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Study estimates more than 100,000 cancer cases could stem from contaminants in tap water
A toxic cocktail of chemical pollutants in US drinking water could result in more than 100,000 cancer cases, according to a peer-reviewed study from Environmental Working Group -- the first study to conduct a cumulative assessment of cancer risks due to 22 carcinogenic contaminants found in drinking water nationwide.
For people with pre-existing liver disease, toxic algae may be more dangerous
Blooms of blue-green algae have flourished across much of the United States this year.
Did a common childhood illness take down the neanderthals?
A new study suggests that the extinction of Neanderthals may be tied to persistent, life-long ear infections due to the structure of their Eustachian tubes, which are similar to those of human infants.
Comparing major adverse cardiovascular events among patients with diabetes, reduced kidney function treated with metformin or sulfonylurea
This observational study compared major cardiovascular events (including hospitalization for heart attack, stroke, transient ischemic attack or cardiovascular death) among patients with diabetes and reduced kidney function treated with metformin or a sulfonylurea (a class of drugs to treat diabetes).
Artificial materials reconstruct the porpoise's echolocation
Here, a study proposed a physical directional emission model to bridge the gap between porpoises' biosonar and artificial metamaterial.
Lighting the path to renewable energy
Professor Mahesh Bandi of Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has co-developed a novel, standardized way of quantifying and comparing these variations in solar power.
Medications underused in treating opioid addiction, Mayo Clinic expert says
Though research shows that medication-assisted treatment can help people who are addicted to opioids, the three drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are underused, according to a review of current medical data on opioid addiction in the U.S.
Nano bulb lights novel path
Rice University engineers have created what may be viewed as the world's smallest incandescent lightbulbs, collections of near-nanoscale materials called 'selective thermal emitters' that absorb heat and emit light.
Earth Commission to identify risks, guardrails, targets for entire planet
A new Earth Commission, comprised of 19 of the world's foremost scientists, chaired by Johan Rockström, Joyeeta Gupta, and Dahe Qin, will define guardrails -- akin to >2C for climate -- for land, water, oceans and biodiversity leading to a coherent suite of practical, science-based targets.
Temple researchers identify new target regulating mitochondria during stress
Like an emergency response team that is called into action to save lives, stress response proteins in the heart are activated during a heart attack to help prevent cell death.
New research shows dapagliflozin used to treat diabetes can also
Dapagliflozin, a drug that is already used to successfully treat type 2 diabetes (T2D) and prevent development of heart failure, can also be used to treat pre-existing heart failure, even in patients without T2D.
New insight into the links between transport and land value
A new report reveals the relationships between transport and property value across the North of England.
New methodology for improving the quality of managerial accounting
It is known that the real sector of the economy is of paramount importance in the development of any region, in ensuring the growth of its inhabitants' welfare.
Circulating molecules in blood may be stepping stone for type 1 diabetes early prediction
Researchers from the Turku Bioscience Centre in Finland have found changes in molecules in the blood that might be new markers of type 1 diabetes.
Antibody 'road block' enables fine-tuning for cardiac recovery
A new study published by Vanderbilt mechanobiology researchers details a possible solution for fine-tuning inflammation and cellular activity in cardiac recovery -- thanks to an antibody initially developed for rheumatoid arthritis. 
Comparison of cardiovascular outcomes for medications to treat type 2 diabetes
This randomized clinical trial compared the outcomes of heart attack, stroke or death from cardiovascular causes among 6,000 patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with the glucose-lowering medications linagliptin or glimepiride.
DGIST achieves the highest efficiency of flexible CZTSSe thin-film solar cell
DGIST Division of Energy Technology achieves the highest photoelectric conversion efficiency in the world.
Food as medicine: UTHealth and partners fill prescriptions for food insecurity
The answer to food insecurity could be as simple as a prescription for healthy food from your health care provider and the means to obtain it, particularly in food deserts, said researchers led by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health.
Stem cells with 'dual identity' linked to loss of smell from sinus inflammation
In experiments with mice and human tissue samples, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that neuronal stem cells in the part of the nose responsible for the sense of smell transform themselves to perpetuate the long-term inflammation in chronic sinusitis.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...