Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 
Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Deep-Earth Carbon Offers Clues About Origin of Life on Earth

New findings by a Johns Hopkins University-led team reveal long unknown details about carbon deep beneath the Earth's surface and suggest ways this subterranean carbon might have influenced the history of life on the planet.




Penn researchers unwind the mysteries of the cellular clock

Human existence is basically circadian. Most of us wake in the morning, sleep in the evening, and eat in between. Body temperature, metabolism, and hormone levels all fluctuate throughout the day, and it is increasingly clear that disruption of those cycles can lead to metabolic disease.

New study reveals why some people may be immune to HIV-1

Doctors have long been mystified as to why HIV-1 rapidly sickens some individuals, while in others the virus has difficulties gaining a foothold.

Pluripotent cells created by nuclear transfer can prompt immune reaction, researchers find

Mouse cells and tissues created through nuclear transfer can be rejected by the body because of a previously unknown immune response to the cell's mitochondria, according to a study in mice by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and colleagues in Germany, England and at MIT.

Contact lens discomfort linked to changes in lipid layer of tear film

Changes in the lipid layer of the eyes' natural tear film may contribute to the common problem of contact lens discomfort, reports a study in the December issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry.

Antiangiogenic treatment improves survival in animal model of ovarian cancer

Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal cancer of the female reproductive organs, with more than 200,000 new cases and more than 125,000 deaths each year worldwide.

Dizzying heights: Prehistoric farming on the 'roof of the world'

Animal teeth, bones and plant remains have helped researchers from Cambridge, China and America to pinpoint a date for what could be the earliest sustained human habitation at high altitude.

Breakthrough in managing yellow fever disease

Yellow fever is a disease that can result in symptoms ranging from fever to severe liver damage.

Laser from a plane discovers Roman goldmines in Spain

Las Médulas in León is considered to be the largest opencast goldmine of the Roman Empire, but the search for this metal extended many kilometres further south-east to the Erica river valley.

A CNIO team discovers that a derivative of vitamin B3 prevents liver cancer in mice

Liver cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world, and with the worst prognosis; according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), in 2012, 745,000 deaths were registered worldwide due to this cause, a figure only surpassed by lung cancer.

Tapeworms on the brain expand our knowledge of their genome

A genome of a rare species of tapeworm found living inside a patient's brain has been sequenced for the first time, in research published in the open access journal Genome Biology.

Panel-based genetic diagnostic testing for inherited eye disease proves highly accurate

Investigators at Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School Department of Ophthalmology and colleagues reported the development and characterization of a comprehensive genetic test for inherited eye disorders in the online version of the Nature journal Genetics In Medicine today.

The American athletics track is still a man's world

The limited coverage that American female athletes get in the media is one of many subtle forms of gender biases they have to cope with.

Caltech geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet

A team of researchers from Caltech and the China Earthquake Administration has discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet, north of the eastern end of the Himalayas.

Economic burden of prediabetes up 74 percent over five years

The economic burden of diabetes in America continues to climb, exceeding more than $322 billion in excess medical costs and lost productivity in 2012, or more than $1,000 for every American.

It's filamentary: How galaxies evolve in the cosmic web

How do galaxies like our Milky Way form, and just how do they evolve? Are galaxies affected by their surrounding environment? An international team of researchers, led by astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, proposes some answers.

Evolution: The genetic connivances of digits and genitals

During the development of mammals, the growth and organization of digits are orchestrated by Hox genes, which are activated very early in precise regions of the embryo.

Don't get hacked! New study shows people ignore online warnings

Say you ignored one of those "this website is not trusted" warnings and it led to your computer being hacked. How would you react?

Moffitt Cancer Center Researchers Use Evolutionary Principles to Model Cancer Mutations, Discover Potential Therapeutic Targets

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are taking a unique approach to understanding and investigating cancer by utilizing evolutionary principles and computational modeling to examine the role of specific genetic mutations in the Darwinian struggle among tumor and normal cells during cancer growth.

Study: Obesity fuels silent heart damage

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road.

Time-lapse photos and synched weather data unlock Antarctic secrets

Brown researchers use remote data-gathering equipment to study long-term meteorological and geological forces at work in Antarctica. Time-lapse photography synched with weather data also helps understand natural forces on the surface of Mars.

Mass. General-developed system reveals how our brains and bodies change as we fall asleep

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques.

New study: Aggressive conifer removal benefits Sierra aspen

A study just published by Point Blue Conservation Science shows the benefits of an aggressive approach to restoring Sierra Nevada aspen stands (Populus tremuloides).

Exercise regimens offer little benefit for 1 in 5 people with type 2 diabetes

As many as one in five people with Type 2 diabetes do not see any improvement in blood sugar management when they engage in a supervised exercise regimen, according to a new scientific review published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Largest-ever map of the human interactome predicts new cancer genes

Scientists have created the largest-scale map to date of direct interactions between proteins encoded by the human genome and newly predicted dozens of genes to be involved in cancer.

Pain, magnet displacement in MRI in patients with cochlear implants

Pain, discomfort and magnet displacement were documented in a small medical records review study of patients with cochlear implants (CIs) who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), according to a report published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

Hand dryers can spread bacteria in public toilets, research finds

Modern hand dryers are much worse than paper towels when it comes to spreading germs, according to new University of Leeds research.

When vaccines are imperfect

The control of certain childhood diseases is difficult, despite high vaccination coverage in many countries.

New survey of employers about the health insurance market

A new nationally representative survey of employers--the largest purchasers of health care in the country-- shows that most are unfamiliar with objective metrics of health plan quality information.

Imagination, reality flow in opposite directions in the brain

As real as that daydream may seem, its path through your brain runs opposite reality.

Out of danger: A neural basis for avoiding threats

Researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have identified a key neuronal pathway that makes learning to avoid unpleasant situations possible. Published online in the November 20 issue of Neuron, the work shows that avoidance learning requires neural activity in the habenula representing changes in future expectations.

Salk scientists unveil powerful method to speed cancer drug discovery

For decades, researchers have struggled to translate basic scientific discoveries about cancer into therapeutics that effectively--and with minimal side effects--shrink a tumor.

Brain-dwelling worm in UK man's head sequenced

For the first time, the genome of a rarely seen tapeworm has been sequenced. The genetic information of this invasive parasite, which lived for four years in a UK resident's brain, offers new opportunities to diagnose and treat this invasive parasite.

Caffeine counters cocaine's effects on women's estrus cycles

Women are more sensitive to the effects of cocaine and more susceptible to cocaine abuse than men.

Biomarker could provide early warning of kidney disease in cats

Researchers from Oregon State University and other institutions have developed a new biomarker called "SDMA" that can provide earlier identification of chronic kidney disease in cats, which is one of the leading causes of their death.

TSRI researchers find how mutant gene can cause deafness

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies.

Nail stem cells prove more versatile than press ons

There are plenty of body parts that don't grow back when you lose them. Nails are an exception, and a new study published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) reveals some of the reasons why.

Cost of meeting basic needs rising faster than wages in Washington state

A Washington family of four must spend 46 percent more on average to make ends meet today than 13 years ago, according to a new report from the University of Washington.

Novel regulatory mechanism for cell division found

A protein kinase or enzyme known as PKM2 has proven to control cell division, potentially providing a molecular basis for tumor diagnosis and treatment.

Researchers tease out glitches in immune system's self-recognition

Immunity is a thankless job. Though the army of cells known as the immune system continuously keeps us safe from a barrage of viruses, bacteria and even precancerous cells, we mainly notice it when something goes wrong: "Why did I get the flu this year even though I got vaccinated?" "Why does innocent pollen turn me into a red-eyed, sniffling mess?"

Weight and eating habits in Parkinson's disease

Patients affected by Parkinson's disease often show marked changes in body weight: they may gain or lose a lot of weight depending on the stage of the disease, or they may put on up to ten kilos after deep brain stimulation (a treatment to alleviate the symptoms).

Research finds tooth enamel fast-track in humans

The research found that incisor teeth grow quickly in the early stages of the second trimester of a baby's development, while molars grow at a slower rate in the third trimester.

Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event

A new discovery about the atomic structure of uranium dioxide will help scientists select the best computational model to simulate severe nuclear reactor accidents.

Type 2 diabetes: Added benefit of canagliflozin plus metformin is not proven

The fixed combination of canagliflozin with metformin (trade name: Vokanamet) has been approved since April 2014 for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in whom diet and exercise do not provide adequate glycaemic control.

Signaling molecule crucial to stem cell reprogramming

While investigating a rare genetic disorder, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that a ubiquitous signaling molecule is crucial to cellular reprogramming, a finding with significant implications for stem cell-based regenerative medicine, wound repair therapies and potential cancer treatments.

The riddle of the missing stars

Thanks to the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, some of the most mysterious cosmic residents have just become even more puzzling.

Halting the hijacker: Cellular targets to thwart influenza virus infection

The influenza virus, like all viruses, is a hijacker. It quietly slips its way inside cells, steals the machinery inside to make more copies of itself, and then -- having multiplied -- bursts out of the cell to find others to infect.

When shareholders exacerbate their own banks' crisis

Banks are increasingly issuing 'CoCo' bonds to boost the levels of equity they hold. In a crisis situation, bondholders are forced to convert these bonds into a bank's equity.

Testosterone plays modest role in menopausal women's sexual function

Levels of testosterone and other naturally-occurring reproductive hormones play a limited role in driving menopausal women's interest in sex and sexual function, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

The Lancet: Worldwide action needed to address hidden crisis of violence against women and girls

Current efforts to prevent violence against women and girls are inadequate, according to a new Series published in The Lancet.

Himalaya tectonic dam with a discharge

The Himalaya features some of the most impressive gorges on Earth that have been formed by rivers. The geologic history of the famous Tsangpo Gorge, in the eastern Himalaya, now needs to be rewritten.

The cellular origin of fibrosis

Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital have found the cellular origin of the tissue scarring caused by organ damage associated with diabetes, lung disease, high blood pressure, kidney disease, and other conditions.

For women, job authority adds to depression symptoms

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women, but decreases them among men, according to a new study from University of Texas at Austin sociologist Tetyana Pudrovska.

Every step you take: STING pathway key to tumor immunity

A recently discovered protein complex known as STING plays a crucial role in detecting the presence of tumor cells and promoting an aggressive anti-tumor response by the body's innate immune system, according to two separate studies published in the Nov. 20 issue of the journal Immunity.

UO-industry collaboration points to improved nanomaterials

A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has emerged from a collaboration of University of Oregon and industry researchers.

A coating that protects against heat and oxidation

Researchers have developed a coating technique that they plan to use to protect tur- bine engine and waste incinerator components against heat and oxidation. A topcoat from micro-scaled hollow aluminium oxide spheres provides heat insulation, in the lab, already proved more economical than conventional techniques.

Revealing political partisanship a bad idea on resumes

Displaced political aides looking for a new, nonpartisan job in the wake of the midterm power shuffle may fare better if they tone down any political references on their resumes, finds a new study from Duke University.

Education empowers Canadians but raises risks of overwork and work-family stress

The higher your level of education, the greater your earnings and your sense of "personal mastery" or being in control of your fate, University of Toronto researchers say. But wait: there's a downside.

Livermore Lab scientists show salinity matters when it comes to sea level changes

Using ocean observations and a large suite of climate models, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have found that long-term salinity changes have a stronger influence on regional sea level changes than previously thought.

New Technique Allows Ultrasound To Penetrate Bone, Metal

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a technique that allows ultrasound to penetrate bone or metal, using customized structures that offset the distortion usually caused by these so-called "aberrating layers."

Mediterranean meteorological tide has increased by over a millimetre a year since 1989

A new database developed by the University of Cantabria (Spain) provides data on sea level variation due to atmospheric changes in the south of Europe between 1948 and 2009. Over the last two decades sea levels have increased in the Mediterranean basin.

Quantum mechanical calculations reveal the hidden states of enzyme active sites

Enzymes carry out fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and respiration, with the help of clusters of metal atoms as "active" sites.

NRL Scientists Discover Novel Metamaterial Properties within Hexagonal Boron Nitride

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the University of Manchester, U.K.; Imperial College, London; University of California San Diego; and the National Institute of Material Science (NIMS), Japan, have demonstrated that confined surface phonon polaritons within hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) exhibit unique metamaterial properties that enable novel nanoscale optical devices for use in optical communications, super-resolution imaging, and improved infrared cameras and detectors.

Effectiveness of campaigns addressing violence against women and girls examined

Levels of violence against women and girls--such as female genital mutilation, trafficking, forced marriage and intimate partner violence--remain high across the world despite the global attention the issue has received.

© 2014 BrightSurf.com