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Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun

Imagine a smog-free Los Angeles, where electric cars ply silent freeways, solar panels blanket rooftops and power plants run on heat from beneath the earth, from howling winds and from the blazing desert sun.




Immune response may cause harm in brain injuries, disorders

Could the body's own immune system play a role in memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction associated with conditions like chronic epilepsy, Alzheimer's dementia and concussions? Cleveland Clinic researchers believe so, based on a study published online by PLOS ONE.

Smartphone experiment tracks whether our life story is written in our gut bacteria

Life events such as visiting another country or contracting a disease cause a significant shift in the make-up of the gut microbiota - the community of bacteria living in the digestive system, according to research published in the open access journal Genome Biology.

Stanford biologist warns of early stages of Earth's 6th mass extinction event

The planet's current biodiversity, the product of 3.5 billion years of evolutionary trial and error, is the highest in the history of life. But it may be reaching a tipping point.

Less than 1 percent of UK public research funding spent on antibiotic research in past 5 years

Less than 1% of research funding awarded by public and charitable bodies to UK researchers in 2008 was awarded for research on antibiotics, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Wireless home automation systems reveal more than you would think about user behavior

Home automation systems that control domestic lighting, heating, window blinds or door locks offer opportunities for third parties to intrude on the privacy of the inhabitants and gain considerable insight into their behavioral patterns.

Piggy-backing cells hold clue to skin cancer growth

Skin Cancer cells work together to spread further and faster, according to a new study published in Cell Reports. The discovery could lead to new drugs to tackle melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer.

New research suggests Saharan dust is key to the formation of Bahamas' Great Bank

A new study suggests that Saharan dust played a major role in the formation of the Bahamas islands. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science showed that iron-rich Saharan dust provides the nutrients necessary for specialized bacteria to produce the island chain's carbonate-based foundation.

Increased risk for head, neck cancers in patients with diabetes

Diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to increase the risk for head and neck cancer (HNC).

A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain's memory center

Neuroscientists in Bonn and Heidelberg have succeeded in providing new insights into how the brain works. Researchers at the DZNE and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) analyzed tissue samples from mice to identify how two specific proteins, 'CKAMP44' and 'TARP Gamma-8', act upon the brain's memory center.

Metastatic Brain Tumor Treatment Could Be on the Horizon With SapC-DOPS Use

Over half of patients being seen in the clinic for a diagnosed brain tumor have metastatic cancer, which has no treatment and detrimental outcomes in most cases.

Link between ritual circumcision procedure and herpes infection in infants examined

A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society found.

Total darkness at night is key to success of breast cancer therapy -- Tulane study

Exposure to light at night, which shuts off nighttime production of the hormone melatonin, renders breast cancer completely resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used breast cancer drug, says a new study by Tulane University School of Medicine cancer researchers.

Farmers market vouchers may boost produce consumption in low-income families

Vouchers to buy fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers markets increase the amount of produce in the diets of some families on food assistance, according to research led by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

UPMC-Developed Test Increases Odds of Correct Surgery for Thyroid Cancer Patients

The routine use of a molecular testing panel developed at UPMC greatly increases the likelihood of performing the correct initial surgery for patients with thyroid nodules and cancer, report researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with UPMC CancerCenter.

BU researchers discover that Klotho is neuroprotective against Alzheimer's disease

Boston University School of Medicine researchers may have found a way to delay or even prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Brain's dynamic duel underlies win-win choices

People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University.

Informed consent: False positives not a worry in lung cancer study

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended computerized tomography (CT) lung screening for people at high risk for cancer, but a potential problem with CT is that many patients will have positive results on the screening test, only to be deemed cancer-free on further testing.

A world first: Researchers identify a treatment that prevents tumor metastasis

Metastasis, the strategy adopted by tumor cells to transform into an aggressive form of cancer, are often associated with a gloomy prognosis.

Early warning sign for babies at risk of autism

Some babies are at risk for autism because they have an older sibling that has the disorder.

Cultural Stereotypes May Evolve From Sharing Social Information

Millenials are narcissistic, scientists are geeky, and men like sports - or so cultural stereotypes would have us believe.

Incisionless Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery Associated with Shorter Hospital Stays

New research from Penn Medicine shows that incisionless transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30 percent and has no impact on post-operative vascular complication rates when compared with conventional transfemoral TAVR, which requires an incision in the groin.

Study indicates large raptors in Africa used for bushmeat

Bushmeat, the use of native animal species for food or commercial food sale, has been heavily documented to be a significant factor in the decline of many species of primates and other mammals.

Monitoring the rise and fall of the microbiome

Trillions of bacteria live in each person's digestive tract. Scientists believe that some of these bacteria help digest food and stave off harmful infections, but their role in human health is not well understood.

New radiological signs of gastric lap band slippage identified

Researchers in Ohio and Rhode Island have identified two previously undescribed radiological signs of potentially life-threatening slippage of laparoscopically adjustable gastric bands.

'Experiential products' provide same happiness boost as experiences, study finds

Material items designed to create or enhance an experience, also known as "experiential products," can make shoppers just as happy as life experiences, according to new research from San Francisco State University.

Could age of first period influence development of diseases in older women?

A novel study shows that the age girls reach puberty is influenced by 'imprinted genes'-a subset of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent contributes the gene.

Experiences at every stage of life contribute to cognitive abilities in old age

Early life experiences, such as childhood socioeconomic status and literacy, may have greater influence on the risk of cognitive impairment late in life than such demographic characteristics as race and ethnicity, a large study by researchers with the UC Davis Alzheimer's Disease Center and the University of Victoria, Canada, has found.

Leaf-mining insects destroyed with the dinosaurs, others quickly appeared

After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs' extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared.

Atomic structure of key muscle component revealed in Penn study

Actin is the most abundant protein in the body, and when you look more closely at its fundamental role in life, it's easy to see why.

New imaging agent provides better picture of the gut

A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

Exposure to dim light at night may make breast cancers resistant to tamoxifen

For rats bearing human breast tumors, exposure to dim light at night made the tumors resistant to the breast cancer drug tamoxifen, according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Is Europe putting cancer research at risk?

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), the leading pan-European association representing medical oncology professionals, has expressed concern that the proposed EU General Data Protection Regulation could make cancer research impossible and add a significant burden to both doctors and cancer patients.

Shift work linked to heightened risk of type 2 diabetes

Shift work is linked to a heightened risk of developing type 2 diabetes, with the risk seemingly greatest among men and those working rotating shift patterns, indicates an analysis of the available evidence published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles

Invertebrate numbers have decreased by 45% on average over a 35 year period in which the human population doubled, reports a study on the impact of humans on declining animal numbers.

Study gives new perspective on agricultural plastic, debris burning, and air quality

To reduce fire hazard in the United States, wildland managers often utilize the silvicultural practice of mechanically cutting woody shrubs and suppressed trees (ladder fuels).

Researchers discover new way to determine cancer risk of chemicals

A new study has shown that it is possible to predict long-term cancer risk from a chemical exposure by measuring the short-term effects of that same exposure.

ORNL study reveals new characteristics of complex oxide surfaces

A novel combination of microscopy and data processing has given researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory an unprecedented look at the surface of a material known for its unusual physical and electrochemical properties.

Background TV can be bad for kids

Parents, turn off the television when your children are with you. And when you do let them watch, make sure the programs stimulate their interest in learning.

TGen-led study seeks to understand why some HIV-positive men are more infectious than others

A new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) provides insights into the interplay among bacteria, viruses and the immune system during HIV infection.

Antioxidant Biomaterial Promotes Healing

When a foreign material like a medical device or surgical implant is put inside the human body, the body always responds.

Overweight and obese preschoolers lose more weight and keep it off when parent is also treated

Primary care treatment of overweight and obese preschoolers works better when treatment targets both parent and child compared to when only the child is targeted, according to research published this week in Pediatrics and conducted at the University at Buffalo and Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo.

Four billion-year-old chemistry in cells today

Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today according to scientists at the University of East Anglia.

Insecticides Similar to Nicotine Widespread in Midwest

Insecticides similar to nicotine, known as neonicotinoids, were found commonly in streams throughout the Midwest, according to a new USGS study. This is the first broad-scale investigation of neonicotinoid insecticides in the Midwestern United States and one of the first conducted within the United States.

Neurologic recovery from corticospinal tract injury due to subfalcine herniation

After development of diffusion tensor tractography (DTT), which is derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), three-dimensional reconstruction and estimation for three motor tracts, such as the corticospinal tract, the rubrospinal tract, and the corticoreticular pathway became possible.

Heart attack patients could be treated more quickly after Manchester research

Clinical judgement, combined with an electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood test on arrival, is effective in reducing unnecessary hospital admissions for chest pain, a new study shows.

Miriam Hospital physician advocates awareness, collaboration to combat peaking hep C virus

Lynn E. Taylor, M.D., director of The Miriam Hospital's HIV/Viral Hepatitis Coinfection program, states in the July, 2014 Rhode Island Medical Journal special edition, "RI Defeats Hep C" that eliminating hepatitis c virus infection (hep c or HCV) is feasible, can provide economic benefits, enhance capacity to address other health challenges, and improve health care disparities.

Noise pollution impacts fish species differently

Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the Universities of Bristol and Exeter which tested fish anti-predator behaviour.

New study draws links between wildlife loss and social conflicts

Citing many sobering examples of how wildlife loss leads to conflict among people around the world, a new article co-authored by Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) Health & Ecosystems: Analysis of Linkages (HEAL) Program Director Dr. Christopher Golden, calls for an interdisciplinary approach to tackle global biodiversity decline.

Brain tumor causes and risk factors elude scientists

Today, nearly 700,000 people in the U.S. are living with a brain tumor, and yet, when it comes to pinpointing causes or risk factors, scientists are still searching for answers.

Seeing the same GP at every visit will reduce emergency department attendance

Attendances at emergency departments can be reduced by enabling patients to see the same GP every time they visit their doctor's surgery. This is just one of several recommendations made in a report published today, led by researchers at the University of Bristol.

Why do men prefer nice women?

People's emotional reactions and desires in initial romantic encounters determine the fate of a potential relationship.

New mass map of a distant galaxy cluster is the most precise yet

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have mapped the mass within a galaxy cluster more precisely than ever before.

A tiny new species of frog from Brazil with a heroic name

The Atlantic Forest is a hotspot of biodiversity and one of the most species richness biome of anurans (frogs, tree-frogs, and toads) in the world.

NYSCF scientists one step closer to cell therapy for multiple sclerosis patients

Scientists at The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute are one step closer to creating a viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis from a patient's own cells.

Narcissistic CEOs and financial performance

Narcissism, considered by some as the "dark side of the executive personality," may actually be a good thing when it comes to certain financial measures, with companies led by narcissistic CEOs outperforming those helmed by non-narcissistic executives, according to recent research co-authored by faculty at the USC Marshall School of Business.

Earlier Stone Age artifacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa

Excavations at an archaeological site at Kathu in the Northern Cape province of South Africa have produced tens of thousands of Earlier Stone Age artifacts, including hand axes and other tools.

Natural products from plants protect skin during cancer radiotherapy

Radiotherapy for cancer involves exposing the patient or their tumor more directly to ionizing radiation, such as gamma rays or X-rays.

8.2 percent of our DNA is 'functional'

Only 8.2% of human DNA is likely to be doing something important - is 'functional' - say Oxford University researchers.

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn't happen, according to a new study from the University of Georgia, these "surprised losers" often have less trust in government and democracy.

Creating sustainable STEM teacher preparation programs

A new study has identified two factors that characterize sustainable university and college programs designed to increase the production of highly qualified physics teachers.

NRG1 isoforms could be an effective therapeutic candidate to promote peripheral nerve regeneration

Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a pleiotropic factor characterized by the existence of numerous isoforms arising from alternative splicing of exons that confer to the protein deeply different characteristics.

The microbes make the sake brewery

A sake brewery has its own microbial terroir, meaning the microbial populations found on surfaces in the facility resemble those found in the product, creating the final flavor according to research published ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

Rutgers Study Explores Attitudes and Preferences Toward Post-Sandy Rebuilding

A yearlong study funded by the New Jersey Recovery Fund and conducted by researchers at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University has found that individual property owners in Sandy-affected towns are skeptical about the likelihood of community-based rebuilding solutions.

Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident Underscores Need to Actively Seek Out and Act on New Information About Nuclear Plant Hazards, Says New NAS Report

A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academy of Sciences concludes that the overarching lesson learned from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is that nuclear plant licensees and their regulators must actively seek out and act on new information about hazards with the potential to affect the safety of nuclear plants.

Parched West is using up underground water, UCI, NASA find

A new study by University of California, Irvine and NASA scientists finds more than 75 percent of the water loss in the drought-stricken Colorado River Basin since late 2004 came from underground resources.

Organic zeolites

Yushan Yan, Distinguished Professor of Engineering at the University of Delaware, is known worldwide for using nanomaterials to solve problems in energy engineering, environmental sustainability and electronics.

Synchronization of North Atlantic, North Pacific preceded abrupt warming, end of ice age

Scientists have long been concerned that global warming may push Earth's climate system across a "tipping point," where rapid melting of ice and further warming may become irreversible -- a hotly debated scenario with an unclear picture of what this point of no return may look like.

New hope for powdery mildew resistant barley

New research at the University of Adelaide has opened the way for the development of new lines of barley with resistance to powdery mildew.

Breakthrough laser experiment reveals liquid-like motion of atoms in an ultra-cold cluster

A new study by researchers from the University of Leicester has furthered our understanding of how tiny nanosystems function, unlocking the potential to create new materials using nanosized 'building blocks'.

New Research: When it hurts to think we were made for each other.

Aristotle said, "Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies." Poetic as it is, thinking that you and your partner were made in heaven for each other can hurt your relationship, says a new study.

CDC reports annual financial cost of COPD to be $36 billion in the United States

The American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) announced today the Online First publication of Total and State-Specific Medical and Absenteeism Costs of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years in the United States for 2010 and Projections Through 2020 in the journal CHEST.

Continuous antibiotics not necessary for many children with common prenatal abnormality

Up to 5 percent of all prenatal ultrasounds uncover antenatal hydronephrosis, or enlarged kidneys, the most commonly detected prenatal abnormality in the United States.

Artificial intelligence identifies the musical progression of the Beatles

Music fans and critics know that the music of the Beatles underwent a dramatic transformation in just a few years, but until now there hasn't been a scientific way to measure the progression.

Bacteria manipulate salt to build shelters to hibernate

For the first time, Spanish researchers have detected an unknown interaction between microorganisms and salt. When Escherichia coli cells are introduced into a droplet of salt water and is left to dry, bacteria manipulate the sodium chloride crystallisation to create biomineralogical biosaline 3D morphologically complex formations, where they hibernate.

New Approach to Form Non-Equilibrium Structures

Although most natural and synthetic processes prefer to settle into equilibrium-a state of unchanging balance without potential or energy-it is within the realm of non-equilibrium conditions where new possibilities lie.

Hubble Finds Three Surprisingly Dry Exoplanets

Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have gone looking for water vapor in the atmospheres of three planets orbiting stars similar to the sun -- and have come up nearly dry.

Incomplete HPV vaccination may offer some protection

Minority women who received the Human Papillomavirus Vaccination (HPV) even after becoming sexually active had lower rates of abnormal Pap test results than those who were never vaccinated. These findings appear in the journal Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

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