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Science current events and breaking science news on health, climate change, nanotechnology, the environment, stem cells, global warming, current cancer research, physics, biology, computer science, astronomy, endangered species and alternative energy.

Small algae with great potential

The single most important calcifying algae of the world's oceans is able to simultaneously adapt to rising water temperatures and ocean acidification through evolution.




IU study: Combining epilepsy drug, morphine can result in less pain, lower opioid doses

Adding a common epilepsy drug to a morphine regimen can result in better pain control with fewer side effects. Moreover, the combination can reduce the dosage of the opioid needed to be effective, according to a team of pain researchers at Indiana University.

Certain Form of Baldness at Age 45 Linked to Higher Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

A new, large cohort analysis from the prospective Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, indicates that men who had moderate baldness affecting both the front and the crown of their head at age 45 were at a 40% increased risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer (usually indicates a faster growing tumor resulting in poorer prognosis relative to non-aggressive prostate cancer) later in life, compared to men with no baldness.

More cheese, please! News study shows dairy is good for metabolic health

Dairy is considered part of a healthy diet and dietary guidelines recommend the daily consumption of 2-4 portions of milk-based products such as milk, yogurt, cheese, cream and butter.

Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene

Neuroscientists have found that a gene mutation that arose more than half a million years ago may be key to humans' unique ability to produce and understand speech.

What's for dinner? Rapidly identifying undescribed species in a commercial fungi packet

For lovers of wild foods, autumn harks a season of bounty. Fungi of dizzying variety erupt from wood and soil, luring intrepid collectors to woodlands in search of elusive but delectable wild mushrooms.

Skin cancer risks higher for soldiers serving abroad

Soldiers deployed to tropical and sunny climates are coming home with increased risk factors for a threat far from the battlefield: skin cancer.

Research offers new way to predict hurricane strength, destruction

A new study by Florida State University researchers demonstrates a different way of projecting a hurricane's strength and intensity that could give the public a better idea of a storm's potential for destruction.

Drug's effect on Alzheimer's may depend on severity of disease

A cancer drug that has shown promise against Alzheimer's disease in mice and has begun early clinical trials has yielded perplexing results in a novel mouse model of AD that mimics the genetics and pathology of the human disease more closely than any other animal model.

X-rays unlock a protein's SWEET side

Sugar is a vital source of energy for both plants and animals alike. Understanding just how sugar makes its way into the cell could lead to the design of better drugs for diabetes patients and an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables farmers are able to grow.

Collaboration drives achievement in protein structure research

When this week's print issue of the journal Science comes out, a collective cheer will go up from New Mexico, Montana and even the Netherlands, thanks to the type of collaborative effort that is more and more the norm in these connected times.

Judging a fish by its color: for female bluefin killifish, love is a yellow mate

There's an old adage that warns against passing judgment based on appearance, but female bluefin killifish, like many animal species, apparently don't share such human wisdom when choosing a mate.

The science behind swimming

At nearly 100 feet long and weighing as much as 170 tons, the blue whale is the largest creature on the planet, and by far the heaviest living thing ever seen on Earth. So there's no way it could have anything in common with the tiniest fish larvae, which measure millimeters in length and tip the scales at a fraction of a gram, right?

Decoding Virus-Host Interactions in the Oxygen-Starved Ocean

For multicellular life-plants and animals-to thrive in the oceans, there must be enough dissolved oxygen in the water. In certain coastal areas, extreme oxygen-starvation produces "dead zones" that decimate marine fisheries and destroy food web structure.

Researchers discover new producer of crucial vitamin

New research has determined that a single group of micro-organisms may be responsible for much of the world's vitamin B12 production in the oceans, with implications for the global carbon cycle and climate change.

Cancer-fighting cocktail demonstrates promising results as new treatment for advanced cervical cancer

Combining a standard chemotherapy drug with a second drug that stops cells from dividing improves both the survival and response rates for those with advanced cervical cancer, a new study by UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers finds.

Tigers, pandas and people a recipe for conservation insight

The first big revelation in conservation sciences was that studying the people on the scene as well as nature conservation was crucial. Now, as this science matures, researchers are showing that it's useful to compare apples and oranges.

EEG Study Findings Reveal How Fear is Processed in the Brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain.

Microbiome research shows each tree species has a unique bacterial identity

Each tree species has its own bacterial identity. That's the conclusion of University of Oregon researchers and colleagues from other institutions who studied the genetic fingerprints of bacteria on 57 species of trees growing on a Panamanian island.

Caregivers of family members newly diagnosed with mental illness at risk for anxiety

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Nursing, who studied the emotional distress of caring for a family member diagnosed with a mental illness, found anxiety is high for the primary caregiver at the initial diagnosis or early in the course of the illness and decreases over time.

This is your brain on snacks -- brain stimulation affects craving and consumption

Magnetic stimulation of a brain area involved in "executive function" affects cravings for and consumption of calorie-dense snack foods, reports a study in the September issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society.

Dental and nutrition experts call for radical rethink on free sugars intake

Sugars in the diet should make up no more than 3% of total energy intake to reduce the significant financial and social burdens of tooth decay, finds new research from UCL (University College London) and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Researchers debunk myth about Parkinson's disease

Using advanced computer models, neuroscience researchers at the University of Copenhagen have gained new knowledge about the complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease.

Genetics reveals patients susceptible to drug-induced pancreatitis

Doctors have discovered that patients with a particular genetic variation are four times more likely to develop pancreatitis if they are prescribed a widely used group of drugs.

Genetic Discovery Yields Prostate Cancer Test, Promise of Future Therapy

A genetic discovery out of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is leading to a highly accurate test for aggressive prostate cancer and identifies new avenues for treatment.

Scientists identify the master regulator of cells' heat shock response

Heat shock proteins protect the molecules in all human and animal cells with factors that regulate their production and work as thermostats.

Study Finds Drop in Death Rates from Strokes Over Last Two Decades

Despite the significant reduction in the overall incidence and death rates from strokes in the United States over the past twenty years, more attention needs to be paid to specific age groups, a recent study found.

Report urges individualized, cholesterol-targeted approach to heart disease and stroke

A recent guideline for using statins to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease has wavered too far from the simple cholesterol goals that have saved thousands of lives in the past decade, and doesn't adequately treat patients as individuals, experts said today in a national report.

Number-crunching could lead to unethical choices, says new study

Calculating the pros and cons of a potential decision is a way of decision-making. But repeated engagement with numbers-focused calculations, especially those involving money, can have unintended negative consequences, including social and moral transgressions, says new study co-authored by a professor at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.

'Squid skin' metamaterials project yields vivid color display

The quest to create artificial "squid skin" -- camouflaging metamaterials that can "see" colors and automatically blend into the background -- is one step closer to reality, thanks to a breakthrough color-display technology unveiled this week by Rice University's Laboratory for Nanophotonics (LANP).

'Femme fatale' emerald ash borer decoy lures and kills males

An international team of researchers has designed decoys that mimic female emerald ash borer beetles and successfully entice male emerald ash borers to land on them in an attempt to mate, only to be electrocuted and killed by high-voltage current.

MU Researcher Develops and Proves Effectiveness of New Drug for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

According to recent studies, approximately one out of every 40 individuals in the United States is a carrier of the gene responsible for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative disease that causes muscles to weaken over time.

Caving to cravings? Indulging in junk food linked to lapses in brain function

Overindulging in high-calorie snacks is partly caused by lapses in a very specific part of the brain, according to a new University of Waterloo study.

Long-Term Effects of Childhood Asthma Influenced by Socioeconomic Status

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 6 percent of children younger than five have been diagnosed with asthma, the fastest-growing and most common chronic illness affecting children in the United States.

Network measures predict neuropsychological outcome after brain injury

Cognitive neuroscience research has shown that certain brain regions are associated with specific cognitive abilities, such as language, naming, and decision-making.

Freshman girls know how to eat healthy but lack confidence in their ability to do it

Female college freshmen understand the benefits of eating healthy foods and know which foods they should include in their diets.

When casualties increased, war coverage became more negative

As the number of U.S. casualties rose in Afghanistan, reporters filed more stories about the conflict and those articles grew increasingly negative about both the war effort and the military, according to a Penn State researcher.

Researchers control surface tension to manipulate liquid metals

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a technique for controlling the surface tension of liquid metals by applying very low voltages, opening the door to a new generation of reconfigurable electronic circuits, antennas and other technologies.

'Small' transformation yields big changes

An inter­dis­ci­pli­nary team of researchers led by North­eastern Uni­ver­sity has devel­oped a novel method for con­trol­lably con­structing pre­cise inter-​​nanotube junc­tions and a variety of nanocarbon struc­tures in carbon nan­otube arrays.

Cells simply avoid chromosome confusion

Reproductive cell division has evolved a simple, mechanical solution to avoid chromosome sorting errors, researchers report in the Sept. 11 Science Express.

Scientists discover RNA modifications in some unexpected places

The so-called central dogma of molecular biology-that DNA makes RNA which makes protein-has long provided a simplified explanation for how genetic information is deciphered and translated in living organisms.

Unravelling cell division

At this very moment thousands of our body's cells are duplicating and dividing. This is the mechanism by which the body repairs damaged tissues and regenerates others like skin and hair.

Pitt chemical biologist finds new halogenation enzyme

Molecules containing carbon-halogen bonds are produced naturally across all kingdoms of life and constitute a large family of natural products with a broad range of biological activities.

A new therapeutic target may prevent blindness in premature babies at risk of retinopathy

According to a study conducted by pediatricians and researchers at Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center (Sainte-Justine) and Université de Montréal published online in the prestigious medical journal Nature Medicine on September 14, 2014, the activation of a receptor that migrates to the nucleus of nerve cells in the retina promotes the growth of blood vessels.

Mindfulness protects adults' health from the impacts of childhood adversity

Adults who were abused or neglected as children are known to have poorer health, but adults who tend to focus on, and accept their reactions to, the present moment-or are mindful-report having better health, regardless of their childhood adversity.

Delay in age of walking can herald muscular dystrophy in boys with cognitive delays

The timing of a toddler's first steps is an important developmental milestone, but a slight delay in walking is typically not a cause of concern by itself.

Study indicates hunting restrictions for tapirs may not be enough

A published study indicates that lowland tapir populations may continue to drop in French Guiana, despite recent restrictions on hunting.

Imaging identifies asymptomatic people at risk for stroke

Imaging can be a cost-effective way to identify people at risk for stroke who might benefit from aggressive intervention, according to a new modeling study published online in the journal Radiology.

Oregon researchers urge psychologists to see institutional betrayal

Clinical psychologists are being urged by two University of Oregon researchers to recognize the experiences of institutional betrayal so they can better treat their patients and respond in ways that help avoid or repair damaged trust when it occurs in their own institutions.

When Rulers Can't Understand the Ruled

Johns Hopkins University political scientists wanted to know if America's unelected officials have enough in common with the people they govern to understand them.

Study: Web-based training can reduce campus rape

Web-based training targeted at college-aged men is an effective tool for reducing the number of sexual assaults on U.S. campuses, according to a researcher in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University.

Sam Houston State study examines use of GIS in policing

Police agencies are using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for mapping crime, identifying crime "hot spots," assigning officers, and profiling offenders, but little research has been done about the effectiveness of the technology in curbing crime, according to a study at Sam Houston State University (SHSU).

Researchers develop improved means of detecting mismatched DNA

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified a highly sensitive means of analyzing very tiny amounts of DNA. The discovery, they say, could increase the ability of forensic scientists to match genetic material in some criminal investigations.

Study first to use brain scans to forecast early reading difficulties

UC San Francisco researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving clinicians a possible tool to spot children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties before they experience reading challenges.

Cost-share programs encourage most to mitigate wildfire danger

Most homeowners are willing to take part in cost-sharing that helps pay for wildfire risk mitigation on their properties, but some of those with the highest wildfire risk are the least likely to participate in those programs, according to a collaborative study by the University of Colorado Boulder and partnering institutions.

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