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Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Genomic analysis of prostate cancer indicates best course of action after surgery

There is controversy over how best to treat patients after they've undergone surgery for prostate cancer. Does one wait until the cancer comes back or provide men with additional radiation therapy to prevent cancer recurrence?




Brand-Specific Television Alcohol Ads A Significant Predictor Of Brand Consumption Among Underage Youth

Underage drinkers are three times more likely to drink alcohol brands that advertise on television programs they watch compared to other alcohol brands, providing new and compelling evidence of a strong association between alcohol advertising and youth drinking behavior.

Soy may help women's hearts if they start early

A diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters, finds a new study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society.

Two Easy Ways to Decode Menus

If you've ever ordered the wrong food at a restaurant, don't blame yourself; blame the menu. What you order may have less to do with what you want and more to do with a menu's layout and descriptions.

Underwater Elephants

In the high-tech world of science, researchers sometimes need to get back to basics. UC Santa Barbara's Douglas McCauley did just that to study the impacts of the bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) on coral reef ecosystems at two remote locations in the central Pacific Ocean.

Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes

Finland's love of milk has been traced back to 2500 BC thanks to high-tech techniques to analyse residues preserved in fragments of ancient pots.

Scientists caution against exploitation of deep ocean

The world's oceans are vast and deep, yet rapidly advancing technology and the quest for extracting resources from previously unreachable depths is beginning to put the deep seas on the cusp of peril, an international team of scientists warned this week.

Study: Pediatric preventive care guidelines need retooling for computerized format

With the increasing use of electronic medical records and health information exchange, there is a growing demand for a computerized version of the preventive care guidelines pediatricians use across the United States.

Spin-based electronics: New material successfully tested

Spintronics is an emerging field of electronics, where devices work by manipulating the spin of electrons rather than the current generated by their motion.

Toward a home test for detecting potentially dangerous levels of caffeine

The shocking news of an Ohio teen who died of a caffeine overdose in May highlighted the potential dangers of the normally well-tolerated and mass-consumed substance.

New catalyst converts carbon dioxide to fuel

Scientists from the University of Illinois at Chicago have synthesized a catalyst that improves their system for converting waste carbon dioxide into syngas, a precursor of gasoline and other energy-rich products, bringing the process closer to commercial viability.

Research may explain how foremost anticancer 'guardian' protein learned to switch sides

Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered a new function of the body's most important tumor-suppressing protein. Called p53, this protein has been called "the guardian of the genome."

Short sellers not to blame for 2008 financial crisis, study finds

Contrary to widespread media reports, the collapse of several financial firms during the 2008 economic crisis was not triggered by unsettled stock trades, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.

NASA-funded X-ray Instrument Settles Interstellar Debate

New findings from a NASA-funded instrument have resolved a decades-old puzzle about a fog of low-energy X-rays observed over the entire sky.

Penn Team Makes Cancer Glow to Improve Surgical Outcomes

The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence.

Brainwaves Can Predict Audience Reaction

Media and marketing experts have long sought a reliable method of forecasting responses from the general population to future products and messages.

Research shows impact of soft drinks in meal planning

New research by academics in the University of Bristol's Nutrition and Behaviour Unit (NBU) has looked into whether we take liquid calories into account when planning meals.

Facilitating transparency in spinal cord injury studies using recognized information standards

Progress in developing robust therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI) and peripheral nerve injury has been slow.

Brainwaves can predict audience reaction for television programming

Media and marketing experts have long sought a reliable method of forecasting responses from the general population to future products and messages.

Weighing the Milky Way

Does the Milky Way look fat in this picture? Has Andromeda been taking skinny selfies? It turns out the way some astrophysicists have been studying our galaxy made it appear that the Milky Way might be more massive than it's neighbor down the street, Andromeda.

Ablation increases survival for adults with atrial fibrillation

Adults who undergo a minimally invasive technique to treat atrial fibrillation are significantly less likely to die from a heart attack or heart failure, according to a long-term study by the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center.

Brain response to appetizing food cues varies among obese people

People who have the most common genetic mutation linked to obesity respond differently to pictures of appetizing foods than overweight or obese people who do not have the genetic mutation, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

$15 Billion Annual Public Financing System for Physician Training Needs Overhaul To Meet Nation's Health Care Needs, Says New IOM Report

The U.S. should significantly reform the federal system for financing physician training and residency programs to ensure that the public's $15 billion annual investment is producing the doctors that the nation needs, says a new report by the Institute of Medicine.

Good outcomes with multiple limb salvage after severe combat injuries, reports Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

For survivors of severe combat injuries threatening more than one limb, reconstructive surgical procedures using tissue flaps have a good record of safety and effectiveness in avoiding amputation.

Sugar mimics guide stem cells toward neural fate

Embryonic stem cells can develop into a multitude of cells types. Researchers would like to understand how to channel that development into the specific types of mature cells that make up the organs and other structures of living organisms.

UEA research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems

More accurate tests could be created to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer's or memory problems stemming from head injuries, leading to earlier intervention, according to new findings from the University of East Anglia (UEA).

Major turtle nesting beaches protected in 1 of the UK's far flung overseas territories

But on the remote UK overseas territory of Ascension Island, one of the world's largest green turtle populations is undergoing something of a renaissance.

Tough foam from tiny sheets

Tough, ultralight foam of atom-thick sheets can be made to any size and shape through a chemical process invented at Rice University.

Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean

As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water that is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle of this century.

Team studies the social origins of intelligence in the brain

By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, scientists are tackling -- and beginning to answer -- longstanding questions about how the brain works.

Reducing kidney injury using a quality improvement method

Using quality improvement measures in eight of the 10 hospitals in the Northern New England Cardiovascular Disease Study Group, researchers have found a way to reduce kidney injury in patients undergoing a procedure with contrast dye.

Differential gene expression in proximal and distal nerve segments after sciatic nerve injury

Wallerian degeneration is a subject of major interest in neuroscience. A large number of genes are differentially regulated during the distinct stages of Wallerian degeneration: transcription factor activation, immune response, myelin cell differentiation and dedifferentiation.

Teen insomnia is linked with depression and anxiety

A study of high school students by University of Adelaide psychology researchers has shed new light on the links between insomnia-related mental health conditions among teens.

Optimum inertial design for self-propulsion

Scale plays a major role in locomotion. Swimming microorganisms, such as bacteria and spermatozoa, are subjected to relatively small inertial forces compared to the viscous forces exerted by the surrounding fluid.

Peru's carbon quantified: Economic and conservation boon

Today scientists unveiled the first high-resolution map of the carbon stocks stored on land throughout the entire country of Perú.

Researchers take further steps toward development of a vaccine against tick-transmitted disease

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine researchers have made an important advancement toward developing a vaccine against the debilitating and potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA).

Revolutionary Microshutter Technology Hurdles Significant Challenges

NASA technologists have hurdled a number of significant technological challenges in their quest to improve an already revolutionary observing technology originally created for the James Webb Space Telescope.

Mercury's magnetic field tells scientists how its interior is different from Earth's

Earth and Mercury are both rocky planets with iron cores, but Mercury's interior differs from Earth's in a way that explains why the planet has such a bizarre magnetic field, UCLA planetary physicists and colleagues report.

Older adults are at risk of financial abuse

Nearly one in every twenty elderly American adults is being financially exploited - often by their own family members. This burgeoning public health crisis especially affects poor and black people.

Beware of claims about cosmetic stem cells procedures, says review in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Advertising claims for cosmetic procedures using stem cells are running far ahead of the scientific evidence for safety and effectiveness, according to a review in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Acupuncture improves quality of life for breast cancer patients using aromatase inhibitors

Use of electroacupuncture (EA) - a form of acupuncture where a small electric current is passed between pairs of acupuncture needles - produces significant improvements in fatigue, anxiety and depression in as little as eight weeks for early stage breast cancer patients experiencing joint pain related to the use of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) to treat breast cancer.

Big data confirms climate extremes are here to stay

In a paper published online today in the journal Scientific Reports, published by Nature, Northeastern researchers Evan Kodra and Auroop Ganguly found that while global temperature is indeed increasing, so too is the variability in temperature extremes.

Chinese mosquitos on the Baltic Sea

The analysis of the roughly 3,000 pieces is still in its infant stage. But it is already evident that the results will be of major significance.

Could summer camp be the key to world peace?

According to findings from a new study by University of Chicago Booth School of Business Professor Jane Risen, and Chicago Booth doctoral student Juliana Schroeder, it may at least be a start.

Mysterious molecules in space

Over the vast, empty reaches of interstellar space, countless small molecules tumble quietly though the cold vacuum.

A new way to make microstructured surfaces

A team of researchers has created a new way of manufacturing microstructured surfaces that have novel three-dimensional textures.

Socialization relative strength in fragile X longitudinal study

Standard scores measuring "adaptive behavior" in boys with fragile X syndrome tend to decline during childhood and adolescence, the largest longitudinal study of the inherited disorder to date has found.

Informal Child Care Significantly Impacts Rural Economies, MU Study Finds

The child care industry has grown significantly in recent years, contributing considerably to the national economy through job creation and increased opportunities for parents to work.

Vision-correcting display makes reading glasses so yesterday

What if computer screens had glasses instead of the people staring at the monitors? That concept is not too far afield from technology being developed by UC Berkeley computer and vision scientists.

Brazilian researchers identify RNA that regulates cell death

Researchers from the University of São Paulo (USP) have identified an RNA known as INXS that, although containing no instructions for the production of a protein, modulates the action of an important gene in the process of apoptosis, or programmed cell death.

Implanting 125I seeds into rat DRG for neuropathic pain: Only neuronal microdamage occurs

The use of iodine-125 (125I) in cancer treatment has been shown to relieve patients' pain.

A blood test for suicide?

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that, if confirmed in larger studies, could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person's risk of attempting suicide.

Burdened by blunders with numbers

Between 3 and 6% of schoolchildren suffer from an arithmetic-related learning disability.

Study: Contrary to image, city politicians do adapt to voters

Political scientists have long wondered whether city governments in the U.S. are really responsive to their voters. Aren't local governments simply mired in machine politics, or under the sway of local big-money interests? Does ideology matter?

High frequency of potential entrapment gaps in hospital beds

A survey of beds within a large teaching hospital in Ireland has shown than many of them did not comply with dimensional standards put in place to minimise the risk of entrapment.

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