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Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Self-cooling solar cells boost power, last longer

Scientists may have overcome one of the major hurdles in developing high-efficiency, long-lasting solar cells-keeping them cool, even in the blistering heat of the noonday Sun.




New research links bad diet to loss of smell

Could stuffing yourself full of high-fat foods cause you to lose your sense of smell?

Penn Study: Understanding Graphene's Electrical Properties on an Atomic Level

Graphene, a material that consists of a lattice of carbon atoms, one atom thick, is widely touted as being the most electrically conductive material ever studied.

Major dopamine system helps restore consciousness after general anesthesia, study finds

Researchers may be one step closer to better understanding how anesthesia works.

Global warming 'pause' reflects natural fluctuation

In a paper published this month in Geophysical Research Letters, Lovejoy concludes that a natural cooling fluctuation during this period largely masked the warming effects of a continued increase in man-made emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.

Organic apple orchards benefit from green compost applications

In traditional apple orchards, effective management practices rely on two interrelated components: finding ways to manage competitive vegetation under the trees, and supplying important supplemental nutrition to trees.

IU researcher and colleague provide guide to household water conservation

Want to conserve water and save on your utility bill? A paper co-written by an Indiana University researcher and published in the current issue of the journal Environment can help.

Low Strength Brain Stimulation May Be Effective for Depression

Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed onset. For example, a patient may receive several weeks of regular ECT treatments before a full response is achieved.

LSUHSC contributes to work identifying new DNA regions associated with schizophrenia

Nancy Buccola, MSN, APRN, PMHCNS-BC, CNE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Nursing, contributed samples used in a study reporting new locations of genetic material associated with schizophrenia and also suggesting a possible link between the immune system and schizophrenia.

Temple study compares deep vein thrombosis therapies

Patients who have a clot in their legs and are considering whether to be treated with traditional blood-thinning medication or undergo a minimally-invasive catheter-based clot removal procedure should feel comfortable that there is no difference in death rates between the two treatments, although there are more bleeding risks with the catheter procedure, according to a study by Temple University School of Medicine researchers.

Potential new flu drugs target immune response, not virus

The seriousness of disease often results from the strength of immune response, rather than with the virus, itself.

Climate: Meat turns up the heat

Eating meat contributes to climate change, due to greenhouse gasses emitted by livestock. New research finds that livestock emissions are on the rise and that beef cattle are responsible for far more greenhouse gas emissions than other types of animals. It is published by Climactic Change.

Water, water -- not everywhere: Mapping water trends for African maize

Today's food production relies heavily on irrigation, but across sub-Saharan Africa only 4 percent of cultivated land is irrigated, compared with a global average of 18 percent. Small-scale farming is the main livelihood for many people in the region, who depend on rainfall to water their crops.

Press Release: Has Antarctic sea ice expansion been overestimated?

New research suggests that Antarctic sea ice may not be expanding as fast as previously thought. A team of scientists say much of the increase measured for Southern Hemisphere sea ice could be due to a processing error in the satellite data.

New York squirrels are nuts about city life

Curtin University-led research has shown squirrels have adapted to New York City's human behaviour, allowing them to thrive just as well, if not better, than their fellow squirrels in the woods.

Transiting Exoplanet with Longest Known Year

Astronomers have discovered a transiting exoplanet with the longest known year. Kepler-421b circles its star once every 704 days.

Vanderbilt discovery may advance colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment

A Vanderbilt University-led research team has identified protein "signatures" of genetic mutations that drive colorectal cancer, the nation's second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer.

Unique study focuses on combined treatment approach for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

Investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute are developing a novel, multistep investigational treatment for one of the most complex and difficult-to-treat forms of the disease, locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus detected in the air of a Saudi Arabian camel barn

Saudi Arabian researchers have detected genetic fragments of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in the air of a barn holding a camel infected with the virus.

New technique uses 'simulated' human heart to screen drugs

A Coventry University scientist has developed a pioneering new way - using samples of beating heart tissue - to test the effect of drugs on the heart without using human or animal trials.

UCI researchers find epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders

Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain's prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to UC Irvine scientists.

Mixed genes mix up the migrations of hybrid birds

Mixed genes appear to drive hybrid birds to select more difficult routes than their parent species, according to new research from University of British Columbia zoologists.

Comparing deep vein thrombosis treatments

Utilization of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT, where imaging is used to guide treatment to the site of a blood clot in order to dissolve it) has increased in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and there appeared to be no difference in in-hospital mortality rates for patients treated with CDT compared with anticoagulation alone, although patients treated with CDT had more adverse events.

Philosopher uses game theory to understand how words, actions acquire meaning

Why does the word "dog" have meaning? If you say "dog" to a friend, why does your friend understand you?

International team sheds new light on biology underlying schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from Canada's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date.

Bacteria swim with whole body, not just propellers

When it comes to swimming, the bodies of some bacteria are more than just dead weight, according to new research from Brown University.

New accurate epigenetic test could eliminate unnecessary repeat biopsies for prostate cancer

More than one million prostate biopsies are performed each year in the U.S. alone, including many repeat biopsies for fear of cancer missed.

Young women with a heart attack continue to fare worse than men

While awareness campaigns may be getting women to go to the hospital more quickly during a heart-attack, a new look at hospital data shows women have longer hospital stays and are more likely than men to die in the hospital after a heart attack.

LEDs shine in bedding plant production study

Growers of annual bedding plant seedlings or plugs work to produce compact, fully rooted transplants with a large stem diameter and high root dry mass--qualities that make seedlings less susceptible to damage during shipping and transplant.

Study offers new clues about the source of racial health disparities

A first-of-its-kind study by researchers at USC and Loyola Marymount University (LMU) has found evidence that the persistent health disparities across race may, in part, be related to anxiety about being confronted by negative racial stereotypes while receiving healthcare.

Parents rank their obese children as 'very healthy'

A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine-led study suggests that parents of obese children often do not recognize the potentially serious health consequences of childhood weight gain or the importance of daily physical activity in helping their child reach a healthy weight.

Mammoth and Mastodon Behavior Was Less Roam, More Stay at Home

Their scruffy beards weren't ironic, but there are reasons mammoths and mastodons could have been the hipsters of the Ice Age.

Strategies to preserve myelin during secondary degeneration following neurotrauma

Researchers at the University of Western Australia, led by Associate Professor Melinda Fitzgerald, have discovered that preventing abnormalities in the insulating sheath surrounding nerve cells is associated with better function following neurotrauma.

Mothers of children with autism benefit from peer-led intervention

Peer-led interventions that target parental well-being can significantly reduce stress, depression and anxiety in mothers of children with disabilities, according to new findings released today in the journal Pediatrics.

Oregon chemists eye improved thin films with metal substitution

The yield so far is small, but chemists at the University of Oregon have developed a low-energy, solution-based mineral substitution process to make a precursor to transparent thin films that could find use in electronics and alternative energy devices.

Ginkgo biloba enhances neurogenesis and improves recovery following a stroke in mice

Led by Dr. Zahoor A. Shah, Dr. Shadia E. Nada and Jatin Tulsulkar (graduate student), researchers at the University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, have discovered that mice treated with Ginkgo biloba 4 hours after inducing experimental stroke and then daily for seven days had improved recovery and less brain damage than the control mice.

Creating optical cables out of thin air

Imagine being able to instantaneously run an optical cable or fiber to any point on earth, or even into space. That's what Howard Milchberg, professor of physics and electrical and computer engineering at the University of Maryland, wants to do.

Marmoset sequence sheds new light on primate biology and evolution

An international team of scientists led by the Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University St. Louis, including a researcher from the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth shedding new light on primate biology and evolution.

Low-income students in charter high schools less likely to engage in risky behavior

Low-income minority adolescents who were admitted to high-performing public charter high schools in Los Angeles were significantly less likely to engage in risky health behaviors than their peers who were not admitted to those schools, according to a new UCLA-led study.

Viral therapy could boost limb-saving cancer treatment

Viruses designed to target and kill cancer cells could boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy to the arms and legs and help avoid amputation, a new study reports.

Cleveland Clinic researchers discover neuroprotective role of immune cell

A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

Schizophrenia's genetic 'skyline' rising

The largest genomic dragnet of any psychiatric disorder to date has unmasked 108 chromosomal sites harboring inherited variations in the genetic code linked to schizophrenia, 83 of which had not been previously reported.

Age-related macular degeneration occurs much earlier than previously assumed

It is widely accepted that age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of visual impairment and blindness in industrialized countries.

Described novel regulator of the activity of a protein inactive in over 50% of human tumors

Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the University of Barcelona have discovered the interaction between HERC2 proteins with another protein called p53 that is inactivated in more than half of human tumors. The study results were published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Largest gene discovery 'kick-starts' new search for schizophrenia treatments

The discovery of over a hundred genetic risk factors linked to schizophrenia provides vital new clues in understanding what causes the condition and will kick-start the search for new treatments, according to leading UK scientists.

Try, try again? Study says no

When it comes to learning languages, adults and children have different strengths. Adults excel at absorbing the vocabulary needed to navigate a grocery store or order food in a restaurant, but children have an uncanny ability to pick up on subtle nuances of language that often elude adults.

Parents want info about circumcision, not directives from health-care providers

Most parents expect healthcare providers to answer their questions about circumcision, but they don't want a specific recommendation on the procedure, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health.

X-ray irradiation at a certain dose alters the neuronal cytoskeleton and cytomechanics

Cranial radiotherapy is one of the most important therapeutic methods for the treatment of various types of primary and metastatic brain tumors.

Natural-terrain schoolyards reduce children's stress, says Colorado University-Boulder study

Playing in schoolyards that feature natural habitats and trees and not just asphalt and recreation equipment reduces children's stress and inattention, according to a University of Colorado Boulder study.

The economic territory of Upper Palaeolithic groups is specified by flint

Never before had the mobility patterns and management of lithic resources in the Upper Palaeolithic been determined so precisely.

NRL Reveals New Meteorological Insight into Mid-Level Clouds

Research meteorologists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Marine Meteorology Division (MMD) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, employing the Navy's Mid-Course Doppler Radar (MCR) at Cape Canaveral, were able to characterize mid-level, mixed-phase altocumulus clouds.

International team sheds new light on biology underlying schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and scores of other institutions from all over the world have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date.

Acupuncture at the Taixi activates cerebral neurons in old patients with MCI

Previous findings have demonstrated that acupuncture at the Taixi (KI3) acupoint in healthy youths can activate neurons in cognitive-related cerebral cortex.

Iodine may alleviate swelling in retinitis pigmentosa patients' retinas

Cystoid macular edema (CME) is a common complication of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of retinal diseases in which patients typically lose night and side vision first and then develop impaired central vision.

Carbyne morphs when stretched

Applying just the right amount of tension to a chain of carbon atoms can turn it from a metallic conductor to an insulator, according to Rice University scientists.

Filter bed substrates, plant types recommended for rain gardens

Urban stormwater runoff is causing problems for the world's water sources.

Stem cells aid muscle repair and strengthening after resistance exercise

A new study in mice reveals that mesenchymal (mezz-EN-chem-uhl) stem cells (MSCs) help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise.

Overcoming barriers to physical activity for African-American women

According to the Centers for Disease Control, approximately four out of five black women are overweight or obese and 36 percent meet physical activity objectives as determined by the CDC. That's compared to 50 percent of white women meeting the same objectives.

New planthopper species found in southern Spain

Not much is known about the the genus of planthopper known as Conosimus, which now includes six species after a new one was recently discovered in the southern part of the Iberian Peninsula in the Spanish city of Jaen.

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson syndrome

A new study provides the most definitive characterization of the autism-like intellectual disability disorder Christianson syndrome and provides the first diagnostic criteria to help doctors and families identify and understand the condition. Initial evidence suggests CS could affect tens of thousands of boys worldwide.

High school lacrosse players at risk of concussions other injuries

With over 170,000 students now playing high school lacrosse, more and more are being exposed to injuries during practice and competition, according to a new study from the Colorado School of Public Health and the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

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