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Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Global decline of large herbivores may lead to an 'empty landscape'

The decline of the world's large herbivores, especially in Africa and parts of Asia, is raising the specter of an "empty landscape" in some of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet, according to a newly published study.




Exposure to air pollution in the first year of life increases risk for allergies

New research from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study shows that exposure to outdoor air pollution during the first year of life increases the risk of developing allergies to food, mould, pets and pests.

TGen-UCSF study in Neuro-Oncology provides comprehensive look at brain cancer treatments

Led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and UC San Francisco (UCSF), a comprehensive genetic review of treatment strategies for glioblastoma brain tumors was published today in the Oxford University Press journal Neuro-Oncology.

US clinics avoiding government oversight of 'stem cell' treatments

Clinics across the United States are advertising stem cell treatments that attempt to take advantage of what they perceive as exceptions in FDA regulations, according to bioethicist Leigh G. Turner, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Minnesota Center for Bioethics and School of Public Health.

Low-allergen soybean could have high impact

In the United States, nearly 15 million people and 1 in 13 children suffer from food allergy. In Arizona alone, every classroom contains at least two children with a food allergy.

Ocean fronts improve climate and fishery production, study finds

A recent study by the University of Georgia found that ocean fronts--separate regions of warm and cool water as well as salt and fresh water -- act to increase production in the ocean.

Study: Generic transplant drugs as good as brand name

A University of Cincinnati (UC)-led research team has found that generic formulations of tacrolimus, a drug used post-transplant to lower the risk of organ rejection, are just as good as the name-brand version.

Proteomics identifies DNA repair toolbox

During each cell division, more than 3.3 billion base pairs of genomic DNA have to be duplicated and segregated accurately to daughter cells.

Long-term galactic cosmic ray exposure leads to dementia-like cognitive impairments

What happens to an astronaut's brain during a mission to Mars? Nothing good. It's besieged by destructive particles that can forever impair cognition, according to a UC Irvine radiation oncology study appearing in the May 1 edition of Science Advances.

How to reset a diseased cell

In proof-of-concept experiments, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine demonstrate the ability to tune medically relevant cell behaviors by manipulating a key hub in cell communication networks.

Mixing energy drinks, alcohol tied to abusive drinking in teens

Expanding what we know about college students mixing alcohol with energy drinks, investigators from Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center found teens aged 15-17 years old who had ever mixed alcohol with energy drinks were four times more likely to meet the criteria for alcohol use disorder than a teen who has tried alcohol but never mixed it with an energy drink.

From brittle to plastic in 1 breath

What if peanut brittle, under certain conditions, behaved like taffy? Something like that happens to a two-dimensional dichalcogenide analyzed by scientists at Rice University.

Insight into how we protect ourselves from certain bacteria and fungi

Australian scientists have shown that a specific gene determines the development and function of important cells that bridge the gap between our fast-acting 'innate', and slower-acting 'adaptive', immune systems.

Study illustrates how chickenpox virus can cause a stroke in an HIV patient

Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can, in rare cases, experience bleeding on the brain that causes a type of stroke called intracerebral hemorrhage.

Study reveals how a Rab protein controls HIV-1 replication

HIV-1 replication requires the coordinated movement of the virus's components toward the plasma membrane of an immune cell, where the virions are assembled and ultimately released.

Identifying species imperiled by the wildlife trade may require a trip to the market

Scientists, conservationists and governments could have a new weapon in their struggle to gauge -- and halt -- the devastation of the wildlife trade on populations of prized animals: the very markets where the animals are bought and sold.

ORNL researchers probe chemistry, topography and mechanics with one instrument

The probe of an atomic force microscope (AFM) scans a surface to reveal details at a resolution 1,000 times greater than that of an optical microscope.

First-year undergrad identifies method to potentially save money in health care

When the 2012 presidential election heightened focus on healthcare reform, Pranav Puri's interest in politics called his attention to a major development at his hometown hospital.

Malarial parasites dodge the kill

Scientists have uncovered a potential mode of parasite drug resistance in malaria infection, according to a report published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Disney Research algorithm combines videos from unstructured camera arrays into panoramas

Even non-professionals may someday be able to create high-quality video panoramas using multiple cameras with the help of an algorithm developed by a team of Disney researchers.

Discovered the sixth DNA base?

DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is the main component of our genetic material. It is formed by combining four parts: A, C, G and T (adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine), called bases of DNA combine in thousands of possible sequences to provide the genetic variability that enables the wealth of aspects and functions of living beings.

Mutations in 2 genes linked to familial pulmonary fibrosis and telomere shortening

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified mutations in two genes that cause a fatal lung scarring disease known as familial pulmonary fibrosis.

Rheumatoid arthritis patients at increased risk of surprise heart attack

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of a surprise heart attack, according to new research presented today at ICNC 12 by Dr Adriana Puente, a cardiologist in the National Medical Centre "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE in Mexico City, Mexico.

Ocean currents disturb methane-eating bacteria

Offshore the Svalbard archipelago, methane gas is seeping out of the seabed at the depths of several hundred meters.

New test predicts sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

A new test has been developed to predict sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients in whom such forecasts were previously impossible.

Hot under the collar: The untold dangers firefighters face in the line of duty

What do you think is the biggest cause of death for firefighters on duty? Well if your first thought was burns or smoke inhalation you'd be wrong!

Inanimate beads behave in lifelike ways

Scientists have created microbe-sized beads that can utilize energy in the environment to self-propel upstream by purely physical means.

Patients with gastrointestinal tumors at higher risk of other cancers

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine conducted the first population-based study that characterizes the association and temporal relationship between gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and other cancers.

'Performance enhancing' drugs decrease performance

Doping is damaging the image of sport without benefitting athletes' results, according to University of Adelaide research.

UH researchers create lens to turn smartphone into microscope

Researchers at the University of Houston have created an optical lens that can be placed on an inexpensive smartphone to magnify images by a magnitude of 120, all for just 3 cents a lens.

Rumors have it

Bad news, fans of rational political discourse: A study by an MIT researcher shows that attempts to debunk political rumors may only reinforce their strength.

Warm oceans caused hottest Dust Bowl years in 1934/36

Two ocean hot spots have been found to be the potential drivers of the hottest summers on record for the Central US in 1934 and 1936.

Lousy sockeye are lousy competitors

With major funding from several groups, including NSERC, an SFU doctoral student has made a key discovery regarding Fraser River sockeye's vulnerability to sea lice.

NIH-funded study points way forward for retinal disease gene therapy

Gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), an inherited disorder that causes vision loss starting in childhood, improved patients' eyesight and the sensitivity of the retina within weeks of treatment.

Gene therapy efficacy for LCA: Improvement is followed by decline in vision

Gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), an inherited disorder that causes loss of night- and day-vision starting in childhood, improved patients' eyesight within weeks of treatment in a clinical trial of 15 children and adults at the Scheie Eye Institute at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Keeping legalized marijuana out of hands of kids

As the realities of legalized marijuana take hold in four states and the District of Columbia, legislators and regulators could learn a lot from the successes -- and failures -- of the tobacco and alcohol industries in keeping their harmful products out of the hands of children and adolescents.

Pollen and clouds: April flowers bring May showers?

The main job of pollen is to help seed the next generation of trees and plants, but a new study from the University of Michigan and Texas A&M shows that the grains might also seed clouds.

Good things in store for retailers

Shopping online or in catalogs is great for many reasons: to while away time on a snowy day; to avoid the holiday crush at the local mall; to do ultra-efficient comparison shopping; to enjoy a world of choice at your fingertips.

Parent training reduces serious behavioral problems in children with autism

Young children with autism spectrum disorder, who also have serious behavioral problems, showed improved behavior when their parents were trained with specific, structured strategies to manage tantrums, aggression, self-injury, and non-compliance.

The language of invention: Most innovations are rephrasings of past technologies

Most new patents are combinations of existing ideas and pretty much always have been, even as the stream of fundamentally new core technologies has slowed, according to a new paper in the Journal of the Roayl Society Interface by Santa Fe Institute researchers Hyejin Youn, Luis Bettencourt, Jose Lobo, and Deborah Strumsky.

Established a psychological technique to helps smokers quite tobacco

An international research project led by scientists from the U. of Granada has demonstrated that motivational interviewing can make smokers see tobacco as something disagreeable, thus helping them to quit the habit.

The future is now: Reining in procrastination

Procrastination is the thief of time that derails New Year's resolutions and delays saving for college or retirement, but researchers have found a way to collar it.

New gold standard established for open and reproducible research

A group of Cambridge computer scientists have set a new gold standard for openness and reproducibility in research by sharing the more than 200GB of data and 20,000 lines of code behind their latest results - an unprecedented degree of openness in a peer-reviewed publication.

Study shows where damaged DNA goes for repair

A Tufts University study sheds new light on the process by which DNA repair occurs within the cell. In research published in the May 15 edition of the journal Genes & Development and available May 4 online in advance of print, Tufts University biologist Catherine Freudenreich and her co-authors show that expanded repeats of the CAG/CTG trinucleotide (CAG) in yeast shift to the periphery of the cell nucleus for repair.

New study suggests prominent role for pharmacies in reducing asthma-related illness

A new study shows how pharmacies might collaborate with physicians and families to reduce asthma-related illness.

Patients with AIDS at increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration

Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have a four-fold increase in their risk of developing intermediate-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) compared to people of the same age who are not infected with HIV.

A feel for flight: How bats are teaching scientists to build better aircraft

Bats are masters of flight in the night sky, capable of steep nosedives and sharp turns that put our best aircrafts to shame.

School reform in post-Katrina New Orleans harmful to black community, scholars say

By most media accounts, education reform in post-Katrina New Orleans is a success. Test scores and graduation rates are up, and students once trapped in failing schools have their choice of charter schools throughout the city.

The random raman laser: A new light source for the microcosmos

In modern microscope imaging techniques, lasers are used as light sources because they can deliver fast pulsed and extremely high-intensity radiation to a target, allowing for rapid image acquisition.

Study finds housing market cycles have become longer

A statistical analysis of data from 20 industrial countries covering the period 1970 to 2012 suggests housing market pricing cycles -- normal, boom and bust phases -- have become longer over the last four decades.

Young people think friends are more at risk of cyberbullying

Young people are aware of the risks of cyberbullying but perceive others as being more at risk than themselves. Young women are more vulnerable to this perception than young men.

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