racing downhill instead of uphill, and increasing intensity overnight.

BPA can disrupt sexual function in turtles, could be a warning for environmental health

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical that is used in a variety of consumer products, such as food storage products and resins that line plastic food and beverage containers.

Rare monkey photographed in Congo's newest national park, Ntokou-Pikounda

Two primatologists working in the forests of the Republic of Congo have returned from the field with a noteworthy prize: the first-ever photograph of the Bouvier's red colobus monkey, a rare primate not seen for more than half a century and suspected to be extinct by some, according to WCS (the Wildlife Conservation Society).

Novel neurodegenerative disease and gene identified with the help of man's best friend

A breakthrough study performed in an international collaboration led by Professor Tosso Leeb from the University of Bern and Professor Hannes Lohi from the University of Helsinki together with the veterinary neurologists and neuropathologists at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in the University of Helsinki has identified a gene mutation that causes a novel type of neurodegenerative disease in dogs.

Housework keeps older adults more physically and emotionally fit, CWRU researcher finds

Older adults who keep a clean and orderly home--because of the exercise it takes to get the job done--tend to feel emotionally and physically better after tackling house chores, according to new findings by a Case Western Reserve University school of nursing researcher.

NIST develops NMR 'fingerprinting' for monoclonal antibodies

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) researchers at the Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research (IBBR) have demonstrated the most precise method yet to measure the structural configuration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), an important factor in determining the safety and efficacy of these biomolecules as medicines.

Obesity associated with prostate cancer risk in African-American men

Obesity was associated with an increased risk for prostate cancer in African American men and that risk grew by nearly four times as body-mass index (BMI) increased, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Socioeconomic factors affect odds of death after a lung cancer operation

People with limited education and low income have higher odds of death within 30 days after undergoing an operation for lung cancer than those who are more educated and financially better off.

Rainforest protection akin to speed limit control

The destruction of the Brazilian rainforest has slowed significantly. With around 5000 square kilometers annually, the loss is now about 80% lower than in 2004.

Watch where you're going -- new study reveals how people avoid bumping into each other

A new study is a rare look into the delicate dynamics of social movement, and shows how people avoid bumping into each other while doing complementary, coordinated tasks such as dancing. The research reveals that people fall into a specific pattern to avoid a collision.

Research identifies barriers in tracking meals and what foodies want

Eating healthy is sometimes a challenge on its own, so technology should ease that burden - not increase it - according to new research from the Georgia Institute of Technology and University of Washington. Researchers studied how mobile-based food journals integrate into everyday life and specific challenges when using food journaling technology.

Teachers more likely to label black students as troublemakers

Teachers are likely to interpret students' misbehavior differently depending on the student's race, according to new research findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

A novel mechanism involved in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

Researchers at the Angiocardioneurology Department of the Neuromed Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalisation and Health Care of Pozzilli (Italy), have found, in animal models, that the absence of a certain enzyme causes a syndrome resembling the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

More analysis from the women's health initiative on hormones, breast cancer

Analysis of the longer-term influence of menopausal hormone therapy on breast cancer incidence in two Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trials suggests a pattern of changing influences over time on breast cancer, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Obesity significantly increases prostate cancer risk in African-American men, study finds

Obesity has a profoundly different effect on prostate cancer risk in African-American as compared to non-Hispanic white men.

Nanotubes with 2 walls have singular qualities

Rice University researchers have determined that two walls are better than one when turning carbon nanotubes into materials like strong, conductive fibers or transistors.

Wildfires emit more greenhouse gases than assumed in California climate targets

A new study quantifying the amount of carbon stored and released through California forests and wildlands finds that wildfires and deforestation are contributing more than expected to the state's greenhouse gas emissions.

Virtual reality may be effective tool for evaluating balance control in glaucoma patients

Falls are the leading cause of injury-related death and morbidity in older adults, especially those with a chronic eye disease such as glaucoma.

Red Journal's May issue focuses on the vital role of RT in modern lymphoma treatment

The "Radiation and the Modern Management of Lymphoma" issue (May 1, 2015) of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), is focused on the integral role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment.

New '4-D' lung cancer model could quicken discoveries

Without good models to study cancer metastasis -- the spread of cancer cells from one organ to another -- cancer researchers have struggled to understand tumor progression fully, and new therapies targeting the main causes of death are slow to come.

New genomic research amends earlier triple negative breast cancer finding

Weill Cornell Medical College investigators tried to validate a previously reported molecular finding on triple negative breast cancer that many hoped would lead to targeted treatments for the aggressive disease.

Dwindling bird populations in Fukushima

This is the time of year when birds come out and really spread their wings, but since a disastrous day just before spring's arrival four years ago, Japan's Fukushima province has not been friendly to the feathered.

Mapping language in the brain

The exchange of words, speaking and listening in conversation, may seem unremarkable for most people, but communicating with others is a challenge for people who have aphasia, an impairment of language that often happens after stroke or other brain injury.

Teaching children in schools about sexual abuse may help them report abuse

Children who are taught about preventing sexual abuse at school are more likely than others to tell an adult if they had, or were actually experiencing sexual abuse.

New transitional stem cells discovered

Pre-eclampsia is a disease that affects 5 to 8 percent of pregnancies in America. Complications from this disease can lead to emergency cesarean sections early in pregnancies to save the lives of the infants and mothers.

Victorian baby teeth could help predict future health of children today

The team from the Universities of Bradford and Durham analysed the teeth of children and adults from two 19th century cemeteries, one at a Workhouse in Ireland where famine victims were buried and the other in London, which holds the graves of some of those who fled the famine.

New assay helps determine lymphoma subtypes simply, quickly, and inexpensively

With the advent of targeted lymphoma therapies on the horizon, it becomes increasingly important to differentiate the two major subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which is the most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

A new mouse model for the study of neurofibromatosis

The research group of the neurofibromatosis of the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), the Institute of Biomedical Research of Bellvitge (IDIBELL) and the Institute of Medicicina Predictive and Personalized Cancer (IMPPC) has developed new mouse models for the study of principal malignant tumor associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

The CNIO links telomeres to the origins of liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis

Telomeres are DNA regions at the ends of our chromosomes that protect the genetic data of cells, preventing mutations and alterations in the DNA that could potentially cause disease.

Botox makes unnerving journey into our nervous system

New research might bring a frown to even the most heavily botoxed faces, with scientists finding how some of the potent toxin used for cosmetic surgery escapes into the central nervous system.

Early use of palliative care in cancer improves patients' lives, outcomes for caregivers

A new randomized clinical trial with Dartmouth investigators Kathleen Lyons, ScD, Tor Tosteson, ScD, Zhigang Li, PhD, and collaborators has noted significant improvement in several measures among those who began palliative care early.

ASTRO praises bipartisan Congress and President for passage of legislation to permanently fix SGR

The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) applauds the House of Representatives, the Senate and the President for milestone passage last night of the "Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act" (H.R. 2) that permanently repeals the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula, which has plagued the nation's health care infrastructure for more than a decade.

Could maple syrup help cut use of antibiotics?

A concentrated extract of maple syrup makes disease-causing bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics, according to laboratory experiments by researchers at McGill University.

Video games can power up from merely fun to meaningful experiences

It may be game over for critics who claim that video games are nothing more than a fun diversion. A team of researchers suggests that many games can be meaningful entertainment experiences for players.

An electronic micropump to deliver treatments deep within the brain

Many potentially efficient drugs have been created to treat neurological disorders, but they cannot be used in practice.

Faculty in doctoral programs more responsive to white male prospective students, research finds

Faced with requests to meet with potential doctoral students of easily identifiable gender, race or ethnicity, faculty in almost every academic discipline are significantly more responsive to white males than to women and minorities, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Wind bursts strongly affect El Niño severity

The long-forecasted El Niño event of 2014/15 did not meet expectations. On March 5, 2015, the National Weather Service finally declared a "weak" event arriving several months later than expected, formally dashing predictions that we would see a major event on par with the monster El Niño of 1997/98 that would bring much-needed rain to California and other western states.

The phthalate DEHP undermines female fertility in mice

Two studies in mice add to the evidence that the phthalate DEHP, a plasticizing agent used in auto upholstery, baby toys, building materials and many other consumer products, can undermine female reproductive health, in part by disrupting the growth and function of the ovaries.

Discovery changes how scientists examine rarest elements of periodic table

A little-known element called californium is making big waves in how scientists look at the periodic table.

With biosimilar drug development on the rise, researchers explore efficacy

In the emerging biosimilar market, biosimilar antibodies are being developed to treat conditions currently addressed by their original, targeted biological therapy.

GW Cancer Institute publishes core competencies for oncology patient navigators

The George Washington University (GW) Cancer Institute has finalized 45 core competency statements for oncology patient navigators, who have become critical members of the health care team.

New approach to muscle regeneration restores function after traumatic injury without need for donor tissue

Loss of muscle volume is a common and often debilitating outcome of traumatic orthopedic injury, resulting in muscle weakness and suboptimal limb function.

Inducing labor at full term not associated with higher C-section rates

As cesarean section rates continue to climb in the United States, researchers are looking to understand the factors that might contribute.

Study: Breastfeeding may prevent postpartum smoking relapse

While a large number of women quit or reduce smoking upon pregnancy recognition, many resume smoking postpartum.

New research agenda provides roadmap to improve care for hospitalized older adults

Older adults with complex medical needs are occupying an increasing number of beds in acute care hospitals, and these patients are commonly cared for by hospitalists with limited formal geriatrics training.

Anti-fungal drug shows promise as potential new cancer treatment

A common anti-fungal treatment has joined the ranks of drugs that may be suitable for use in treating cancer, according to research from the Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO) project published in ecancermedicalscience.

Detector at the South Pole explores the mysterious neutrinos

Neutrinos are a type of particle that pass through just about everything in their path from even the most distant regions of the universe.

Flourishing faster: How to make trees grow bigger and quicker

Scientists at The University of Manchester have discovered a way to make trees grow bigger and faster, which could increase supplies of renewable resources and help trees cope with the effects of climate change.

Discovery of new plant switch could boost crops, biofuel production

A team of Michigan State University researchers has discovered a switch that regulates plant photosynthesis - the process that lets plants store solar energy and use it to grow and produce food.

Man with restored sight provides new insight into how vision develops

California man Mike May made international headlines in 2000 when his sight was restored by a pioneering stem cell procedure after 40 years of blindness.

Bacterial 'memory' targets invading viruses

One of the immune system's most critical challenges is to differentiate between itself and foreign invaders -- and the number of recognized autoimmune diseases, in which the body attacks itself, is on the rise. But humans are not the only organisms contending with "friendly fire."

Novel online bioinformatics tool significantly reduces time of multiple genome analysis

UK research collaboration develops a new bioinformatics pipeline that enables automated primer design for multiple genome species, significantly reducing turnaround time.

Oxycodone overdose deaths drop 25 percent after launch of Prescgram

Oxycodone-related deaths dropped 25 percent after Florida implemented its Prescription Drug Monitoring Program in late 2011 as part of its response to the state's prescription drug abuse epidemic, according to a team of UF Health researchers.

Systems-wide genetic study of blood pressure regulation in the Framingham Heart Study

A genetic investigation of individuals in the Framingham Heart Study may prove useful to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of high blood pressure. The study, which takes a close look at networks of blood pressure-related genes, is published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology.

Correlation between firearm-related hospitalizations and US stock market performance: New study

Over 2001-2011, the national incidence of firearm-related hospitalizations has closely tracked the national stock market performance, suggesting that economic perturbations and resultant insecurities might underlie the perpetuation of firearm-related injuries, according to a new study published in The American Journal of Medicine.

After prostate cancer, start walking

Walking at an easy pace for about three hours every week may be just enough physical activity to help prostate cancer survivors reduce damaging side effects of their treatment, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.

Keep moving, studies advise cancer survivors

Three or more hours of walking per week can boost the vitality and health of prostate cancer survivors. Men and women who have survived colorectal cancer and are regular walkers as well report lower sensations of burning, numbness, tingling or loss of reflexes that many often experience post-treatment.

Longest mammal migration raises questions about distinct species

A team of scientists from the United States and Russia has documented the longest migration of a mammal ever recorded - a round-trip trek of nearly 14,000 miles by a whale identified as a critically endangered species that raises questions about its status.

New method helps establish South-Asian perceptions of dementia

Dementia care for south Asian people could be improved after researchers from The University of Manchester adapted a commonly used tool for judging perceptions of the disease.

More individuals discussing end-of-life wishes with loved ones

Discussing end-of-life wishes with loved ones can be difficult, but new research from the University of Missouri shows more individuals are engaging in advance care planning.

A sniff of happiness: Chemicals in sweat may convey positive emotion

Humans may be able to communicate positive emotions like happiness through the smell of our sweat, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Revised guidelines on reducing risk, treatment options for thromboembolic disease in pregnancy

Advice on preventing and treating venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy, birth and following delivery is outlined in two new revised guidelines published today (13 April) by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) and launched at the RCOG World Congress in Brisbane, Australia.

Gene in high-altitude cattle disease sheds light on human lung disease

Vanderbilt University researchers have found a genetic mutation that causes pulmonary hypertension in cattle grazed at high altitude, and which leads to a life-threatening condition called brisket disease.

Immunology: Macrophages as T-cell primers

New work by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers demonstrates that macrophages can effectively substitute for so-called dendritic cells as primers of T-cell-dependent immune responses. Indeed, they stimulate a broader-based response.

Racial disparity in cancer mortality is narrowing, suggests new study

Cancer mortality remains significantly elevated among African Americans. Between 2000 and 2010, overall mortality from cancer decreased faster among African American women and men than among Caucasians.

Adverse childhood events appear to increase the risk of being a hypertensive adult

Children who experience multiple traumatic events, from emotional and sexual abuse to neglect, have higher blood pressures as young adults than their peers, researchers report.

Inside health-reform savings

In the first year of Medicare's Pioneer Accountable Care Organization program, the 32 participating provider organizations achieved a 1.2% savings while maintaining or improving performance on measures of quality of patient care.

Perceptions of environmental damage improves over time, despite lack of real change

Invasive pests known as spruce bark beetles have been attacking Alaskan forests for decades, killing more than 1 million acres of forest on the Kenai Peninsula in southern Alaska for more than 25 years.

Novel plasma diagnostics method

Could the mundane action of switching on an energy saving light bulb still hold secrets? It does, at least for physicists.

Unnecessary preoperative testing still done on cataract patients

Although routine preoperative testing is not indicated for patients undergoing cataract surgery, researchers at UC San Francisco have found that it is still a common occurrence and is driven primarily by provider practice patterns rather than patient characteristics.

How Twitter can help predict emergency room visits

Twitter users who post information about their personal health online might be considered by some to be "over-sharers," but new research led by the University of Arizona suggests that health-related tweets may have the potential to be helpful for hospitals.

High flavoring content in some e-cigarettes may be cause for concern

The levels of chemicals used to flavour some brands of e-cigarette fluid exceed recommended exposure limits and could be respiratory irritants, in some cases, suggests research published online in the journal Tobacco Control.

Heavy snoring, sleep apnea may signal earlier memory and thinking decline

Heavy snoring and sleep apnea may be linked to memory and thinking decline at an earlier age, according to a new study published in the April 15, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Many teens try e-cigs, but few become regular users

E-cigarettes are popular with teens, including those who have never smoked, but few of those who try them become regular users, while most of those who do so are also smokers.

Brain development suffers from lack of fish oil fatty acids, UCI study finds

While recent reports question whether fish oil supplements support heart health, UC Irvine scientists have found that the fatty acids they contain are vitally important to the developing brain.

Should a political party form a coalition? Voters and math decide

Mathematical ideas and tools are often used to describe aspects of large macroscopic systems. Examples abound in areas as varied as finance to psychology.

Active aging on the up in EU, despite economic crisis and austerity

A healthy and active old age is a reality for many Europeans and is a genuine possibility for many more, despite the 2008 economic crash and years of austerity measures, according to a new United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) and European Commission (EC) report, produced at the University of Southampton.

© 2015 BrightSurf.com