Science Current Events | Science News | Brightsurf.com
 
Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Brain formation pattern shows why early trauma may leave no clues

Some of the earliest nerve cells to develop in the womb shape brain circuits that process sights and sounds, but then give way to mature networks that convert this sensory information into thoughts.




Hepatitis virus-like particles as potential cancer treatment

UC Davis researchers have developed a way to use the empty shell of a Hepatitis E virus to carry vaccines or drugs into the body. The technique has been tested in rodents as a way to target breast cancer, and is available for commercial licensing through UC Davis Office of Research.

Whooping cough booster vouchers don't boost immunization rates of caregivers

Cases of pertussis (whooping cough) have increased dramatically over the past five years, putting infants at risk of serious illness or death.

Anonymous browsing hinders online dating signals

Big data and the growing popularity of online dating sites may be reshaping a fundamental human activity: finding a mate, or at least a date. Yet a new study in Management Science finds that certain longstanding social norms persist, even online.

In the Southern Ocean, a carbon-dioxide mystery comes clear

Twenty thousand years ago, when humans were still nomadic hunters and gatherers, low concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere allowed the earth to fall into the grip of an ice age. But despite decades of research, the reasons why levels of the greenhouse gas were so low then have been difficult to piece together.

Breaking through insect shells at a molecular level

With their chitinous shells, insects seem almost invulnerable - but like Achilles' heel in Greek mythology, their impressive armor can still be attacked.

Study reveals how herpes virus tricks the immune system

With over half the U.S. population infected, most people are familiar with the pesky cold sore outbreaks caused by the herpes virus.

Mitochondria shown to trigger cell aging

An international team of scientists has for the first time shown that mitochondria, the batteries of the cells, are essential for ageing.

Use of and barriers to access to opioid analgesics worldwide

Use of common opioid painkillers such as codeine, morphine and oxycodone has more than quadrupled in Australia over the past decade and doubled worldwide over the same period a report published today in The Lancet (3rd February 2016) by the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) reveals.

Helping turn waste heat into electricity

At the atomic level, bismuth displays a number of quirky physical phenomena. A new study reveals a novel mechanism for controlling the energy transfer between electrons and the bismuth crystal lattice.

Ready for the high seas?

Seagrass is the quiet achiever. The bundles of foliage often found washed up on beaches come from one of the most productive members of the plant kingdom.

Modern microbial ecosystems provide window to early life on Earth

New research from a University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led science team provides new insight into one of the world's most diverse and extensive ecosystems of living microbes.

Examining how terrestrial life's building blocks may have first formed

How did life begin? This is one of the most fundamental questions scientists puzzle over. To address it, they have to look not just back to the primordial Earth, but out into space. Now, scientists propose in the Journal of the American Chemical Society a new set of cosmic chemical reactions that could have contributed to the formation of life on our planet.

On the origin of Eukaryotes -- when cells got complex

Just as physicists comprehend the origin of the universe by observing the stars and archeologists reconstruct ancient civilizations with the artifacts found today, evolutionary biologists study the diversity of modern-day species to understand the origin of life and evolution.

Antarctic study identifies melting ice sheet's role in sea level rise

Loss of ice in Antarctica caused by a warming ocean could raise global sea levels by three metres, research suggests.

Energy from cellphone towers amplify pain in amputees, UT Dallas study finds

For years, retired Maj. David Underwood has noticed that whenever he drove under power lines and around other electromagnetic fields, he would feel a buzz in what remained of his arm. When traveling by car through Texas' open spaces, the buzz often became more powerful.

Meditation eases pain, anxiety and fatigue during breast cancer biopsy

Meditation eases anxiety, fatigue and pain for women undergoing breast cancer biopsies, according to researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute. They also found that music is effective, but to a lesser extent.

Preventive surgery for women at high risk of breast and ovarian cancer

In a review article published in the Feb. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, a pair of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center researchers provide an in-depth look at the issues associated with the care of women in families with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome who have not yet developed cancer themselves.

Cause for hope: Secondary tropical forests put on weight fast

How fast tropical forests recover after deforestation has major consequences for climate change mitigation. A team including Smithsonian scientists discovered that some secondary tropical forests recover biomass quickly: half of the forests in the study attained 90 percent of old-growth forest levels in 66 years or less.

Potential new approaches to treating eye diseases

Potential new approaches to treating eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are described in a new study, "IL-33 amplifies an innate immune response in the degenerating retina," in the February Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Study shows association among childhood ADHD, sex and obesity

The incidence of childhood and adult obesity has increased significantly over the past three decades. New research shows that there is an association between obesity development during adulthood and childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Mayo Clinic researchers led the multi-site study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

New study challenges Jupiter's role as planetary shield, protecting Earth from comet impacts

Not only is the "Jupiter as shield" concept, implying that the planet shields Earth from comet impacts, not true, but perhaps Jupiter's most important role in fostering the development of life on Earth was just the opposite -- delivering the volatile materials from the outer Solar System needed for life to form.

Financial industry coping with issues of elder exploitation, cognitive decline

Protecting the wealth of older adults should be a high priority for banks, insurance companies, and others, according to the latest edition of Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR).

Breakthrough in generating embryonic cells that are critical for human health

Neural crest cells arise early in the development of vertebrates, migrate extensively through the embryo, and differentiate to give rise to a wide array of diverse derivatives.

A fast solidification process makes material crackle

Researchers from the Centre of Excellence in Computational Nanoscience at Aalto University and their colleagues at Brown University and the University of California, Irvine, have developed a theory that answers this question by combining for the first time the understanding of vibrations in solid material and the solidification of liquid at a microscopic level.

Head injury patients develop brain clumps associated with Alzheimer's disease

Scientists have revealed that protein clumps associated with Alzheimer's disease are also found in the brains of people who have had a head injury.

Anxiety disorder 3 times more likely among older adults with COPD

The prevalence of past-year generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) for adults aged 50 and older with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is much higher compared to older adults without COPD (5.8% vs 1.7%), according to a new study published by University of Toronto researchers.

Galactic center's gamma rays unlikely to originate from dark matter, evidence shows

Bursts of gamma rays from the center of our galaxy are not likely to be signals of dark matter but rather other astrophysical phenomena such as fast-rotating stars called millisecond pulsars, according to two new studies, one from a team based at Princeton University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and another based in the Netherlands.

Clinical investigations of MRT are 'ethically permissible' if conditions met

Conducting clinical investigations of mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRT) in humans is ethically permissible as long as significant conditions and principles are met, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Smithsonian scientists discover butterfly-like fossil insect in the deep Mesozoic

Large butterfly-like insects known as Kalligrammatid lacewings, which fluttered through Eurasian fern- and cycad-filled woodland during the Mesozoic Era, have been extinct for more than 120 million years.

Improvised naloxone nasal sprays lack evidence of absorption and effect

Naloxone hydrochloride is a medication that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. First responders (peers, family, police, etc.) may prefer nasal sprays to injectable naloxone, which has led to widespread use of improvised naloxone kits with atomisers for nasal delivery of the drug.

Researchers uncover new piece of the HIV puzzle

A research project headed by Henrik Kloeverpris, a postdoc at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology at the University of Copenhagen, shows that the so-called ILCs (innate lymphoid cells) - a component of the immune system crucial to maintaining immune system balance - are destroyed in patients infected with HIV.

Consistency of Earth's magnetic field history surprises scientists

Earth's magnetic field is generated by the motion of liquid iron in the planet's core. This "geodynamo" occasionally reverses its polarity--the magnetic north and south poles swap places.

Scientists discover how plants tailor growth to the seasons

Dmitri A. Nusinow, Ph.D., assistant member at the Danforth Plant Science Center and researchers in his lab studying plants' circadian clock have discovered a gene that allows plants to remember daylight during the long nights of winter, helping them tailor their growth appropriately to the seasons.

Obesity and weight gain in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy: What's the harm?

The percentage of HIV-infected adults who were obese-body mass index >30 kg/m2-when they began antiretroviral therapy (ART) doubled over a 12-year period.

A violent wind blown from the heart of a galaxy tells the tale of a merger

An international team led by a researcher from Hiroshima University has succeeded in revealing the detailed structure of a massive ionized gas outflow streaming from the starburst galaxy NGC 6240.

Using steroids before late preterm delivery reduces neonatal respiratory problems

A multicenter clinical trial led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian has found that the use of corticosteroids in mothers at risk for late preterm delivery significantly reduced the incidence of severe respiratory complications in their babies.

Parental depression negatively affects children's school performance

A new study has found that when parents are diagnosed with depression, it can have a significant negative impact on their children's performance at school.

Emergency blood transfusions for major trauma need to be more rapid and consistent

Only two per cent of patients with life-threatening bleeding after serious injury receive optimal blood transfusion therapy in England and Wales, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and NHS Blood and Transplant.

'How much does it hurt?' For preschoolers, cognitive development can limit ability to rate pain

"Rate your pain on a scale of zero to ten"--for most adults and older children, it's a simple concept. But preschool-aged children generally lack the cognitive skills needed to make reliable pain ratings, according to an article in PAINĀ®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP).

Phosphine as a superconductor? Sure, but the story may be complicated

Phosphine is one of the newest materials to be named a superconductor, a material through which electricity can flow with zero resistance.

Cochrane news: Have national smoking bans worked in reducing harms in passive smoking?

The most robust evidence yet, published today in the Cochrane Library, suggests that national smoking legislation does reduce the harms of passive smoking, and particularly risks from heart disease.

NIH scientists discover genetic cause of rare allergy to vibration

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have identified a genetic mutation responsible for a rare form of inherited hives induced by vibration, also known as vibratory urticaria.

Connective tissue disease increases risk for cardiovascular problems

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death.

Early poverty disrupts link between hunger and eating

How much you eat when you're not really hungry may depend on how well off your family was when you were a child, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Discovery of the specific properties of graphite-based carbon materials

University of Tsukuba Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences Associate Professor Takahiro Kondo and Professor Junji Nakamura, in cooperation with Researcher Donghui Guo and Professor Susumu Okada of the same faculty, have shown from detailed measurements that in atomically flat areas of a nitrogen-doped graphite surface in the absence of external magnetic fields, Landau levels manifest corresponding to super strong magnetic fields of approximately 100 tesla across bilayer graphene.

To prevent infection after C-section, chlorhexidine better than iodine

Women undergo more cesarean sections each year in the United States than any other major surgery, with the procedure carrying a significant rate of infection at the incision site.

Researchers discover new phase of boron nitride and a new way to create pure c-BN

Researchers at North Carolina State University have discovered a new phase of the material boron nitride (Q-BN), which has potential applications for both manufacturing tools and electronic displays.

Organic crystals allow creating flexible electronic devices

Scientists from the Faculty of Physics of the Moscow State University have grown organic semiconductor crystals which can reduce the cost of the process of creating light, flexible and transparent light-emitting electronic devices of the new generation.

Receptors inside nerve cells may be a key to controlling pain

In real estate, location is key. It now seems the same concept holds true when it comes to stopping pain.

Investigating potential fetal exposure to antidepressants

Depression is a serious issue for expecting mothers. Left untreated, depression could have implications for a fetus's health.

The seawater temperature distribution in tropics affects the rainfall in East Asia

A wide swatch of Asia, from the tropics to the mid-latitudes, which has wet and dry seasons, is significantly affected by "Asian monsoons."

Why is calcific tendinitis so painful?

Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, typically characterized by calcium deposits on the rotator cuff, is an extremely painful condition that can severely impair movement and life quality.

Nasal polyps can be treated with medicine dupilumab

Based on endoscopic findings, the condition can be divided into chronic sinusitis with or without nasal polyps.

© 2016 BrightSurf.com