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Temple-led research team finds bacterial biofilms may play a role in lupus

Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery.




Study shows second severe allergic reaction can occur hours after first

Parents of kids with severe allergies know how scary a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) is. New research offers clues as to why some kids can have a second, related reaction hours later - and what to do about it.

Researchers develop world's most sensitive test to detect infectious disease, superbugs

Infectious diseases such as hepatitis C and some of the world's deadliest superbugs--C. difficile and MRSA among them--could soon be detected much earlier by a unique diagnostic test, designed to easily and quickly identify dangerous pathogens.

Safer, with more benefits: Parents' vaccine views shifting

Over the same time period that multiple outbreaks of measles and whooping cough made headlines around the country, parents' views on vaccines became more favorable, according to a new nationally-representative poll.

Epigenetic driver of glioblastoma provides new therapeutic target

Cancer's ability to grow unchecked is often attributed to cancer stem cells, a small fraction of cancer cells that have the capacity to grow and multiply indefinitely. How cancer stem cells retain this property while the bulk of a tumor's cells do not remains largely unknown.

How ticks that carry Lyme disease are spreading to new regions in the US

Lyme disease is currently estimated to affect 300,000 people in the U.S. every year, and blacklegged ticks, the disease's main vector, have recently flourished in areas previously thought to be devoid of this arachnid.

Mass. General team generates therapeutic nitric oxide from air with an electric spark

Treatment with inhaled nitric oxide (NO) has proven to be life saving in newborns, children and adults with several dangerous conditions, but the availability of the treatment has been limited by the size, weight and complexity of equipment needed to administer the gas and the therapy's high price.

Study provides new insights into the genetics of drug-resistant fungal infections

A study by a multidisciplinary research team, co-directed by Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), offers new insights into how virulent fungi adapt through genetic modifications to fight back against the effects of medication designed to block their spread, and how that battle leaves them temporarily weakened.

S100B protein in diagnosing intracranial hemorrhage in some patients with mild head injury

Researchers conducted a prospective observational study in elderly patients and adult patients receiving antiplatelet therapy who presented with mild head injury at two trauma hospitals in Vienna: the Trauma Hospital Meidling and the Donauspital.

Fundamental beliefs about atherosclerosis overturned

Doctors' efforts to battle the dangerous atherosclerotic plaques that build up in our arteries and cause heart attacks and strokes are built on several false beliefs about the fundamental composition and formation of the plaques, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows.

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015 Vitamin C related to reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and early death

New research from the University of Copenhagen and Herlev and Gentofte Hospital shows that high vitamin C concentrations in the blood from the intake of fruit and vegetables are associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and early death.

Study identifies new way to kill the malaria parasite

Scientists have discovered new ways in which the malaria parasite survives in the blood stream of its victims, a discovery that could pave the way to new treatments for the disease.

Enriched blood cells preserve cognition in mice with features of Alzheimer's disease

Cedars-Sinai researchers have successfully tested two new methods for preserving cognition in laboratory mice that exhibit features of Alzheimer's disease by using white blood cells from bone marrow and a drug for multiple sclerosis to control immune response in the brain.

Tundra study uncovers impact of climate warming in the Arctic

Significant changes in one of the Earth's most important ecosystems are not only a symptom of climate change, but may fuel further warming, research suggests.

Pitt scientists lead consensus guidelines for thyroid cancer molecular tests

University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) scientists recently led a panel of experts in revising national guidelines for thyroid cancer testing to reflect newly available tests that better incorporate personalized medicine into diagnosing the condition.

Risk of interbreeding due to climate change lower than expected

One of the questions raised by climate change has been whether it could cause more species of animals to interbreed.

Why don't men live as long as women?

Across the entire world, women can expect to live longer than men. But why does this occur, and was this always the case?

UC Davis researchers find key mechanism that causes neuropathic pain

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have identified a key mechanism in neuropathic pain.

ASU researcher disputes claim that humans can distinguish 1 trillion odors

An Arizona State University researcher is calling into question recent findings that the human nose is capable of distinguishing at least 1 trillion odors. Rick Gerkin, an assistant research professor with ASU School of Life Sciences, says the data used in a study made public last year does not support this claim.

How to rule a gene galaxy: A lesson from developing neurons

The human organism contains hundreds of distinct cell types that often differ from their neighbours in shape and function.

Blacklegged tick populations have expanded via migration, Penn biologists show

Lyme disease cases are on the rise, with diagnoses occurring in areas that were historically Lyme-free. Scientists attribute the spread to the fact that populations of blacklegged ticks, which carry the bacteria that causes the disease, now flourish in areas once thought to be devoid of ticks.

Societal challenges and new treatments for Ebola virus disease

Since Ebola was first described in 1976, there have been several outbreaks, but all have been self-limiting. In a new Journal of Internal Medicine review, Dr. Ali Mirazimi of the Karolinska Institutet considers why the latest outbreak occurred and discusses the factors that contributed to making it the largest, most sustained, and most widespread outbreak of Ebola.

Extra heartbeats could be modifiable risk factor for congestive heart failure

Common extra heartbeats known as premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) may be a modifiable risk factor for congestive heart failure (CHF) and death, according to researchers at UC San Francisco.

Age-related cognitive decline tied to immune-system molecule

A blood-borne molecule that increases in abundance as we age blocks regeneration of brain cells and promotes cognitive decline, suggests a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco and Stanford School of Medicine.

Fundamental observation of spin-controlled electrical conduction in metals

Modern magnetic memories, such as hard drives installed in almost every computer, can store a very large amount of information thanks to very tiny, nanoscale magnetic sensors used for memory readout.

First images of dolphin brain circuitry hint at how they sense sound

Neuroscientists have for the first time mapped the sensory and motor systems in the brains of dolphins. Proceedings of the Royal Society B is publishing the results, showing that at least two areas of the dolphin brain are associated with the auditory system, unlike most mammals that primarily process sound in a single area.

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries less likely to get surgery

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries are less likely to receive surgery compared with younger patients and they experience a significant lag between injury and surgery, according to new research by an orthopedic surgeon at St. Michael's Hospital.

Protein implicated in osteosarcoma's spread acts as air traffic controller

The investigation of a simple protein has uncovered its uniquely complicated role in the spread of the childhood cancer, osteosarcoma. It turns out the protein, called ezrin, acts like an air traffic controller, coordinating multiple functions within a cancer cell and allowing it to endure stress conditions encountered during metastasis.

'Here comes the sun': Does pop music have a 'rhythm of the rain?'

Weather is frequently portrayed in popular music, with a new scientific study finding over 750 popular music songs referring to weather, the most common being sun and rain, and blizzards being the least common. The study also found many song writers were inspired by weather events.

Killer sea snail a target for new drugs

University of Queensland pain treatment researchers have discovered thousands of new peptide toxins hidden deep within the venom of just one type of Queensland cone snail.

Transition from 3 to 2 dimensions increases conduction, MIPT scientists discover

Scientists from the MIPT Department of Molecular and Chemical Physics have for the first time described the behavior of electrons in a previously unstudied analogue of graphene, two-dimensional niobium telluride, and, in the process, uncovered the nature of two-dimensionality effects on conducting properties.

Study finds people over 65 with traumatic brain injuries hospitalized 4 times as often as younger people

A disproportionate number of people hospitalized in Canada with traumatic brain injuries are 65 years or older, a new study from St. Michael's Hospital has found.

Adolescents who view medical marijuana ads more likely to use the drug, study finds

Adolescents who saw advertising for medical marijuana were more likely to either report using marijuana or say they planned to use the substance in the future, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

Dental pulp cell transplants help regenerate peripheral nerves

Peripheral nerve injuries often are caused by trauma or surgical complications and can result in considerable disabilities.

Hypertension, high cholesterol, other heart disease risk factors increasing In Asia

The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes have been decreasing in the United States and Europe, however they appear to be on the rise in Asia, particularly Japan, according to a guest editor page published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Brain imaging shows how children inherit their parents' anxiety

In rhesus monkey families - just as in their human cousins - anxious parents are more likely to have anxious offspring.

New study again shows: More strokes with intracranial stents

The risk of experiencing another stroke is higher if patients, after dilation of their blood vessels in the brain, receive not only clot-inhibiting drugs, but also have stents inserted.

Uncovering the mechanism of our oldest anesthetic

Nitrous oxide, commonly known as "laughing gas," has been used in anesthesiology practice since the 1800s, but the way it works to create altered states is not well understood.

Cactus scientists offer insights to solve future global agricultural challenges

Researchers have provided a new roadmap for tackling future agricultural production issues by using solutions that involve crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), a specialized type of photosynthesis that enhances the efficiency by which plants use water.

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia with psychiatric, medical conditions

Cognitive behavioral therapy is a widely used nonpharmacologic treatment for insomnia disorders and an analysis of the medical literature suggests it also can work for patients whose insomnia is coupled with psychiatric and medical conditions, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Producing biodegradable plastic just got cheaper and greener

Biodegradable drinking cups or vegetable wrapping foil: the bioplastic known as polylactic acid (PLA) is already a part of our everyday lives.

Lifestyle factors associated with less heart failure after 65

Adults who walked briskly, were moderately active in their leisure time, drank moderately, didn't smoke and avoided obesity had half the risk of heart failure as adults who did not optimize these modifiable risk factors.

Reducing stroke damage may be next for OCT technology widely used in vision healthcare

An optical technology already widely used in ophthalmology and other medical fields holds potential to reveal how blood flows in the brain during stroke, providing information that could someday guide new treatments and reduce stroke-induced damage to the brain.

Pazopanib improves progression-free survival without impairing HRQOL

Results of EORTC trial 62072 appearing in Cancer show that in patients with soft tissue sarcoma, whose disease had progressed during or after prior chemotherapy, pazopanib improved progression-free survival but did not change health-related quality of life.

Imaging could improve treatment of people with COPD

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) provide important information on the symptoms and exercise capabilities of people with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

Heightened hospital weekend death risk common in several developed countries

The heightened risk of death after admission to hospital at the weekend--the so-called 'weekend effect'--is a feature of several developed countries' healthcare systems, and not just a problem for hospitals in England, reveals research published online in BMJ Quality & Safety.

Increased risk of complications, death during delivery for women with epilepsy

A small fraction of pregnancies occur in women with epilepsy but a new study suggests those women may be at higher risk for complications and death during delivery, according to an article published online by JAMA Neurology.

Investigators insert large DNA sequence into mammalian cells

For the first time, researchers have used a simplified technique derived from a defense mechanism evolved by bacteria and other single-celled organisms to successfully insert a large DNA sequence into a predetermined genomic site in mammalian cells.

Drinking alcohol while pregnant is common in UK, Ireland, and Australasia

Drinking alcohol while pregnant is common, ranging from 20% to 80% among those questioned in the UK, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, reveals a study of almost 18,000 women published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Survey finds many physicians, clinicians work sick despite risk to patients

Many physicians and advanced practice clinicians, including registered nurse practitioners, midwives and physician assistants, reported to work while being sick despite recognizing this could put patients at risk, according to the results of a small survey published online by JAMA Pediatrics.

Illicit drug use may affect sexual function in men

In a study of 1159 males who illicitly used amphetamines, half of participants said drug use had no impact on their sexual functions, while the other half reported impacts such as reduced erectile rigidity and sexual satisfaction, enhanced orgasmic intensity, and delayed ejaculation.

The next anti-tuberculosis drug may already be in your local pharmacy

Testing thousands of approved drugs, EPFL scientists have identified an unlikely anti-tuberculosis drug: the over-the-counter antacid lansoprazole (Prevacid¨).

Could black phosphorus be the next silicon?

As scientists continue to hunt for a material that will make it possible to pack more transistors on a chip, new research from McGill University and Université de Montréal adds to evidence that black phosphorus could emerge as a strong candidate.

ADHD medications linked to cardiac problems in children with hereditary heart disease

Long QT syndrome (LQTS), a rare hereditary heart condition, can lead to life-threatening arrhythmias, or fast heartbeat irregularities.

Does that 'green' plasticizer make my PVC flexible enough for you?

What gives plastic objects their flexibility and reduces their brittleness is the concentration of plasticiser. For example, a chemical solvent of the phthalate family called DOP is often used.

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