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Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Thin colorectal cancer patients have shorter survival than obese patients

Although being overweight with a high body-mass index (BMI) has long been associated with a higher risk for colorectal cancer, thinner patients might not fare as well after treatment for advanced cancer, according to a new study from Duke Medicine.




Subcutaneous administration of multispecific antibody improves tumor treatment

As a rule, anti-tumor antibodies are administered to the patients intravenously. This usually takes several hours because otherwise a too rapid activation of the immune system can lead to significant adverse side effects.

New method can make cheaper solar energy storage

Storing solar energy as hydrogen is a promising way for developing comprehensive renewable energy systems.

Lifelong learning is made possible by recycling of histones, study says

Neurons are a limited commodity; each of us goes through life with essentially the same set we had at birth.

New epigenetic mechanism revealed in brain cells

For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb.

Hydroelectric dams drastically reduce tropical forest biodiversity

Widely hailed as 'green' sources of renewable energy, hydroelectric dams have been built worldwide at an unprecedented scale.

Clinical investigation reviews approaches and outcomes of Africa-based HIV trials

A new article in Clinical Investigation highlights the learnings gleaned from monitoring several complex HIV clinical trials in Africa over a 15 year period.

Monitoring seawater reveals ocean acidification risks to Alaskan shellfish hatchery

New collaborative research between NOAA, University of Alaska and an Alaskan shellfish hatchery shows that ocean acidification may make it difficult for Alaskan coastal waters to support shellfish hatcheries by 2040 unless costly mitigation efforts are installed to modify seawater used in the hatcheries.

Experimental drug combined with standard chemo may shrink ovarian cancers

Working in cell cultures and mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that an experimental drug called fostamatinib combined with the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel may overcome ovarian cancer cells' resistance to paclitaxel.

Researcher discovers groundwater modeling breakthrough

A University of Wyoming professor has made a discovery that answers a nearly 100-year-old question about water movement, with implications for agriculture, hydrology, climate science and other fields.

New chronic lung disease guidelines over-diagnose older men and under-diagnose younger women

New guidelines for diagnosing chronic lung disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD), should be modified because they over-diagnose COPD in older men and under-diagnose COPD in young women.

Nanospiked bacteria are the brightest hard X-ray emitters

In a step that overturns traditional assumptions and practice, researchers at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai and Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhi Nagar have fashioned bacteria to emit intense, hard x-ray radiation.

Study: Restaurant meals can be as bad for your waistline as fast food is

When Americans go out to eat, either at a fast-food outlet or a full-service restaurant, they consume, on average, about 200 more calories a day than when they stay home for meals, a new study reports.

Benefits of vitamin B12 supplements for older people questioned

Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people with moderate vitamin B12 deficiency, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Producing fuel from Canada oil sands emits more carbon than from US crude

The production of petroleum from Canada's oil sands is on the rise with much of it destined for U.S. refineries.

New drug for neuroblastoma shows promise in phase I study

Researchers at Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have completed the first clinical trial of a new treatment for children suffering from neuroblastoma.

Consumers understand supplements help fill nutrient gaps, new survey shows

The vast majority of consumers recognize that multivitamins, calcium and/or vitamin D supplements can help fill nutrient gaps but should not be viewed as replacements for a healthy diet, according to a new survey conducted on behalf of the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN).

70 percent of college students stressed about finances

Seven out of 10 college students feel stressed about their personal finances, according to a new national survey.

Effective conversion of methane by a new copper zeolite

A new bio-inspired zeolite catalyst, developed by an international team with researchers from Technische Universit√§t M√ľnchen (TUM), Eindhoven University of Technology and University of Amsterdam, might pave the way to small scale 'gas-to-liquid' technologies converting natural gas to fuels and starting materials for the chemical industry.

What's in your landscape? Plants can alter West Nile virus risk

A new study looks at how leaf litter in water influences the abundance of Culex pipiens mosquitoes, which can transmit West Nile virus to humans, domestic animals, birds and other wildlife.

Elastic gel to heal wounds

A team of bioengineers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), led by Ali Khademhosseini, PhD, and Nasim Annabi, PhD, of the Biomedical Engineering Division, has developed a new protein-based gel that, when exposed to light, mimics many of the properties of elastic tissue, such as skin and blood vessels.

Trends in antipsychotic medication use in children, adolescents, and young adults

Despite concerns that use of antipsychotic medications in treating young people has increased, use actually declined between 2006 and 2010 for children ages 12 and under, and increased for adolescents and young adults.

Why human egg cells don't age well

When egg cells form with an incorrect number of chromosomes--a problem that increases with age--the result is usually a miscarriage or a genetic disease such as Down syndrome.

Implantable 'artificial pancreas' could help diabetes patients control their blood sugar

Living with Type 1 diabetes requires constant monitoring of blood sugar levels and injecting insulin daily. Now scientists are reporting in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research the development of an implantable "artificial pancreas" that continuously measures a person's blood sugar, or glucose, level and can automatically release insulin as needed.

We're not alone -- but the universe may be less crowded than we think

There may be far fewer galaxies further out in the universe then might be expected, according to a new study led by Michigan State University.

Longer-term follow-up shows greater type 2 diabetes remission for bariatric surgery compared to life

Among obese participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus, bariatric surgery with 2 years of a low-level lifestyle intervention resulted in more disease remission than did lifestyle intervention alone, according to a study published online by JAMA Surgery.

Revised view of brain circuit reveals how we avoid being overwhelmed by powerful odors

You've just encountered a frightened skunk, which has sprayed a generous quantity of its sulfur-containing scent directly in your path.

Extreme heat and precipitation are increasing Salmonella infections, UMD study shows

Extreme heat and precipitation events, which are expected to increase in frequency and intensity due to climate change, are associated with increased risk of Salmonella infections, according to a study led by researchers from the University of Maryland School of Public Health.

Creating a stopwatch for volcanic eruptions

We've long known that beneath the scenic landscapes of Yellowstone National Park sleeps a supervolcano with a giant chamber of hot, partly molten rock below it.

Intrusiveness of old emotional memories can be reduced by computer game play procedure

Unwanted, intrusive visual memories are a core feature of stress- and trauma-related clinical disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but they can also crop up in everyday life.

Europe, Siberia and in between: Caucasian populations of non-biting midges

A research in the North Caucasus, conducted by a group of Russian scientists over three years, has revealed an intermediate distribution of Caucasian populations of non-biting midges between Europe and Siberia.

One in 4 people prescribed opioids progressed to longer-term prescriptions

Opioid painkiller addiction and accidental overdoses have become far too common across the United States.

Rosetta spacecraft sees sinkholes on comet

The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft first began orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014.

Men with 'low testosterone' have higher rates of depression

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW), led by Michael S. Irwig, M.D., found that men referred for tertiary care for borderline testosterone levels had much higher rates of depression and depressive symptoms than those of the general population.

Preemies at high risk of autism don't show typical signs of disorder in early infancy

Premature babies are at an increased risk for developing autism spectrum disorder.

Treatment reduces symptoms in syndrome that causes extreme light sensitivity

A novel synthetic hormone that makes certain skin cells produce more melanin significantly increases pain-free sun exposure in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare, genetic disorder resulting in excruciating pain within minutes of sun exposure.

In blinding eye disease, trash-collecting cells go awry, accelerate damage

Spider-like cells inside the brain, spinal cord and eye hunt for invaders, capturing and then devouring them.

Research reveals how the human brain might reconstruct past events

When remembering something from our past, we often vividly re-experience the whole episode in which it occurred. New UCL research funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust has now revealed how this might happen in the brain.

Observing the birth of a planet

Observing time at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) on Paranal Mountain is a very precious commodity - and yet the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile spent an entire night with a high-resolution infrared camera pointed at a single object in the night sky.

How cortisol reinforces traumatic memories

The stress hormone cortisol strengthens memories of scary experiences. However, it is effective not only while the memory is being formed for the first time, but also later when people look back at an experience while the memory reconsolidates.

Income-tax earnings data gives more accurate picture of value of college degree

A new study that is the first to use Social Security Administration's personal income tax data tracking the same individuals over 20 years to measure individual lifetime earnings has confirmed significant long-term economic benefits of college education.

Study details use of antipsychotic medication in young people

The use of antipsychotic medication increased among adolescents and young adults from 2006 to 2010 but not among children 12 years or younger, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry.

Warts and all: How St. John's Wort can make you sick

St John's Wort can produce the same adverse reactions as antidepressants, and serious side effects can occur when the two are taken together, according to new University of Adelaide research.

Producing spin-entangled electrons

A team from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, along with collaborators from several Japanese institutions, have successfully produced pairs of spin-entangled electrons and demonstrated, for the first time, that these electrons remain entangled even when they are separated from one another on a chip.

Traffic-related air pollution risk is greater for minority and low-income populations

Low-income and minority populations disproportionately reside near roadways with high traffic volumes and consequently face increased exposure to traffic-related air pollutants (TRAP) and their associated health effects.

Should scientists be allowed to genetically alter human embryos?

Scientists have at their disposal a way to explore the possible prevention of genetic diseases before birth. But should they?

Study of gene mutations in aplastic anemia may help optimize treament

Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition.

The bizarre mating habits of flatworms

Failing to find a mating partner is a dent to the reproductive prospects of any animal, but in the flatworm species Macrostomum hystrix it might involve a real headache.

Doing good deeds helps socially anxious people relax

Being busy with acts of kindness can help people who suffer from social anxiety to mingle more easily. This is the opinion of Canadian researchers Jennifer Trew of Simon Fraser University and Lynn Alden of the University of British Columbia, in a study published in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion.

Brain activity predicts promiscuity and problem drinking

A pair of brain-imaging studies suggest researchers may be able to predict how likely young adults are to develop problem drinking or engage in risky sexual behavior in response to stress.

The clock is ticking: New method reveals exact time of death after 10 days

A new method for calculating the exact time of death, even after as much as 10 days, has been developed by a group of researchers at the University of Salzburg.

Sleep deprivation could reduce intrusive memories of traumatic scenes

A good night's sleep has long been recommended to those who have experienced a traumatic event. But an Oxford University-led study provides preliminary experimental work suggesting it could actually be the wrong thing to do.

Baby seals that practice in pools make better divers

Being able to dive is what matters most for seal pups, but how do they learn to do it?

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