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Curious new bush species growing 'bleeding' fruits named by a US class of 150 7th graders

A class of 150 US 7th graders has helped select a name for a newly discovered plant, which amazes with its fruits that appear to be bleeding once they are cut open.




Kids' eating habits highlight need for healthier lunchboxes

New research from the University of Adelaide in Australia shows children aged 9-10 years old are receiving almost half of their daily energy requirements from "discretionary" or junk foods.

Transplanted nerve cells survive a quarter of a century in a Parkinson's disease patient

In the late 1980s and over the 1990s, researchers at Lund University in Sweden pioneered the transplantation of new nerve cells into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease.

Seeking to rewind mammalian extinction

In December 2015 an international group of scientists convened in Austria to discuss the imminent extinction of the northern white rhinoceros and the possibility of bringing the species back from brink of extinction.

New research from Yale and MIT describes bioreactor to support whole lung regeneration

An innovative mechanical system that mimics the ventilation and blood flow in the chest cavity, housed in a specialized, sterile bioreactor, can support the growth of engineered whole lungs at human scale.

Number of HIV infections falling in United States, but fails to meet reduction goals

The number of new HIV infections occurring annually in the United States decreased by an estimated 11 percent from 2010 to 2015, while the HIV transmission rate decreased by an estimated 17 percent during the same time period, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Pennsylvania.

Study suggests medical errors now third leading cause of death in the US

Analyzing medical death rate data over an eight-year period, Johns Hopkins patient safety experts have calculated that more than 250,000 deaths per year are due to medical error in the U.S.

Ebola vaccine: Promising phase I trials

"The results for tolerability, safety, and the immune response to the vaccine candidate are very promising," explains Prof Marylyn Addo.

Underground fungi detected from space

Just as a person's skin indicates if s/he has a healthy diet, colored satellite images of forests in the Smithsonian's Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO) indicate if a forest has a healthy diet.

Study finds high rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in US

An estimated 30 percent of outpatient oral antibiotic prescriptions in the U.S. in 2010-2011 may have been inappropriate, findings that support the need for establishing a goal for outpatient antibiotic stewardship.

Research points to a new treatment for pancreatic cancer

Researchers have shown how controlling cholesterol metabolism in pancreatic cancer cells reduces metastasis, pointing to a potential new treatment using drugs previously developed for atherosclerosis.

Coastal birds rely on tides and moon phases

Coastal wading birds shape their lives around the tides, and new research in The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows that different species respond differently to shifting patterns of high and low water according to their size and daily schedules, even following prey cycles tied to the phases of the moon.

As global temperatures rise, children must be central climate change debates

Rising temperatures, rising sea levels and the increasing likelihood of extreme weather will all alter children's lives and the lives of their own children.

Herbal remedies are an overlooked global health hazard

Millions of people around the world use herbal health remedies, following a tradition that began millennia ago.

A compact, efficient single photon source that operates at ambient temperatures on a chip

Quantum information science and technology has emerged as a new paradigm for dramatically faster computation and secure communication in the 21st century.

Teens with allergies and asthma: Start prepping now for move to college

You're a teenager with allergies or asthma and later this year you'll be heading off to college. You may be thinking, "I have tons of time to get myself together before I leave." Not so much. Start now to consider how you'll shift gears.

Chemoradiotherapy vs. chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

In a study appearing in the May 3 issue of JAMA, Pascal Hammel, M.D., of Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France and colleagues assessed whether chemoradiotherapy improves overall survival of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer controlled after 4 months of gemcitabine-based induction chemotherapy, and assessed the effect of erlotinib on survival.

Surgery patients in lower income countries have three times greater risk of dying

New research has shown that patients undergoing emergency surgery in lower income countries have a three times greater chance of dying than in higher income countries.

Experts propose strategy to save mammals on the brink of extinction

With only three living individuals left on this planet, the northern white rhinoceros could be considered doomed for extinction.

Grape polyphenols help counter negative effects of high fat diet

Grape polyphenols helped offset some of the adverse health consequences of consuming a high fat diet rich in saturated fat, according to two laboratory studies conducted at the University of North Carolina Greensboro, and published recently in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry.

Researchers unveil architecture of mitochondrial calcium uniporter

Mitochondria are key integrators of cellular calcium (Ca2+) signaling and energy metabolism.

Updated Cochrane Review: Corticosteroids for managing tuberculous meningitis

The Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG) have carried out a review update to evaluate the effects of corticosteroids being used alongside anti-tuberculosis medication to treat people suffering from tuberculous meningitis.

Aggregated protein in nerve cells can cause ALS

Persons with the serious disorder ALS, can have a genetic mutation that causes the protein SOD1 to aggregate in motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord.

Scientists reveal how cell corrects errors made in gene transcription

RNA polymerase II (Pol II), a key enzyme in our gene expression, is responsible for transcribing DNA into messenger RNA.

Scientists double number of known genetic risk factors for endometrial cancer

An international collaboration of researchers has identified five new gene regions that increase a woman's risk of developing endometrial cancer, one of the most common cancers to affect women, taking the number of known gene regions associated with the disease to nine.

New drug against nerve agents in sight

The nerve agent sarin causes a deadly overstimulation of the nervous system that can be stopped if treated with an antidote within minutes of poisoning.

Placebo effects in women are boosted by vasopressin

A new study in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry suggests that women are particularly susceptible to the pain-relieving placebo effect of vasopressin.

Shared sanitation facilities and risk of diarrhea in children

Sharing a sanitation facility between households can be linked to increased risk of moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) in children under 5 y at some sites, according to Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) study findings published this week in PLOS Medicine.

The herring genome provides new insight on how species adapt to their environment

How species genetically adapt to their environment is a central question related to the evolution of biodiversity.

New insights on how oysters form shells

Researchers know that several proteins are involved in oyster shell formation, but how expression of these proteins is controlled is not well understood.

Adults with bipolar disorder at equal risk for anxiety or depression following mania

Adults with bipolar disorder are just as likely to develop anxiety as depression following an episode of mania, according to data from a national survey of more than 34,000 adults.

Placenta size and offspring bone development linked

Researchers at the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, studied 518 children in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) who underwent bone scans at nine, 15 and 17 years old.

Many Americans putting vision at risk from sun damage

Three-quarters of Americans are concerned about potential eye problems from the sun's ultraviolet rays, yet only 31 percent protect their eyes with sunglasses or other UV-protective eyewear every time they go outside, according to a new nationwide survey released today.

An experiment seeks to make quantum physics visible to the naked eye

Predictions from quantum physics have been confirmed by countless experiments, but no one has yet detected the quantum physical effect of entanglement directly with the naked eye.

Group activities reduced depressive symptoms among older people with dementia

Both a high-intensity functional exercise programme and a non-exercise group activity, conducted among older care facility residents with dementia, reduced high levels of depressive symptoms. However, exercise had no superior effect on depression, according to a dissertation from Umeå University.

Research on modern day animals reveals insights into extinct animals

Powerful head and neck retractions of vertebrate carcasses, including dinosaur fossils, have puzzled researchers as to whether they occurred just before an animal's death in agony, or after.

Turn up the heat to increase altitude tolerance

Altitude training is a popular method for athletes wanting to improve their physical performance. At high altitudes oxygen levels are blood cells.

Extended rest between weight lifting sets could help muscle growth

Researchers from the University of Birmingham have found that extended rest intervals between sets of weight-lifting could help with muscle growth.

No evidence of an association between silent brain infarcts and having migraine with aura

A large cross-sectional study focused on women with migraines with aura and compared their brain MRI images with those of women not suffering from migraine.

Perceived diversity in neighborhoods is related to more prejudice, study finds

People who think they live in diverse neighbourhoods are less likely to be accepting of minority ethnic groups, an international research project by the University of Sheffield has found.

Early warning: Current Japanese encephalitis vaccine might not protect

Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis (infection of the brain) in Asia.

One in four patients with COPD suffer from depression

Although there have been discussions about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a condition impacting 24 million Americans, and depression, there has been little research showing the impact depression has on patients with COPD.

New guidelines explain how to monitor and treat hyperthyroid cats

Over the last 30+ years, veterinary professionals' understanding of clinical feline hyperthyroidism (FHT) has evolved tremendously. Initially FHT cats were referred to a specialist and now primary practitioners routinely manage these cases.

Imodium for a legal high is as dumb and dangerous as it sounds

The over-the-counter anti-diarrhea medication Imodium¨, or its key ingredient loperamide, is increasingly being abused by people attempting to self-treat their opioid addiction, with sometime fatal results.

Satellites to see Mercury enter spotlight on May 9

It happens only a little more than once a decade and the next chance to see it is Monday, May 9, 2016. Throughout the U.S., sky watchers can watch Mercury pass between Earth and the sun in a rare astronomical event known as a planetary transit.

A faster and cheaper way to produce new antibiotics

A novel way of synthesising a promising new antibiotic has been identified by scientists at the University of Bristol.

Current whale migration models are too simplified

New research challenges the traditional view that baleen whales (Mysticetes) migrate between high-latitude feeding areas and low-latitude breeding areas.

Web-based, self-help intervention helps prevent depression

Among patients experiencing some symptoms of depression, the use of a web-based guided self-help intervention reduced the incidence of major depressive disorder over 12 months compared with enhanced usual care.

Combining your home and work life can be better for role performance say researchers

Leaving work at the office and home at the door may not always be the best strategy for employee well-being and performance, finds a new study published in the journal Human Relations by SAGE in partnership with The Tavistock Institute.

Ultrasound-estimated fat content in muscles may be an indicator of physical health

Ultrasound-estimated percent intramuscular fat of muscles in the lower extremity was inversely associated with physical activity level and positively associated with body mass index in a recent study.

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