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Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

ADHD Drug May Help Preserve Our Self-Control Resources

Methylphenidate, also known as Ritalin, may prevent the depletion of self-control, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.




Brain size matters when it comes to animal self-control

Chimpanzees may throw tantrums like toddlers, but their total brain size suggests they have more self-control than, say, a gerbil or fox squirrel, according to a new study of 36 species of mammals and birds ranging from orangutans to zebra finches.

Newly-Approved Brain Stimulator Offers Hope for Individuals With Uncontrolled Epilepsy

A recently FDA-approved device has been shown to reduce seizures in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy by as much as 50 percent.

In lab tests, the antimicrobial ingredient triclosan spurs growth of breast cancer cells

Some manufacturers are turning away from using triclosan as an antimicrobial ingredient in soaps, toothpastes and other products over health concerns.

Diagnosed at Last: Phevor Software IDs Disease-Causing Gene Mutations in 3 Children

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics.

Loss of memory in Alzheimer's mice models reversed through gene therapy

Alzheimer's disease is the first cause of dementia and affects some 400,000 people in Spain alone.

NREL Unlocking Secrets of New Solar Material

A new solar material that has the same crystal structure as a mineral first found in the Ural Mountains in 1839 is shooting up the efficiency charts faster than almost anything researchers have seen before-and it is generating optimism that a less expensive way of using sunlight to generate electricity may be in our planet's future.

Non-uniform genetic mutations identified in lung cancers could lead to targeted treatment

The research, published in the journal Oncotarget, explored tumour heterogeneity - where different cells have different appearances or their own DNA signatures within the same cancer. Such differences could make it difficult to design effective, targeted treatment strategies.

Is nuclear power the only way to avoid geoengineering?

To avoid the need for geoengineering, which could have enormous unforeseen consequences, the international community should pursue increased deployment of nuclear power plants, which do not emit carbon dioxide, to address the climate crisis.

Impact of whooping cough vaccination revealed

The most comprehensive study to date of the family of bacteria that causes whooping cough points to more effective vaccine strategies and reveals surprising findings about the bacteria's origin and evolution.

How to avoid water wars between 'fracking' industry and residents

The shale gas boom has transformed the energy landscape in the U.S., but in some drier locations, it could cause conflict among the energy industry, residents and agricultural interests over already-scarce water resources, say researchers.

Functional electrical stimulation improves neuronal regeneration after cerebral infarction

Previous studies have shown that proliferation of endogenous neural precursor cells cannot alone compensate for the damage to neurons and axons.

Scripps Florida Scientists Identify Critical New Protein Complex Involved in Learning and Memory

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a protein complex that plays a critical but previously unknown role in learning and memory formation.

Neuroimaging: Live from inside the cell

A novel imaging technique provides insights into the role of redox signaling and reactive oxygen species in living neurons, in real time.

Study suggests that so-called "female intuition" could be linked to lower exposure to testosterone in women while in womb

So-called "female intuition" could actually have a biological component, related to the lower prenatal exposure to testosterone women receive in the womb.

Depressed? Researchers identify new anti-depressant mechanisms, therapeutic approaches

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression.

Scientists pinpoint protein that could improve small cell lung cancer therapies

Approximately 15 percent of all lung cancers are small cell lung cancers (SCLC), which grow rapidly and often develop resistance to chemotherapy.

Scientists identify cancer specific cell for potential treatment of gastric cancer

A team of scientists led by a researcher from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore has identified the cancer specific stem cell which causes gastric cancer.

Remote Surveillance May Increase Chance of Survival for 'Uncontacted' Tribes, MU Study Finds

Lowland South America, including the Amazon Basin, harbors most of the last indigenous societies that have limited contact with the outside world.

Mantis Shrimp Stronger than Airplanes

Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis shrimp, a team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside, in collaboration with University of Southern California and Purdue University, have developed a design structure for composite materials that is more impact resistant and tougher than the standard used in airplanes.

Physical activity keeps hippocampus healthy in people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

A study of older adults at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease shows that moderate physical activity may protect brain health and stave off shrinkage of the hippocampus- the brain region responsible for memory and spatial orientation that is attacked first in Alzheimer's disease.

Berkeley Lab Researchers Demonstrate First Size-based Chromatography Technique for the Study of Living Cells

Using nanodot technology, Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated the first size-based form of chromatography that can be used to study the membranes of living cells.

Wildlife response to climate change is likely underestimated, experts warn

Analyzing thousands of breeding bird surveys sent in by citizen scientists across the western United States and Canada over 35 years, wildlife researchers report that most of the 40 songbird species they studied shifted either northward or toward higher elevation in response to climate change, but did not necessarily do both.

Steering chemical reactions with laser pulses

Usually, chemical reactions just take their course, much like a ball rolling downhill. However, it is also possible to deliberately control chemical reactions: at the Vienna University of Technology, molecules are hit with femtosecond laser pulses, changing the distribution of electrons in the molecule.

Scientists alter fat metabolism in animals to prevent most common type of heart disease

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans.

Midlife occupational and leisure-time physical activity limits mobility in old age

Strenuous occupational physical activity in midlife increases the risk of mobility limitation in old age, whereas leisure-time physical activity decreases the risk.

Nanoreporters tell 'sour' oil from 'sweet'

Scientists at Rice University have created a nanoscale detector that checks for and reports on the presence of hydrogen sulfide in crude oil and natural gas while they're still in the ground.

Toward unraveling the Alzheimer's mystery

Getting to the bottom of Alzheimer's disease has been a rapidly evolving pursuit with many twists, turns and controversies.

Physicists consider implications of recent revelations about the universe's first light

Last month, scientists announced the first hard evidence for cosmic inflation, the process by which the infant universe swelled from microscopic to cosmic size in an instant. This almost unimaginably fast expansion was first theorized more than three decades ago, yet only now has "smoking gun" proof emerged.

Life Stressors Trigger Neurological Disorders, Researchers Find

When mothers are exposed to trauma, illness, alcohol or other drug abuse, these stressors may activate a single molecular trigger in brain cells that can go awry and activate conditions such as schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder and some forms of autism.

Picture books aren't just fun: Moms are exposing toddlers to rich information about animals

Children hear as much sophisticated information about animals when parents read picture book stories about animals as when they read flashcard-type animal vocabulary books, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo.

Chemical companies shore up supplement science

As evidence mounts showing the potential health benefits of probiotics, antioxidants and other nutritional compounds, more and more people are taking supplements.

New Research Focuses on Streamwater Chemistry, Landscape Variation

Winsor Lowe, interim director of the University of Montana's Wildlife Biology Program, co-wrote a research paper published April 21 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on how streamwater chemistry varies across a headwater stream network.

Ravens understand the relations among others

Like many social mammals, ravens form different types of social relationships - they may be friends, kin, or partners and they also form strict dominance relations.

Fiction prepares us for a world changed by global warming

Climate fiction, or simply cli-fi, is a newly coined term for novels and films which focus on the consequences of global warming.

Community-based weight loss program aids diabetes management

Weight loss and control of blood sugar can reduce the risk of complications in patients with diabetes but this is difficult for many to achieve.

Liquid spacetime

What if spacetime were a kind of fluid? This is the question tackled by theoretical physicists working on quantum gravity by creating models attempting to reconcile gravity and quantum mechanics.

Neurotics Don't Just Avoid Action: They Dislike it

That person we all seem to know who we say is neurotic and unable to take action? Turns out he or she isn't unable to act but simply doesn't want to.

How Australia got the hump with 1 million feral camels

A new study by a University of Exeter researcher has shed light on how an estimated one million-strong population of wild camels thriving in Australia's remote outback have become reviled as pests and culled on a large scale.

Genetics risk, prenatal smoking may predict behavioral problems

Researchers have found evidence of an interaction between prenatal smoking and genetic risk factors that increase aggressive behavior in children, especially in girls.

RI Hospital physician: Legalizing medical marijuana doesn't increase use among adolescents

Parents and physicians concerned about an increase in adolescents' marijuana use following the legalization of medical marijuana can breathe a sigh of relief.

Speed-Reading Apps May Impair Reading Comprehension by Limiting Ability to Backtrack

To address the fact that many of us are on the go and pressed for time, app developers have devised speed-reading software that eliminates the time we supposedly waste by moving our eyes as we read.

Male health linked to testosterone exposure in womb, study finds

Men's susceptibility to serious health conditions may be influenced by low exposure to testosterone in the womb, new research suggests.

New patenting guidelines are needed for biotechnology

Biotechnology scientists must be aware of the broad patent landscape and push for new patent and licensing guidelines, according to a new paper from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Gym Culture Likened to McDonalds

Visit a typical gym and you will encounter a highly standardised notion of what the human body should look like and how much it should weigh.

Two genes linked to inflammatory bowel disease

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), a group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the intestine that result in painful and debilitating complications, affects over 1.4 million people in the U.S., and while there are treatments to reduce inflammation for patients, there is no cure.

Bioinformatics profiling identifies a new mammalian clock gene

Over the last few decades researchers have characterized a set of clock genes that drive daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in all types of species, from flies to humans.

Risk of pregnancy greater with newer method of female sterilization

The risk of pregnancy among women using a newer method of planned sterilization called hysteroscopic sterilization is more than 10 times greater over a 10-year period than using the more commonly performed laparoscopic sterilization, a study by researchers at Yale University and UC Davis has found.

Report recommends insurers use prescription monitoring data to reduce opioid abuse, deaths

The Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Center of Excellence at Brandeis University has issued a ground-breaking report recommending that medical insurers use prescription monitoring data to reduce the overdoses, deaths and health care costs associated with abuse of opioids and other prescription drugs.

Clinics not bogged down by red tape can ease health cost burdens

Health clinics that can provide primary care for low-income patients may ease the financial burden on both hospitals and insurance companies while improving patient health, researchers have concluded.

Researchers compare hip width and sexual behavior

In a new study, women who were more inclined to have one-night stands had wider hips, reveals Colin A. Hendrie of the University of Leeds in the UK. He is the lead author of a study into how a woman's build influences her sexual behavior, published in Springer's journal Archives of Sexual Behavior.

Researchers identify link between fetal growth and risk of stillbirth

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch and the Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network have identified a link between stillbirth and either restricted or excessive fetal growth.

New study finds 2.5 million basketball injuries to high school athletes in 6 seasons

Basketball is a popular high school sport in the United States with 1 million participants annually.

Online Retailers Have Clear Advantage by Not Collecting Sales Tax

Two independent studies use two very different approaches to reach the same conclusion: some online retailers really do have an advantage over traditional brick-and-mortar stores.

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