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Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Study Reveals Immune System is Dazed and Confused During Spaceflight

There is nothing like a head cold to make us feel a little dazed. We get things like colds and the flu because of changes in our immune system.




500 million year reset for the immune system

A single factor can reset the immune system of mice to a state likely similar to what it was 500 million years ago, when the first vertebrates emerged.

Zombie ant fungi manipulate hosts to die on the 'doorstep' of the colony

A parasitic fungus that must kill its ant hosts outside their nest to reproduce and transmit their infection, manipulates its victims to die in the vicinity of the colony, ensuring a constant supply of potential new hosts, according to researchers at Penn State and colleagues at Brazil's Federal University of Vicosa.

Why global warming is taking a break

Global warming is currently taking a break: whereas global temperatures rose drastically into the late 1990s, the global average temperature has risen only slightly since 1998 - surprising, considering scientific climate models predicted considerable warming due to rising greenhouse gas emissions.

Leukemia drug shows promise for skin, breast and other cancers

A leukemia drug called dasatinib shows promise for treating skin, breast and several other cancers, according to researchers at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

The difficult question of Clostridium difficile

The bacterium Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-related diarrhoea and is a growing problem in the hospital environment and elsewhere in the community.

Exporting US coal to Asia could drop emissions 21 percent

Under the right scenario, exporting U.S. coal to power plants in South Korea could lead to a 21 percent drop in greenhouse gas emissions compared to burning the fossil fuel at plants in the United States, according to a new Duke University-led study.

Recycling old batteries into solar cells

This could be a classic win-win solution: A system proposed by researchers at MIT recycles materials from discarded car batteries - a potential source of lead pollution - into new, long-lasting solar panels that provide emissions-free power.

No one-size-fits-all approach in a changing climate, changing land

As climate change alters habitats for birds and bees and everything in between, so too does the way humans decide to use land.

Pygmy phenotype developed many times, adaptive to rainforest

The small body size associated with the pygmy phenotype is probably a selective adaptation for rainforest hunter-gatherers, according to an international team of researchers, but all African pygmy phenotypes do not have the same genetic underpinning, suggesting a more recent adaptation than previously thought.

Climate Change Will Threaten Fish by Drying Out Southwest U.S. Streams, Study Predicts

Fish species native to a major Arizona watershed may lose access to important segments of their habitat by 2050 as surface water flow is reduced by the effects of climate warming, new research suggests.

Zebrafish help to unravel Alzheimer's disease

New fundamental knowledge about the regulation of stem cells in the nerve tissue of zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into neurodegenerative disease processes in the human brain. A new study by scientists at VIB and KU Leuven identifies the molecules responsible for this process.

Researchers inspired by marine life to design camouflage systems

It could be a fun party trick - put your cell phone down on a table and watch it fade into the woodwork - or part of a lifesaving technology used by industry or the military.

Applying new cholesterol guidelines to a patient population reduces heart attacks, strokes, study finds

A study from UT Southwestern researchers found that recently introduced cholesterol guidelines would significantly reduce new cardiovascular events, when compared to treatment based on previous cholesterol guidelines.

Dress for Success: UC Research Examines Male Influences on 'Looking' Middle Class

They might be called a chip off the old block, but when it comes to upward social mobility, they might call Dad a lesson in what not to wear.

Opioid users breathe easier with novel drug to treat respiratory depression

People taking prescription opioids to treat moderate to severe pain may be able to breathe a little easier, literally.

NOAA analysis reveals significant land cover changes in US coastal regions

A new NOAA nationwide analysis shows that between 1996 and 2011, 64,975 square miles in coastal regions--an area larger than the state of Wisconsin--experienced changes in land cover, including a decline in wetlands and forest cover with development a major contributing factor.

Trees and shrubs invading critical grasslands, diminish cattle production

Half of the Earth's land mass is made up of rangelands, which include grasslands and savannas, yet they are being transformed at an alarming rate.

Old naked mole rats are young at heart, study finds

Cardiovascular disease is the greatest killer of humans the world over, presenting huge financial and quality-of-life issues.

Innate lymphoid cells elicit T cell responses

In case of an inflammation the body releases substances that increase the immune defense. During chronic inflammation, this immune response gets out of control and can induce organ damage.

Purdue ag economists: Shale oil 'dividend' could pay for smaller carbon footprint

Unanticipated economic benefits from the shale oil and gas boom could help offset the costs of substantially reducing the U.S.'s carbon footprint, Purdue agricultural economists say.

Happiness in schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is among the most severe forms of mental illness, yet some people with the disease are as happy as those in good physical and mental health according to a study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

Researchers obtain key insights into how the internal body clock is tuned

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new way that internal body clocks are regulated by a type of molecule known as long non-coding RNA.

Men fare worse than women in China regarding discrimination among obese workers

New research that analyzes economic disparity among obese Chinese adults shows that there is no wage disparity for obese women in China, but there is pay inequality among obese men.

Bionic Liquids from Lignin

While the powerful solvents known as ionic liquids show great promise for liberating fermentable sugars from lignocellulose and improving the economics of advanced biofuels, an even more promising candidate is on the horizon - bionic liquids.

More than just X and Y: A new genetic basis for sex determination

Men and women differ in plenty of obvious ways, and scientists have long known that genetic differences buried deep within our DNA underlie these distinctions.

Study at Deepwater Horizon spill site finds key to tracking pollutants

A new study of the ocean circulation patterns at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill reveals the significant role small-scale ocean currents play in the spread of pollutants.

New Tool Makes Online Personal Data More Transparent

The web can be an opaque black box: it leverages our personal information without our knowledge or control. When, for instance, a user sees an ad about depression online, she may not realize that she is seeing it because she recently sent an email about being sad.

Quasi-Legal Drug Fifteen Times Stronger Than Heroin Hides in Plain Sight

Emergency physicians should expect "an upswing in what on the surface appear to be heroin overdoses," but are actually overdoses tied to acetyl fentanyl, an opiate that is mixed into street drugs marketed as heroin.

Waterloo makes public most complete Antarctic map for climate research

The University of Waterloo has unveiled a new satellite image of Antarctica, and the imagery will help scientists all over the world gain new insight into the effects of climate change.

Natural (born) killer cells battle pediatric leukemia

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown that a select team of immune-system cells from patients with leukemia can be multiplied in the lab, creating an army of natural killer cells that can be used to destroy the cancer cells.

Rheumatologic diseases like lupus can initially look like neurological disorders

Lupus and other rheumatologic diseases can initially present as neurological disorders such as headaches and seizures, and thus delay diagnosis for many months, according to Loyola University Medical Center neurologists.

Engineering long-lasting joint lubrication by mimicking nature

By finding a way to bind a slippery molecule naturally found in the fluid that surrounds healthy joints, Johns Hopkins researchers have engineered surfaces that have the potential to deliver long-lasting lubrication at specific spots throughout the body.

Massachussetts General-developed device monitors key step in development of tumor metastases

A microfluidic device developed at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) may help study key steps in the process by which cancer cells break off from a primary tumor to invade other tissues and form metastases.

Сalculations with Nanoscale Smart Particles

Researchers from the Institute of General Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and MIPT have made an important step towards creating medical nanorobots. They discovered a way of enabling nano- and microparticles to produce logical calculations using a variety of biochemical reactions.

Scaling up health innovation: Fertility awareness-based family planning goes national

There is no guarantee that a successful pilot program introducing a health innovation can be expanded successfully to the national, regional, state or even metropolitan level because scaling up is typically complex and difficult.

New mouse model points to therapy for liver disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common affliction, affecting almost 30 percent of Americans, with a significant number suffering from its most severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer.

How steroid hormones enable plants to grow

Plants can adapt extremely quickly to changes in their environment. Hormones, chemical messengers that are activated in direct response to light and temperature stimuli help them achieve this.

Clinical practice guidelines: Trying to get them right the first time

The common thought in the medical community is that the randomized, controlled trial is the gold standard in medical research.

Project serves up big data to guide managing nation's coastal waters

When it comes to understanding America's coastal fisheries, anecdotes are gripping - stories of a choking algae bloom, or a bay's struggle with commercial development. But when it comes to taking action, there's no beating big data.

Intimacy a strong motivator for PrEP HIV prevention

Men in steady same-sex relationships where both partners are HIV negative will often forgo condoms out of a desire to preserve intimacy, even if they also have sex outside the relationship.

Are children who play violent video games at greater risk for depression?

While much attention has focused on the link between violent video game playing and aggression among youths, a new study finds significantly increased signs of depression among preteens with high daily exposure to violent video games.

UM Research Improves Temperature Modeling Across Mountainous Landscapes

New research by University of Montana doctoral student Jared Oyler provides improved computer models for estimating temperature across mountainous landscapes.

Fish study links brain size to parental duties

Male stickleback fish that protect their young have bigger brains than counterparts that don't care for offspring, finds a new University of British Columbia study.

Genetic key to lupus shows potential of personalised medicine

Medical researchers have used DNA sequencing to identify a gene variant responsible for causing lupus in a young patient.

Free fatty acids may be as effective as antibiotics in treating catheter infections

Researchers at Rhode Island Hospital, Veterans Affair Medical Center in Providence and University of Rhode Island have found that a free fatty acid, made up of compounds similar to those naturally made in the body, may be as effective at fighting certain infections as antibiotics.

Vaccines can cut the spread of meningitis by nearly 40 percent

Investigators at the University of Southampton have discovered that two new vaccines can prevent the transmission of meningitis bacteria from person to person.

A new species of endemic treefrog from Madagascar

A new species of the Boophis rappiodes group is described from the hidden streams of Ankarafa Forest, northwest of Madagascar. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

GW Researchers Develop Model to Study Impact of Faculty Development Programs

Methods used to demonstrate the impact of faculty development programs have long been lacking.

NASA's RXTE Satellite Decodes the Rhythm of an Unusual Black Hole

Astronomers have uncovered rhythmic pulsations from a rare type of black hole 12 million light-years away by sifting through archival data from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite.

Daughters provide as much elderly parent care as they can, sons do as little as possible

Parents are better off having daughters if they want to be cared for in their old age suggests a new study, which finds that women appear to provide as much elderly parent care as they can, while men contribute as little as possible.

Anesthesia professionals not sufficiently aware of risks of postoperative cognitive side effects

Postsurgical cognitive side effects can have major implications for the level of care, length of hospital stay, and the patient's perceived quality of care, especially in elderly and fragile patients.

Graphene rubber bands could stretch limits of current healthcare, new research finds

Although body motion sensors already exist in different forms, they have not been widely used due to their complexity and cost of production.

Proteins critical to wound healing identified

Mice missing two important proteins of the vascular system develop normally and appear healthy in adulthood, as long as they don't become injured. If they do, their wounds don't heal properly, a new study shows.

White, straight women leading surge in infertility treatments

Heterosexual white women are twice as likely as racial or sexual minority women to obtain medical help to get pregnant, according to a recent study published by the American Psychological Association.

Deaths rise with shift from in-hospital to outpatient procedures for urology surgeries

As hospitals have shifted an array of common urological surgeries from inpatient procedures to outpatient, potentially preventable deaths have increased following complications.

Prioritizing suicide research can help lead to fewer suicide attempts and deaths

In a new supplement to the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, experts address the state of the science on suicide prevention and provide useful recommendations for research to inform effective suicide prevention.

Study suggests hatha yoga boosts brain function in older adults

Practicing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks improved sedentary older adults' performance on cognitive tasks that are relevant to everyday life, researchers report.

Witness to the Execution: Family Members of Victims Pose a Growing Challenge for Capital Punishment

An examination of the nation's history in carrying out executions is encountering a new challenge for modern-day capital punishment.

Why aren't pregnant women getting flu vaccine?

Both mother and fetus are at increased risk for complications of flu infection during pregnancy. And prenatal care providers say they're advising women to get the flu vaccine, in line with recommendations from various organizations. But many pregnant women don't understand the importance of this advice-and don't get the vaccine.

Hand gestures improve learning in both signers and speakers

Spontaneous gesture can help children learn, whether they use a spoken language or sign language, according to a new report.

Study finds increased rates of preventable deaths in the US following common urologic procedures

In recent years, a shift from inpatient to outpatient surgery in the U.S. for commonly performed urologic procedures has coincided with increasing deaths following complications that were potentially recognizable or preventable.

Neglected boys may turn into violent adolescents

Parents who physically neglect their boys may increase the risk that they will raise violent adolescents, according to Penn State sociologists.

Physically fit kids have beefier brain white matter than their less-fit peers

A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit.

Pigs' hearts transplanted into baboon hosts remain viable more than a year

Investigators from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have successfully transplanted hearts from genetically engineered piglets into baboons' abdomens and had the hearts survive for more than one year, twice as long as previously reported.

Life After Prison: UC Research Analyzes Ex-Offenders' Stigma Management

Todd Callais, an assistant professor of sociology at UC Blue Ash College, presented his findings on how ex-inmates cope with life after prison at the American Sociological Association (ASA) Annual Meeting, held Aug. 16-19 in San Francisco.

Unlike less educated people, college grads more active on weekends than weekdays

People's educational attainment influences their level of physical activity both during the week and on weekends, according to a study whose authors include two University of Kansas researchers.

Researchers block plant hormone

Researchers trying to get new information about the metabolism of plants can switch off individual genes and study the resulting changes.

Blood pressure medication does not cause more falls

It's time to question the common belief that patients receiving intensive blood pressure treatment are prone to falling and breaking bones.

Nurses driven mainly by a desire to help others are more likely to burn out

Nurses who are motivated primarily by the desire to help others, rather than by enjoyment of the work itself or the lifestyle it makes possible, are more likely to burn out on the job, University of Akron researchers say.

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