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Genetic changes associated with physical activity reported
Machine learning used to improve understanding of sleep, physical (in)activity and their health consequences
Breast cancer screening: New emphasis on shared decision-making between women and their doctors
An updated guideline on screening for breast cancer emphasizes shared decision-making between women and their doctors, supporting women to make an informed decision based on personal preferences when the balance between benefits and harms is uncertain.
Increased cervical cancer risk in women with positive HPV, but no cellular abnormalities
Researchers have uncovered an increased risk of cervical cancer in women whose cervical cells test positive for certain high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types but do not show any signs of cellular abnormalities.
Using machine learning to design peptides
Northwestern, teaming up with Cornell University and the University of California, San Diego, developed a way of finding optimal peptide sequences: using a machine-learning algorithm as a collaborator.
NASA provides new look at Puerto Rico post-Hurricane Maria
Two new NASA research efforts delve into Hurricane Maria's far-reaching effects on the island's forests and on its residents' energy and electricity access.
Johns Hopkins team identifies promising diagnostic tool for Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have identified in live human brains new radioactive 'tracer' molecules that bind to and 'light up' tau tangles, a protein associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and other related dementias.
Activating parts of the brain could help alleviate opioid-related social isolation
One of the many painful and challenging aspects of the US opioid crisis is that people abusing opioids often isolate themselves from family and friends, making it difficult for loved ones to help people on a path towards recovery.
A minority of countries offer free early childhood education, UCLA researchers report
Few governments make pre-primary education available on a tuition-free basis for two or more years, according to a new study from UCLA's WORLD Policy Analysis Center (WORLD).
To ease out policy of population salt reduction to prevent cardiovascular disease is dangerous
The journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Disease (NMCD), has published an important and authoritative statement of the ESAN (European Salt Action Network).
First Nations children and youth experiencing more pain than non-First Nations children
First Nations children and youth are experiencing more pain than non-First Nations children, but do not access specialist or mental health services at the same rate as their non-First Nations peers, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Regular flu shots may save heart failure patients' lives
Compared with skipping a flu shot, getting a flu shot was associated with an 18 percent reduced risk of premature death among newly-diagnosed heart failure patients.
Ben-Gurion University researchers improve diabetes remission predictors in bariatric surgery
'We know weight-loss surgery has the potential to put diabetes in remission,' says Dr.
Successful bladder repair using silk fibroid scaffolds
A team of researchers developed a novel model of partial bladder outlet obstruction in female swine and used this model to show that even after inducing severe urinary outlet resistance and damage to the bladder, they could achieve significant improvements in bladder capacity through bladder reconstruction using acellular bi-layer silk fibroin grafts.
Plants as antifungal factories
Researchers from three research institutes in Spain have developed a biotechnological tool to produce, in a very efficient manner, antifungal proteins in the leaves of the plant Nicotiana benthamiana.
How glial cells develop in the brain from neural precursor cells
A Mainz-based research team studied how glial cells develop in the brain from neural precursor cells.
Why feeling empathy could lead former drug users to relapse
Empathy, the awareness of another's feelings and emotions, is a key feature in normal social interactions.
NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Owen's remnants reorganizing
The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Owen have been lingering in the Southern Pacific Ocean for days.
Small but versatile: Key players in the marine nitrogen cycle can utilize cyanate and urea
The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are amongst the most abundant marine microorganisms.
How catnip makes the chemical that causes cats to go crazy
Researchers at John Innes Centre have shed light on how catnip -- also known as catmint -- produces the chemical that sends cats into a state of wanton abandon.
Two compounds in coffee may team up to fight Parkinson's
Rutgers scientists have found a compound in coffee that may team up with caffeine to fight Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia -- two progressive and currently incurable diseases associated with brain degeneration.
Topological matters: Toward a new kind of transistor
An experiment has demonstrated, for the first time, electronic switching in an exotic, ultrathin material that can carry a charge with nearly zero loss at room temperature.
A glimmer of hope for the world's coral reefs
The future of the world's coral reefs is uncertain, as the impact of global heating continues to escalate.
Fewer than half of the countries provide tuition-free pre-primary education
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and UCLA Fielding School of Public Health's WORLD Policy Analysis Center have found that 45 percent of countries, with only 15 percent of low-income countries, provide tuition-free pre-primary education.
Most people overestimate total number of US gun owners
Most people vastly overestimate the population of gun owners in the United States, and it potentially influences how groups approach gun policies, according to a study by two University of Kansas political scientists.
Memory tests predict brain atrophy and Alzheimer's disease
Use of two episodic memory tests help in predicting brain atrophy and Alzheimer's disease, as indicated by a study carried out at the University of Helsinki and the University of California.
Hair colour gene study sheds new light on roots of redheads' locks
Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have discovered eight additional genes linked to red hair, helping to solve a mystery of how redheads inherit their flaming locks.
Researchers create tiny droplets of early universe matter
Researchers have created tiny droplets of the ultra-hot matter that once filled the early universe, forming three distinct shapes and sizes: circles, ellipses and triangles.
How does cancer spread?
How does cancer spread? While studying human brain tumour cells, a team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) found some answers to this crucial, yet so far unanswered question.
Cancer cells distinguished by artificial intelligence-based system
A research team at Osaka University created a system that uses a convolutional neural network to learn the features distinguishing different cancer cells, based on images from a phase-contrast microscope.
Big datasets pinpoint new regions to explore the genome for disease
Researchers develop a model that explores more than 100,000 healthy humans to identify regions of our genes that are intolerant to change.
Ezogabine treatment shown to reduce motor neuron excitability in ALS patients
Brian Wainger, MD, PhD, of the Healey Center for ALS at Massachusetts General Hospital presented initial, top-level results of a recently completed phase 2 clinical trial of ezogabine at the Motor Neurone Disease Association annual meeting.
Siblings of children with autism or ADHD are at elevated risk for both disorders
Later-born siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at elevated risk for both disorders, a new study led by Meghan Miller, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and at the UC Davis MIND Institute, has concluded.
Addressing sleep disorders after traumatic brain injury
Amsterdam, NL, December 10, 2018 - Disorders of sleep are some of the most common problems experienced by patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Breast cancer recruits bone marrow cells to increase cancer cell proliferation
Tel Aviv University researchers have discovered that breast cancer tumors boost their growth by recruiting stromal cells that originate in bone marrow.
Buridan's donkey: Neuroscience resolves medieveal decision-making conundrum
The brain updates its preferences in real-time in order to choose between two equally attractive options, reveals a human neuroimaging and eye-tracking study published in JNeurosci.
Electronic evidence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in an iron-based superconductor
Recently, a research team led by Prof. Xingjiang Zhou from Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has conducted high-resolution laser-based ARPES experiments on the superconducting gap and electronic structure in the optimally-doped (Ba0.6K0.4)Fe2As2 superconductor.
Media Advisory: Young age associated with worse prognosis in specific breast cancer subtype
Researchers at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center are rapidly advancing the understanding of biological factors, including hormones, as predictors of longer disease-free survival for certain subtypes of breast cancer.
Females prefer city frogs' tunes
Urban sophistication has real sex appeal -- at least if you're a Central American amphibian.
Frog sex in the city
How do animals adapt to urban environments? In the case of the Tungara frog, city males put on a more elaborate mating display than males in forested areas.
UNH researchers find unexpected impact of hurricanes on Puerto Rico's watershed
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found unprecedentedly high levels of nitrate, an essential plant nutrient, in streams and watersheds of Puerto Rico for a year after two consecutive major hurricanes in 2017.
The fauna in the Antarctica is threatened by pathogens humans spread in polar latitudes
The fauna in the Antarctica could be in danger due the pathogens humans spread in places and research stations in the southern ocean, according to a study led by the experts Jacob González-Solís, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona, and Marta Cerdà-Cuéllas, from the Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology (IRTA-CReSA).
Small but versatile
The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are amongst the most abundant marine microorganisms.
Millions of low-risk people with diabetes may be testing their blood sugar too often
For people with Type 2 diabetes, testing blood sugar levels becomes part of everyday life.
Treatment of hypertension induced albuminuria
Patients with albuminuria will usually need more than one drug to achieve blood pressure control, particularly if the aim is also to reduce albuminuria.
Topological material switched off and on for the first time
Australian study just out in Nature represents a significant advance in topological transistors and beyond-CMOS electronics.
Nanoglue can make composites several times tougher during dynamic loading
Materials scientists at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have found that oscillating loads at certain frequencies can lead to several-fold increases in the strength of composites with an interface that is modified by a molecular layer of 'nanoglue.'
Researchers develop personalized medicine tool for inherited colorectal cancer syndrome
An international team of researchers led by Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) has developed, calibrated, and validated a novel tool for identifying the genetic changes in Lynch syndrome genes that are likely to be responsible for causing symptoms of the disease.
Compelling evidence for small drops of perfect fluid
Nuclear physicists analyzing data from the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have published additional evidence that collisions of miniscule projectiles with gold nuclei create tiny specks of the perfect fluid that filled the early universe.
Sprayable gel could help the body fight off cancer after surgery
A UCLA-led research team has developed a spray gel embedded with immune-boosting drugs that could help lower the risk of cancer recurrence after surgery.
Genetic study of epilepsy points to potential new therapies
The largest study of its kind, led by international researchers including scientists at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland), has discovered 11 new genes associated with epilepsy.
NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a method for evaluating and selecting optimal antenna designs for future fifth-generation (5G) cellphones, other wireless devices and base stations.
Strep bacteria compete for 'ownership' of human tissue
A new study shows how whatever strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae establishes itself first in a mammal's tissues is more likely to thrive than Strep 'latecomers.'
Penn team uses gene editing to personalize clinical care for family with cardiomyopathy
More and more, through sequencing done for medical reasons or done by direct-to-consumer companies, people learn they have variants of disease genes with uncertain significance to their health.
SwRI solar activity research provides insight into sun's past, future
A team led by Southwest Research Institute has developed a new technique for looking at historic solar data to distinguish trustworthy observations from those that should be used with care.
Study examines risk of stroke by sex among black and white women, men
This study examined the risk of stroke by sex among more than 25,000 black and white women and men.
Inequality in homicide rates in Chicago neighborhoods increased over 20-year period
While nearly all neighborhoods in Chicago benefited from reductions in homicide, relative inequality in crime between the city's safest and most dangerous neighborhoods actually increased by 10 percent over recent years, according to a new Northwestern University study.
Syracuse physicist creates tiny sensors to assist in cancer detection
A Syracuse University physicist hopes to improve cancer detection with a new and novel class of nanomaterials.
Some brain tumors may respond to immunotherapy, new study suggests
A new study suggests that a slow-growing brain tumor arising in patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) may be vulnerable to immunotherapy, which gives the immune system a boost in fighting cancer.
Proteins for making tough rubber
Inspired by nature, Chinese scientists have produced a synthetic analogue to vulcanized natural rubber.
Providers show interest in prescribing therapeutic cannabinoids
A team from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found many dermatologists are interested in learning more about and recommending therapeutic cannabinoids to their patients.
Houses in hurricane strike zones are built back bigger
A study of hurricane-hit areas of the United States has revealed a trend of larger homes being built to replace smaller ones in the years following a storm.
'Doc, sometimes I'm in pain!': How do patients want to discuss symptoms with clinicians?
A new Regenstrief Institute study has found that patients want to tell their doctors about their symptoms and would be willing to do so via a formal reporting system, but patients are reluctant to report symptoms if they perceive busy clinicians will not use that information to improve care.
Interplay between MicroRNAs and targeted genes in cellular homeostasis of adult zebrafish
The objective of study was to understand the damages induced by toxins in the liver and the intestine as well as the interplay between the miRNome and transcriptome baseline characterization in these tissues in healthy animals under cellular homeostasis.
Statins have low risk of side effects
Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs are associated with a low risk of side effects.
Estimates of ASD, ADHD risk in siblings born after older children with those disorders
Siblings born in a family after other children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were more likely to be diagnosed with the same disorder or the other disorder.
Editing consciousness: How bereaved people control their thoughts without knowing it
A new study from Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Irving Medical Center shows that avoidant grievers unconsciously monitor and block the contents of their mind-wandering, a discovery that could lead to more effective psychiatric treatment for bereaved people.
Increasing seal population will not harm largest fish stocks in the Baltic
Seals feeding on fish does not decrease fish stocks of Baltic cod, herring and sprat the most -- climate change, nutrient load and fisheries do, shows a new study from Stockholm University.
When scientists push people to their tipping point
You probably overestimate just how far someone can push you before you reach your tipping point, new research suggests.
Predicting leaky heart valves with 3D printing
Researchers at the Wyss Institute have created a novel 3D printing workflow that allows cardiologists to evaluate how different valve sizes will interact with each patient's unique anatomy, before the medical procedure is actually performed.
Invasive species and habitat loss our biggest biodiversity threats
Invasive species and habitat loss are the biggest threats to Australian biodiversity, according to new research by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub in partnership with The University of Queensland.
Scientists discover how birds and dinosaurs evolved to dazzle with colourful displays
Iridescence is responsible for some of the most striking visual displays in the animal kingdom.
Study: Early career choices appear to influence personality
In the state of Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany, 16-year-old students in middle-track schools decide whether to stay in school to pursue an academic career or enroll in a vocational training program.
Ozone depletion increases Antarctic snowfall, partially mitigates ice sheet loss
Ozone layer depletion has increased snowfall over Antarctica in recent decades, partially mitigating the ongoing loss of the continent's ice sheet mass, new University of Colorado Boulder research finds.
Scientists brew lava and blow it up to better understand volcanoes
What happens when lava and water meet? Explosive experiments with manmade lava are helping to answer this important question.
Novel laser technology for microchip-size chemical sensors
At TU Wien (Vienna), a special laser system has been developed, using two slightly different fequency combs.
Dopamine's yin-yang personality: It's an upper and a downer
Dopamine has a reputation as the key player in the brain's reward circuits, making us seek out pleasurable experiences, but growing evidence points to a multipronged role for the neurotransmitter.
Life in Deep Earth totals 15 to 23 billion tons of carbon -- hundreds of times more than humans
Barely living 'zombie' bacteria and other forms of life constitute an immense amount of carbon deep within Earth's subsurface -- 245 to 385 times greater than the carbon mass of all humans on the surface, according to Deep Carbon Observatory scientists nearing the end of a 10-year international collaboration to reveal Earth's innermost secrets.
New insights into childhood cancer
Peripheral nervous system tumors, known as neuroblastoma, are one of the most common types of childhood tumors.
Obesity, risk of cognitive dysfunction? Consider high-intensity interval exercise
Researchers have discovered what might be an effective strategy to prevent and combat cognitive dysfunction in obese individuals.
SwRI-led team finds evidence for carbon-rich surface on Ceres
A team led by Southwest Research Institute has concluded that the surface of dwarf planet Ceres is rich in organic matter.
Underground life has a carbon mass hundreds of times larger than humans'
Microorganisms living underneath the surface of the earth have a total carbon mass of 15 to 23 billion tons, hundreds of times more than that of humans, according to findings announced by the Deep Carbon Observatory and coauthored by UT Professor of Microbiology Karen Lloyd.
Smelling the forest not the trees: Why animals are better at sniffing complex smells
Animals are much better at smelling a complex 'soup' of odorants rather than a single pure ingredient, a new study by the University of Sussex has revealed.
Researchers image atomic structure of important immune regulator
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital provides a biophysical and structural assessment of a critical immune regulating protein called human T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain containing protein-3 (hTIM-3).
Researchers pioneer use of new method to treat life-threatening heart arrhythmias in dogs
Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers have developed a new treatment for dogs with a rare, but life-threatening, arrhythmia caused by atrioventricular accessory pathways (APs).
Your brain on imagination: It's a lot like reality, study shows
New brain imaging research shows that imagining a threat lights up similar regions as experiencing it does.
MD Anderson study shows key enzyme linked to therapy resistance in deadly lung cancer
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a link between an enzyme tied to cancer formation and therapy resistance in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Study points to optimal blood pressure treatment for stroke patients
Aggressive treatment of hypertension in stroke patients could do more harm than good in the long term, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Georgia.
Study identifies a key cellular mechanism that triggers pneumonia in humans
Researchers have demonstrated that influenza virus impairs the immune response to pneumococcus, especially monocyte activity.
Coping skills program for disaster survivors tested with children living in chronic poverty
An emotional coping skills program developed for natural disaster survivors appears to help young children deal with the traumatic experiences associated with living in chronic poverty, a new study found.

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Circular
We're told if the economy is growing, and if we keep producing, that's a good thing. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers explore circular systems that regenerate and re-use what we already have. Guests include economist Kate Raworth, environmental activist Tristram Stuart, landscape architect Kate Orff, entrepreneur David Katz, and graphic designer Jessi Arrington.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#503 Postpartum Blues (Rebroadcast)
When a woman gives birth, it seems like everyone wants to know how the baby is doing. What does it weigh? Is it breathing right? Did it cry? But it turns out that, in the United States, we're not doing to great at asking how the mom, who just pushed something the size of a pot roast out of something the size of a Cheerio, is doing. This week we talk to anthropologist Kate Clancy about her postpartum experience and how it is becoming distressingly common, and we speak with Julie Wiebe about prolapse, what it is and how it's...