Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 
Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Rating the Planet's Oceans

The most comprehensive assessment conducted by the Ocean Health Index rates the Earth's oceans at 67 out of 100 in overall health.




Nanoparticles Accumulate Quickly in Wetland Sediment

A Duke University team has found that nanoparticles called single-walled carbon nanotubes accumulate quickly in the bottom sediments of an experimental wetland setting, an action they say could indirectly damage the aquatic food chain.

Laying siege to beta-amyloid, the key protein in Alzheimer's disease

The peptide -a small protein- beta-amyloid is strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease; however, researchers are still looking for unequivocal proof that this peptide is the causal agent of the onset and development of the disease.

New blood test determines whether you have or are likely to get cancer

A new research report published in the October 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal may make the early detection of cancer as easy as a simple blood test.

NASA's Swift Mission Observes Mega Flares from a Mini Star

On April 23, NASA's Swift satellite detected the strongest, hottest, and longest-lasting sequence of stellar flares ever seen from a nearby red dwarf star. The initial blast from this record-setting series of explosions was as much as 10,000 times more powerful than the largest solar flare ever recorded.

Genetic test would help 'cut bowel cancer spread'

Screening families of patients with bowel cancer for a genetic condition would cut their risk of developing bowel, womb, and ovarian cancers, new research has found.

Selectively Rewiring the Brain's Circuitry to Treat Depression

On Star Trek, it is easy to take for granted the incredible ability of futuristic doctors to wave small devices over the heads of both humans and aliens, diagnose their problems through evaluating changes in brain activity or chemistry, and then treat behavior problems by selectively stimulating relevant brain circuits.

A Heartbeat Away? Hybrid

Because heart cells cannot multiply and cardiac muscles contain few stem cells, heart tissue is unable to repair itself after a heart attack.

Targeted treatment could halt womb cancer growth

A drug which targets a key gene fault could halt an aggressive womb cancer and shrink tumours, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer.

How to make a 'perfect' solar absorber

The key to creating a material that would be ideal for converting solar energy to heat is tuning the material's spectrum of absorption just right: It should absorb virtually all wavelengths of light that reach Earth's surface from the sun - but not much of the rest of the spectrum, since that would increase the energy that is reradiated by the material, and thus lost to the conversion process.

Disease decoded: Gene mutation may lead to development of new cancer drugs

The discovery of a gene mutation that causes a rare premature aging disease could lead to the development of drugs that block the rapid, unstoppable cell division that makes cancer so deadly.

Immunotherapy could stop resistance to radiotherapy

Treating cancers with immunotherapy and radiotherapy at the same time could stop them from becoming resistant to treatment, according to a study published in Cancer Research today.

Pollution linked to lethal sea turtle tumors

Pollution in urban and farm runoff in Hawaii is causing tumors in endangered sea turtles, a new study finds.

Virginia Tech researchers discover potential biomarker to detect 'bubble boy' disorder

Many people recognize "the bubble boy" as an unusual character from a "Seinfeld" episode or a John Travolta movie.

'Virtual Breast' Could Improve Cancer Detection

Next to lung cancer, breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women, according to the American Cancer Society.

Researchers Show EEG's Potential to Reveal Depolarizations Following TBI

he potential for doctors to measure damaging "brain tsunamis" in injured patients without opening the skull has moved a step closer to reality, thanks to pioneering research at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Neuroscience Institute.

Adolescent exposure to thc may cause immune systems to go up in smoke

When it comes to using marijuana, new research, involving mice and published in the October 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggests that just because you can do it, doesn't mean that you should.

NEJM: Crizotinib Effective in Phase 1 Trial Against ROS1 Lung Cancer

The New England Journal of Medicine reports positive results of a phase 1 clinical trial of the drug crizotinib against the subset of lung cancer marked by rearrangement of the gene ROS1.

Microbes in Central Park soil: If they can make it there, they can make it anywhere

Soil microbes that thrive in the deserts, rainforests, prairies and forests of the world can also be found living beneath New York City's Central Park, according to a surprising new study led by Colorado State University and the University of Colorado Boulder.

Platinum meets its match in quantum dots from coal

Graphene quantum dots created at Rice University grab onto graphene platelets like barnacles attach themselves to the hull of a boat. But these dots enhance the properties of the mothership, making them better than platinum catalysts for certain reactions within fuel cells.

Scientists identify which genes are active in muscles of men and women

If you want your doctor to know what goes wrong with your muscles because of age, disease or injury, it's a good idea to know what "normal" actually is.

New material steals oxygen from air

Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have synthesized crystalline materials that can bind and store oxygen in high concentrations.The stored oxygen can be released again when and where it is needed.

Results of large-scale roll out of combination treatment for kala-azar in Eastern Africa

Today in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, at the occasion of the Leishmaniasis East Africa Platform meeting, which has gathered some 150 African and international leishmaniasis experts, results of a pharmacovigilance - or large-scale treatment safety and efficacy monitoring - plan, carried out by MSF, DNDi, and national partners in Kenya, Sudan, Uganda, and Ethiopia, were presented to key decision makers in order to boost patient access to treatment of kala-azar with the combination of Sodium Stibogluconate and Paromomycin (SSG&PM) in the region.

To improve oral health of adults with developmental disabilities, support caregivers

Despite a policy focus on expanding access to care for adults with developmental disabilities, this vulnerable population continues to have significant dental disease.

Fall in monsoon rains driven by rise in air pollution, study shows

Emissions produced by human activity have caused annual monsoon rainfall to decline over the past 50 years, a study suggests.

Driving cancer cells to suicide

LMU researchers report that a new class of chemical compounds makes cancer cells more sensitive to chemotherapeutic drugs. They have also pinpointed the relevant target enzyme, thus identifying a new target for anti-tumor agents.

Genetic test for cancer patients could be cost-effective and prevent further cases

Screening for a genetic condition in younger people who are diagnosed with bowel cancer would be cost-effective for the NHS and prevent new cases in them and their relatives, new research has concluded.

Gene interacts with stress and leads to heart disease in some people

A new genetic finding from Duke Medicine suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress, leading to diabetes and heart disease.

Changing Antarctic waters could trigger steep rise in sea levels

Current changes in the ocean around Antarctica are disturbingly close to conditions 14,000 years ago that new research shows may have led to the rapid melting of Antarctic ice and an abrupt 3-4 metre rise in global sea level.

Americans undergo colonoscopies too often, study finds

Colonoscopies are a very valuable procedure by which to screen for the presence of colorectal cancer.

High-speed drug screen

MIT engineers have devised a way to rapidly test hundreds of different drug-delivery vehicles in living animals, making it easier to discover promising new ways to deliver a class of drugs called biologics, which includes antibodies, peptides, RNA, and DNA, to human patients.

U.S. Military Making Progress on Reducing Stigma Associated with Seeking Help For Mental Illness

The U.S. Department of Defense has made progress in reducing the stigma associated with seeking help for mental illnesses such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, but more improvement is still needed, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

On the trail of the truffle flavor

Truffles, along with caviar, are among the most expensive foods in the world. Because they grow underground, people use trained dogs or pigs to find them.

Expect 6000 more Australian deaths if pollution rises to 'safe' threshold

A leading pollution expert is warning Australian governments not to use the existing national pollution standards when assessing new infrastructure projects.

Predicting the future course of psychotic illness

Psychiatry researchers from the University of Adelaide have developed a model that could help to predict a patient's likelihood of a good outcome from treatment - from their very first psychotic episode.

Entanglement made tangible

Quantum entanglement refers to the "pairing" of two subatomic particles in such a way that they form a whole quantum system.

Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids linked to smaller risk of coronary heart disease

A recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland shows that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.

Synthetic sperm protein raises the chance for successful in vitro fertilization

Having trouble getting pregnant-even with IVF? Here's some hope: A new research report published in October 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, explains how scientists developed a synthetic version of a sperm-originated protein known as PAWP, which induced embryo development in human and mouse eggs similar to the natural triggering of embryo development by the sperm cell during fertilization.

UConn scientists discover how to beat monk parakeets at their own game

In a study published this week in the online journal PeerJ, University of Connecticut researchers announce they have found a way to prevent Monk Parakeets (Myiopsitta monarchus), an invasive species of parrot, from building huge nests that create power outages and public hazards on utility poles by blocking their access to the electric lines that are the gateway to their nest sites.

Tropical Storm Rachel dwarfed by developing system 90E

Tropical Storm Rachel is spinning down west of Mexico's Baja California, and another tropical low pressure area developing off the coast of southwestern Mexico dwarfs the tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed the size difference between the two tropical low pressure areas.

New hypothyroidism treatment guidelines from American Thyroid Association

Levothyroxine (L-T4), long the standard of care for treating hypothyroidism, is effective in most patients, but some individuals do not regain optimal health on L-T4 monotherapy.

Non-citizens face harsher sentencing than citizens in US criminal courts

Non-Americans in the U.S. federal court system are more likely to be sentenced to prison and for longer terms compared to U.S. citizens, according to a new study.

All directions are not created equal for nanoscale heat sources

Thermal considerations are rapidly becoming one of the most serious design constraints in microelectronics, especially on submicron scale lengths.

Novel approach to magnetic measurements atom-by-atom

Having the possibility to measure magnetic properties of materials at atomic precision is one of the important goals of today's experimental physics.

Benzodiazepine sedatives linked to higher rates of mortality compared to propofol

Sedation is frequently required for mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients to reduce anxiety, provide comfort, and assist in providing optimal respiratory support.

Longitudinal report shows challenging reality of ageing with an intellectual disability

A new report launched today by the Intellectual Disability Supplement to TILDA (The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing) conducted by academics from the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, has highlighted the serious, complex and unique health and social challenges facing Ireland's intellectual disability population.

Engineers complete first comprehensive mesh-free numerical simulation of skeletal muscle tissue

Engineers complete first comprehensive mesh-free numerical simulation of skeletal muscle tissue.

A new dimension for integrated circuits: 3-D nanomagnetic logic

Electrical engineers at the Technische Universität München (TUM) have demonstrated a new kind of building block for digital integrated circuits.

Depression increasing across the country

A study by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean M. Twenge shows Americans are more depressed now than they have been in decades.

Blades of grass inspire advance in organic solar cells

Using a bio-mimicking analog of one of nature's most efficient light-harvesting structures, blades of grass, an international research team led by Alejandro Briseno of the University of Massachusetts Amherst has taken a major step in developing long-sought polymer architecture to boost power-conversion efficiency of light to electricity for use in electronic devices.

Comprehensive study of allergic deaths in US finds medications are main culprit

Medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the U.S., according to an analysis of death certificates from 1999 to 2010, conducted by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.

Fat chats: The good, the bad and the ugly comments

Cyberbullying and hurtful 'fat jokes' are disturbingly prevalent in the social media environment, especially on Twitter, says Wen-ying Sylvia Chou of the National Institutes of Health in the US. Chou is lead author of a study in Springer's journal Translational Behavioral Medicine which analyzed well over a million social media posts and comments about weight matters.

Contaminated water linked to pregnancy complications, BU study finds

Prenatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in drinking water may increase the risk of stillbirth and placental abruption, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health researcher.

Effect of topical antibiotics on antibiotic resistance, patient outcomes in ICUs

A comparison of prophylactic antibiotic regimens applied to an area in the mouth and throat and digestive tract were associated with low levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and no differences in patient survival and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, according to a study published in JAMA.

In stickleback fish, dads influence offspring behavior and gene expression

Researchers report that some stickleback fish fathers can have long-term effects on the behavior of their offspring: The most attentive fish dads cause their offspring to behave in a way that makes them less susceptible to predators.

How to predict who will suffer the most from stress

More than 23 per cent of Canadians report being stressed or very stressed on most days. While chronic stress increases the risk of poor mental and physical health, not everyone is affected the same way. Some cope well, but for others - especially those most likely to sweat the small stuff - chronic stress can be harmful.

Antioxidant found in grapes uncorks new targets for acne treatment

Got grapes? UCLA researchers have demonstrated how resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes and found in wine, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne.

UCI study uncovers important process for immune system development

Research by UC Irvine immunologists reveals new information about how our immune system functions, shedding light on a vital process that determines how the body's ability to fight infection develops.

New diagnostic approach for autism in Tanzania

Researchers at Brown University and the University of Georgia have developed and tested an approach for diagnosing autism in Tanzania, where such clinical assessment and intervention services are rare.

Long-acting insulin is safer, more effective for patients with Type 1 diabetes

Long-acting insulin is safer and more effective than intermediate-acting insulin for patients with Type 1 diabetes, according to new research published in the BMJ.

Catching up, but not shooting ahead

Low birth weight children are more vulnerable to environmental influences than infants born with normal weight.

The cultural side of science communication

Do we think of nature as something that we enjoy when we visit a national park and something we need to "preserve?" Or do we think of ourselves as a part of nature? A bird's nest is a part of nature, but what about a house?

Keeping your eyes on the prize can help with exercise, NYU study finds

New research suggests the adage that encourages people to keep their "eyes on the prize" may be on target when it comes to exercise.

Medicaid and Uninsured patients obtain new patient appointments most easily at FQHCs

Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) granted new patient appointments to Medicaid beneficiaries and uninsured patients at higher rates than other primary care practices (non-FQHCs), in addition to charging less for visits, according to results of a new 10-state University of Pennsylvania study published this month in Medical Care.

Study Finds Acupuncture Does Not Improve Chronic Knee Pain

Acupuncture did not provide any benefit in patients older than 50 years with moderate or severe chronic knee pain, according to a new research study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

© 2014 BrightSurf.com