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Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Secondary tropical forests absorb carbon at higher rate than old-growth forests

At the climate talks in Paris, all attention was focused on how humanity can reduce climate change by reducing carbon emissions, or by increasing carbon uptake.




How stable is the West Antarctic Ice Sheet?

A future warming of the Southern Ocean caused by rising greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere may severely disrupt the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

Researchers find new cause of strong earthquakes

A geologic event known as diking can cause strong earthquakes -- with a magnitude between 6 and 7, according to an international research team.

Making sense of metallic glass

If you freeze any liquid fast enough, even liquid metal, it becomes a glass. Vitrified metals, or metallic glasses, are at the frontier of materials science research.

Claims for solar cell efficiency put to test at NREL

The sheet of paper taped to the door of Keith Emery's office tells the story. On the paper is a simple fever chart showing the improvements made in increasing the efficiency of two dozen types of solar cells. Some of the lines marking record efficiencies date to the mid-1970s.

Is it possible for humans to regenerate limbs?

Unlocking the complex biological and regenerative processes that would enable humans to regrow digits and limbs "would radically change the prognosis and quality of life for amputees," state the authors of "Looking Ahead to Engineering Epimorphic Regeneration of a Human Digit or Limb," a Review article published in Tissue Engineering, Part B, Reviews, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

NREL explains the higher cellulolytic activity of a vital microorganism

Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) say better understanding of a bacterium could lead to cheaper production of cellulosic ethanol and other advanced biofuels.

Predicting who will develop multiple sclerosis

A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) has launched a study of individuals at risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). By focusing on first-degree family members of MS patients, the research team seeks to better understand the sequence of events that leads some people to develop the disease.

Artistic space odyssey to broadcast people's messages to the stars

Messages from around the world are to be beamed into space at the speed of light as part of a cultural project to create a celestial time capsule.

No genetic link between smaller subcortical brain volumes and risk for schizophrenia

There is no evidence of genetic overlap between risk for schizophrenia and brain volume measures, according to researchers in a global study that examined the genes that drive the development of schizophrenia.

Wbp2 is a novel gene implicated in deafness

Researchers at King's College London and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in the United Kingdom have for the first time demonstrated a direct link between the Wbp2 gene and progressive hearing loss.

Brain scars in multiple sclerosis patients reveal possible cause of taste problems

Taste deficits appear to be more prevalent among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients than previously reported and correlate with brain lesions left by the debilitating disease, a new study from the University of Pennsylvania's Smell and Taste Center and the department of Radiology found.

Mayo researchers identify new Borrelia species that causes Lyme disease

Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and health officials from Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, have discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease in people.

A long, hot view: Climate change likely to extend across next 10,000 years

The damaging climate consequences of carbon emissions will grow and persist for millennia without a dramatic new global energy strategy, according to a new set of research-based climate change scenarios developed by an international team of scientists.

Researchers identify most dangerous strains of often-deadly bacteria

A multi-disciplinary group of researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) have for the first time determined the genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli, which every year kills hundreds of thousands of people around the world.

Research shows weight loss and improved cholesterol levels with walnut-rich diet

A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that a diet containing unsaturated fats, such as those found in walnuts and olive oil, has similar weight loss effects as a lower fat, higher-carbohydrate diet.

Oral capsule with bacterial spores may be effective treatment for recurrent C. difficile

Results from a Phase 1b/2 trial suggest that an investigational microbiome-based, oral therapeutic drug is effective for the treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection. In a paper published online in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, a multi-institutional research team reports that treatment with the preparation, containing the spores of approximately 50 species of beneficial bacteria, successfully prevented recurrence of C. difficile infection (CDI) in patients with a history of multiple recurrent disease.

Non-motor microtubule-associated protein in maintaining synaptic plasticity

NMDA glutamate receptors, which function as receptors that bond with glutamates, are known to be deeply involved in animal memory and learning.

Nanoscale cavity strongly links quantum particles

Scientists have created a crystal structure that boosts the interaction between tiny bursts of light and individual electrons, an advance that could be a significant step toward establishing quantum networks in the future.

Researchers create synthetic biopathway to turn agriculture waste into 'green' products

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have engineered a new synthetic biopathway that can more efficiently and cost-effectively turn agricultural waste, like corn stover and orange peels, into a variety of useful products ranging from spandex to chicken feed.

Scientists elucidate genetic underpinnings of congenital heart disease

Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect and the leading cause of all infant deaths in the United States.

Duplicate DNA a hallmark of tick genome

Researchers have sequenced the genetic blueprint of one of the most prolific pathogen-transmitting agents on the planet - the Lyme-disease-spreading tick (Ixodes scapularis) that bites humans.

Exposure to air pollution 30 years ago associated with increased risk of death

The new report comes from one of the world's longest running air pollution studies, which included 368,000 people in England and Wales followed over a 38 year period.

Study accurately dates coral loss at Great Barrier Reef

The timing of significant Great Barrier Reef coral loss captured by a series of historical photos has been accurately determined for the first time by a University of Queensland)-led study.

Researchers resolve longstanding issue of components needed to regenerate muscle

Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Research Institute (SBP) have conclusively identified the protein complex that controls the genes needed to repair skeletal muscle.

Nanoparticle therapy that uses LDL and fish oil kills liver cancer cells

An experimental nanoparticle therapy that combines low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and fish oil preferentially kills primary liver cancer cells without harming healthy cells, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report.

Some heart drugs and antibiotics show effective in fighting cancer

North American researchers have identified drugs that showed promising perspectives in treating cancers, according to a recent study published in Cancer Research.

Sustained aerobic exercise increases adult neurogenesis in the brain

It may be possible to increase the neuron reserve of the hippocampus - and thus improve preconditions for learning - by promoting neurogenesis via sustained aerobic exercise such as running.

Double dose of bad earthquake news

A team of researchers, including one from the University of California, Riverside, has discovered that earthquake ruptures can jump much further than previously thought, a finding that could have severe implications on the Los Angeles area and other regions in the world.

Study shows promising safety results for anti-aging drug

The search for the fountain of youth led to a 2009 discovery that a drug called rapamycin was shown to extend the lifespan of mice.

New target, potential treatment found for unhealthy levels of fat that can occur in type 1 diabetes

Researchers have new insight into the complex interchange that can raise blood levels of unhealthy lipids, or fat, in type 1 diabetes, and early evidence that a drug under study to block cancer cell growth can restore healthier levels.

Researchers find that antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV in the female reproductive tract

For the first time, investigators in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have determined how antiretroviral therapy (ART) affects the way HIV disseminates and establishes infection in the female reproductive tract.

Nasoalveolar molding use for cleft lip and palate reduces number of surgeries, cost of care

Patients with complete unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate (U/BCLP) who were treated with nasoalveolar molding (NAM) required fewer surgeries and a reduction in overall healthcare costs compared to similar patients who did not have NAM treatment, according to a study in The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, authored by Parit A. Patel, MD.

The herbivore dilemma: How corn plants fights off simultaneous attacks

Corn seedlings are especially susceptible to hungry insect herbivores, such as caterpillars and aphids, because they lack woody stems and tough leaves. So what's a tender, young corn plant to do?

Cocaine users present alterations in the function and structures of the brain

In the study cocaine users performed a gambling task while measurements were being taken of their brain activity.

Oregano may reduce methane in cow burps

It may sound pretty harmless, but methane emissions from cows are a large problem for the climate.

Earth-like planets have Earth-like interiors

Every school kid learns the basic structure of the Earth: a thin outer crust, a thick mantle, and a Mars-sized core.

Protein that limits the severity of genetic kidney disease found

Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan have identified a protein that limits the severity of Alport syndrome, a type of genetic kidney disease.

Diabetes drug shown to help body rebuild after heart attack

New light has been shed on how a common diabetes drug can be used to aid recovery from a heart attack.

New type 2 diabetes biomarker identified

Researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) have found an epigenetic mechanism implicated in the regulation of blood sugar.

A fifth of car fuel-efficiency savings are eroded by increased driving

Around a fifth of the energy-saving benefits of fuel-efficient cars are eroded because people end up driving them more, according to a study into British motoring habits over the last 40 years.

Graphene decharging and molecular shielding

Joint theoretical and experimental study suggested that graphene sheets efficiently shield chemical interactions.

More detailed analysis of how cells react to stress

When cells are exposed to stress, different repair and detoxification mechanisms are triggered to protect the cells from being damaged.

National underutilization of preemptive and early kidney transplants

A kidney transplant is a life-changing and life-saving procedure. Yet, a new study conducted by Mayo Clinic and the University of Michigan shows that only one-third of patients who ultimately receive a living donor kidney transplant receive it pre-emptively (i.e., before starting dialysis).

Allergy shots effective for baby boomers suffering from seasonal allergies

Recent years have seen an increase in those suffering from allergies, including baby boomers. And because older people tend to have additional chronic diseases, diagnosis and management of allergic rhinitis (hay fever) can be a challenge.

Tick genome reveals inner workings of a resilient blood-guzzler

An international team of scientists led by Purdue University has sequenced the genome of the tick that transmits Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne illness in North America.

Body temperature triggers newly developed polymer to change shape

Polymers that visibly change shape when exposed to temperature changes are nothing new. But a research team led by Chemical Engineering Professor Mitch Anthamatten at the University of Rochester created a material that undergoes a shape change that can be triggered by body heat alone, opening the door for new medical and other applications.

Evidence of a lipid link in the inherited form of Alzheimer's disease

Australian researchers have found biochemical changes occurring in the blood, in the rare inherited form of Alzheimer's disease.

The mechanism of maintaining cell polarity visualized by super-resolution microscope

Cells are not uniform spheres; they generally come in a variety of disparate shapes. In the broadest sense, this variation in shapes is known as cell polarity, and it is an essential property for a variety of cell functions.

No more hippy trail routes as backpackers become tourists

Low cost airlines, natural disasters, regional competition, tightening visa rules and terrorism have all changed backpacking in South East Asia.

Air pollution exposure during pregnancy linked with asthma risk

Babies born to mothers exposed to air pollution from traffic during pregnancy have an increased risk of developing asthma before the age of six, according to new UBC research.

Air pollution exposure during pregnancy linked with asthma risk

Babies born to mothers exposed to air pollution from traffic sources during pregnancy have an increased risk of developing asthma before the age of 5 years, according to new findings.

Millennials say one thing but do another when choosing chocolate, study finds

The majority of millennials may not be putting their money where their mouths are when selecting chocolate, according to a Kansas State University expert in psychological sciences.

Patients with PTSD together with sleep apnea may have reduced quality of life

New research finds patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) experienced lower quality of life, more sleepiness, and less adherence and response to positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy.

Newer pain management strategies can lead to quicker, shorter recovery after TKRs

According to a new literature review in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS), a team-based care approach (consisting of the patient, family members, the orthopaedic surgeon and other medical practitioners) on total knee replacement (TKR) procedures, in conjunction with newer pain management strategies, is key to maximizing patient outcomes.

Ghost imaging in the time domain could revolutionize disturbance-sensitive signal imaging

Research results recently presented in the distinguished Nature Photonics journal open up new outlooks on ghost imaging in the time domain.

New evidence gives women informed choice in the prolapse surgery debate

New evidence published today highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh when compared with tissue repair in the surgical treatment of vaginal prolapse.

Scientists create laser-activated superconductor

Shining lasers at superconductors can make them work at higher temperatures, suggests new findings from an international team of scientists including the University of Bath.

A disposable, highly sensitive biosensing system

We are pleased to announce that a new biosensing platform has been fabricated for the determination of Haptoglobin in human blood.

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