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Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

New protein cleanup factors found to control bacterial growth

Biochemists have long known that crucial cell processes depend on a highly regulated cleanup system known as proteolysis, where specialized proteins called proteases degrade damaged or no-longer-needed proteins.

Mysterious disease may be tied to climate change, says CU Anschutz researcher

A mysterious kidney disease that has killed over 20,000 people in Central America, most of them sugar cane workers, may be caused by chronic, severe dehydration linked to global climate change, according to a new study by Richard J. Johnson, MD, of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Researchers create 'leukemia in a dish' to better study it

Scientists engineered stem cells to better understand the mechanisms behind a form of leukemia caused by changes in a key gene, according to a study led by Mount Sinai researchers and published online today in the journal Cell Reports.

Waste water treatment plants fail to completely eliminate new chemical compounds

The fishing port of Ondarroa, the Deba marina, the estuary at Gernika (beside the discharge stream of the waste water treatment plant) and the industrial ports of Pasaia and Santurtzi are the scenarios where the research was carried out between May and June 2012.

Antioxidants cause malignant melanoma to metastasize faster

Fresh research at Sahlgrenska Academy has found that antioxidants can double the rate of melanoma metastasis in mice.

Study: Fracking industry wells associated with premature birth

Expectant mothers who live near active natural gas wells operated by the fracking industry in Pennsylvania are at an increased risk of giving birth prematurely and for having high-risk pregnancies, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.

Older tobacco users pay more for health insurance under Affordable Care Act

A new study finds tobacco users would pay more for a health insurance plan from the Affordable Care Act exchanges than non-tobacco users in nearly every county of the 37 states that used to sell their plans in 2015.

Unexpected information about Earth's climate history from Yellow River sediment

By meticulously examining sediments in China's Yellow River, a Swedish-Chinese research group are showing that the history of tectonic and climate evolution on Earth may need to be rewritten. Their findings are published today in the highly reputed journal Nature Communications.

Protein research uncovers potential new diagnosis and therapy for breast cancer

Scientists at the University of York, using clinical specimens from charity Breast Cancer Now's Tissue Bank, have conducted new research into a specific sodium channel that indicates the presence of cancer cells and affects tumour growth rates.

Study ties restless legs syndrome to heart, kidney problems

Imagine trying to lie down and rest but feeling an uncontrollable urge to keep moving your legs.

A quantum simulator of impossible physics

The researchers in the two groups have succeeded in getting a trapped atom to imitate behaviours that contradict its own fundamental laws, thus taking elements of science fiction to the microscopic world.

Researchers unlock secrets of troublesome Tribble protein

Scientists from New Zealand and Australia have created the first three-dimensional image of a key protein involved in the development of blood and other cancers.

Researchers create inside-out plants to watch how cellulose forms

Researchers have been able to watch the interior cells of a plant synthesize cellulose for the first time by tricking the cells into growing on the plant's surface.

Researchers gauge heritability of childhood-onset autoimmune diseases

Scientists have calculated more precise measurements of heritability--the influence of underlying genes--in nine autoimmune diseases that begin in childhood.

Wet paleoclimate of Mars revealed by ancient lakes at Gale Crater

We have heard the Mars exploration mantra for more than a decade: follow the water. In a new paper published October 9, 2015, in the journal Science, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) team presents recent results of its quest to not just follow the water but to understand where it came from, and how long it lasted on the surface of Mars so long ago.

Greenland's ice sheet plumbing system revealed

Pioneering new research sheds light on the impact of climate change on subglacial lakes found under the Greenland ice sheet.

Genetic variation is key to fighting viruses

Using a genome-wide association study, EPFL scientists have identified subtle genetic changes that can cause substantial differences to how we fight viral infections.

Bio-inspired robotic finger looks, feels and works like the real thing

Most robotic parts used today are rigid, have a limited range of motion and don't really look lifelike.

Adult high blood pressure risk identifiable in childhood

Groups of people at risk of having high blood pressure and other related health issues by age 38 can be identified in childhood, new research from New Zealand's University of Otago suggests.

Opposites don't attract when learning how to use a prosthesis

New research suggests that upper limb amputees, who typically struggle to learn how to use a new prosthesis, would be more successful if fellow amputees taught them.

Sea turtles face plastic pollution peril

A new global review led by the University of Exeter that set out to investigate the hazards of marine plastic pollution has warned that all seven species of marine turtles can ingest or become entangled in the discarded debris that currently litters the oceans.

Smoking and heavy alcohol use are associated with epigenetic signs of aging

Cigarette smoking and heavy alcohol use cause epigenetic changes to DNA that reflect accelerated biological aging in distinct, measurable ways, according to research presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2015 Annual Meeting in Baltimore.

Professor Janet Hemingway, outlines 15 years of malaria interventions in Africa

In an editorial in the weekly science journal Nature, LSTM's Director, Professor Janet Hemingway, looks at how the last 15 years of control measures have led to massive reductions in disease prevalence in Africa since 2000.

Sex change hormonal treatments alter brain chemistry

Hormonal treatments administered as part of the procedures for sex reassignment have well-known and well-documented effects on the secondary sexual characteristics of the adult body, shifting a recipient's physical appearance to that of the opposite sex.

Beetles provide clues about the genetic foundations of parenthood

A team of researchers including scientists from the University of Georgia has identified many of the genetic changes that take place in burying beetles as they assume the role of parent.

Surgery on melanoma that has spread into abdomen more than doubles patient survival time

Patients with metastatic melanoma who undergo surgery to remove lesions that have spread into the abdomen live more than twice as long as those treated with drug therapy alone, according to novel new research by a North Shore-LIJ Health System cancer surgeon.

Evidence for functional redundancy in nature

One of biology's long-standing puzzles is how so many similar species can co-exist in nature. Do they really all fulfill a different role?

125-million-year-old wing sheds new light on the evolution of flight

Some of the most ancient birds were capable of performing aerodynamic feats in a manner similar to many living birds, according to a new study of the fossil wing of a primitive bird, led by a PhD student at the University of Bristol, UK.

Emergency department CT scans can change physicians' diagnoses and management decisions

A study from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Institute for Technology assessment finds that, after viewing CT scan results, physicians in the emergency departments of four major academic medical centers made key changes in clinical decision-making for patients with symptoms frequently seen in emergency rooms.

Protecting newborn brains using hypothermia

A unique study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles of newborns treated with hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) - a condition that occurs when the brain is deprived of an adequate oxygen supply - confirms its neuroprotective effects on the brain.

Immune gene prevents Parkinson's disease and dementia

An estimated seven to ten million people worldwide are living with Parkinson's disease (PD), which is an incurable and progressive disease of the nervous system affecting movement and cognitive function.

FIGO calls for treatment developed at Wayne State to fight worldwide preterm birth

Recommendations to reduce the rates of preterm birth developed at the Wayne State University School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health's Perinatology Research Branch were introduced as worldwide best practices in maternal-fetal health Thursday during the World Congress of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Vancouver. make ocean conservation work we should keep the noise down

Quiet areas should be sectioned off in the oceans to give us a better picture of the impact human generated noise is having on marine animals, according to a new study published in Marine Pollution Bulletin.

EpiPens save lives but can cut like a knife

Epinephrine autoinjectors can be life-saving for patients experiencing anaphylaxis - a life-threatening emergency - but a new case series published online Tuesday in Annals of Emergency Medicine identifies design features of EpiPens, the most commonly used autoinjector, that appear to be contributing to injuries in children ("Lacerations and Embedded Needles Caused by Epinephrine Autoinjector Use in Children").

NIST, UC Davis scientists float new approach to creating computer memory

What can skyrmions do for you? These ghostly quantum rings, heretofore glimpsed only under extreme laboratory conditions, just might be the basis for a new type of computer memory that never loses its grip on the data it stores.

Living in fear: Mental disorders as risk factors for chronic pain in teenagers

One in four young people have experienced chronic pain and a mental disorder. According to a new report in the Journal of Pain, the onset of pain is often preceded by mental disorders: an above-average rate of incidence of depression, anxiety disorders, and behavioral disorders occurs before the onset of headaches, back pain and neck pain.

Room temperature magnetic skyrmions, a new type of digital memory?

An exotic, swirling object with the sci-fi name of a "magnetic skyrmion" could be the future of nanoelectronics and memory storage.

Molecular characteristics of mammalian melanopsins for non-visual photoreception

Researchers at Institute for Molecular Sciences reported that a mammalian photoreceptive protein melanopsin spontaneously releases the chromophore retinal.

New study suggests hallucinations, alone, do not predict onset of schizophrenia

Despite decades of study, schizophrenia has remained stubbornly difficult to diagnose in its earliest stage - between the appearance of symptoms and the development of the disorder.

A multilaminar model explains the structure of chromosomal aberrations in cancer cells

During cell division, each metaphase chromosome contains a single enormously long DNA molecule that is associated with histone proteins and forms a long chromatin filament with many nucleosomes.

Menopause diminishes impact of good cholesterol

What has previously been known as good cholesterol--high density lipoprotein (HDL)--has now been shown to be not so good in protecting women against atherosclerosis while they are transitioning through menopause.

Poor infant sleep may predict problematic toddler behavior

Temper tantrums and misbehavior, restlessness and inattention are the trappings of the typical toddler. But they may also be signs of developmental delays or disorders. Are infant sleep irregularities red flags for later developmental difficulties?

Popular crime shows may help reduce sexual assault

A new study reveals viewers of "Law and Order" have a better grasp of sexual consent than viewers of other crime dramas such as "CSI" or "NCIS," suggesting that individuals who watch programs in which sexual predators are punished may avoid sexual predatory behavior in real life.

Unexpected connections: Calcium refill mechanisms in nerve cells affects gene expression

Calcium is not just required for strong bones - it is an essential requirement for muscle and nerve cells to work normally.

Learning from the MDGs: Improved sanitation and drainage in cities

World leaders have agreed on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), but arguably Goal six - the water and sanitation goal - will have the hardest job building on the work undertaken by the previous Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers reveal type of vaginal bacteria that protects women from HIV

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have identified a type of vaginal bacteria within the mucus of the female reproductive system that can protect women from HIV as well as other sexually transmitted infections.

Common gene variant linked to chromosome errors and early pregnancy loss

Researchers have identified a common genetic variant strongly associated with chromosome gains and losses during the early stages of human embryonic development.

Long-term opioid therapy relieves chronic pain in only 20 percent of women

Women, and especially younger women, are much less likely than men to have good relief of chronic, non-cancer pain with long-term opioid use, with only one in five women reporting low levels of pain and high levels of function with chronic opioid therapy in a new study published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers .

Study sheds light on protecting transgender individuals from suicide

The likelihood of a transgender person attempting suicide is very high, often because of the prejudice, transphobia and other stressors he or she may experience.

Surgeons restore hand, arm movement to quadriplegic patients

A pioneering surgical technique has restored some hand and arm movement to patients immobilized by spinal cord injuries in the neck, reports a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Using optical fiber to generate a two-micron laser

In recent years, two-micron lasers (0.002 millimetre) have been of growing interest among researchers. In the areas of surgery and molecule detection, for example, they offer significant advantages compared to traditional, shorter-wavelength lasers.

D&R: A new adipogenic cocktail that produces functional adipocytes from MSCs

Adipocyte dysfunction is directly associated with pathologies characterized by metabolic disorders including obesity, diabetes mellitus type II and metabolic syndrome. Adipogenesis is a complex process that has been extensively studied in different cell models.

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