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The integrated catalysts can simplify pharmaceutical manufacturing
Prof. In Su Lee and his research team from POSTECH developed catalytic platforms based on metal organic frameworks.
Guidelines for thyroid surgery published in Annals of Surgery
The first set of comprehensive, evidence-based clinical guidelines for surgical treatment of thyroid disease -- developed by an expert panel assembled by the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES) -- was published today by Annals of Surgery.
Osteosarcoma profiling reveals why immunotherapy remains ineffective
Comprehensive profiling of tumor samples taken from patients with osteosarcoma shows that multiple factors contribute to the traditionally poor responses observed from treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
The strategy of cells to deal with the accumulation of misfolded proteins is identified
In the paper, published in the journal Cell Reports, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe yeast model has been used to investigate the protein quality control process.

ER patients may care less about a doctor's race and gender than previously thought
When a patient goes to an ER today, they have a higher chance than before of seeing a doctor who's a woman or a person of color.
Why do whales migrate? They return to the tropics to shed their skin, scientists say
Whales undertake some of the longest migrations on earth, often swimming many thousands of miles, over many months, to breed in the tropics.
A little good is good enough -- excuses and 'indulgence effects' in consumption
Ecofriendly materials, produced under good work conditions -- convincing arguments for most of us.
How decline in memory, gait speed are associated with dementia risk
The risk of dementia in adults 60 and older who experience declines in both memory and gait speed was compared with adults who experience no decline or decline in either memory or gait speed only in this observational meta-analysis that included six studies with about 8,700 participants from the US and Europe.
Antidepressant harms baby neurons in lab-grown 'mini-brains'
Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have demonstrated the use of stem-cell-derived 'mini-brains' to detect harmful side effects of a common drug on the developing brain.
Hormone adjustment may lead to new ways to prevent and treat lung damage in premature infants
Prematurely born babies often need oxygen therapy to prevent brain damage or death.

Global database for Karst spring discharges
For the first time researchers present comprehensive records that facilitate sustainable water management.
Deciphering the mechanism that determines organ size and shape
The study, published in the journal Developmental Cell and performed in Drosophila, unravels how developmental genes regulate organ size and proportions.
Social accounting, a different perspective when analysing public spending efficiency
A UPV/EHU's research group has shown that it is possible to express in terms of money the social value generated by a hospital.
The practice of meditation leaves marks in the brain
The study conducted at IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca shows that the practice of Transcendental Meditation has positive effects on psychological well-being and that these effects are correlated with measurable changes in the brain.
How earthquakes deform gravity
Researchers at the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ in Potsdam have developed an algorithm that for the first time can describe a gravitational signal caused by earthquakes with high accuracy.
Shaping the rings of molecules
Canadian chemists discover a natural process to control the shape of 'macrocycles,' molecules of large rings of atoms, for use in pharmaceuticals and electronics.

Study finds certain genetic test not useful in predicting heart disease risk
A Polygenic Risk Score -- a genetic assessment that doctors have hoped could predict coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients -- has been found not to be a useful predictive biomarker for disease risk, according to a Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
Major discovery in the genetics of Down syndrome
New research highlights the RCAN1 gene's effect on memory and learning.
Drug cocktail holds promise for spinal injuries
Scientists have discovered a combination of two commonly available drugs that could help the body heal spinal fractures.
Despite burdens most pediatricians very supportive of national vaccination program
Despite bureaucratic hurdles, the vast majority of pediatricians want to keep participating in a national program that provides vaccinations at no cost to children who are on Medicaid, uninsured, or who are American Indian/Alaska Native, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
New probe developed to detect a common target of anti-inflammatory drugs
Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology have recently developed a new probe to detect the activity of Cyclooxygenase-2, an enzyme that plays a major role in driving the progression of cancer.
Study examines why colon cancer is more deadly in pediatric and young adult patients
Colon cancer is more likely to be lethal in children and young adults than middle-aged adults.
Frozen bird turns out to be 46,000-year-old horned lark
Scientists have recovered DNA from a well-preserved horned lark found in Siberian permafrost.

Mental health challenges four times higher in young mothers
The study, recently published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, says identifying and treating mental health issues in young mothers is especially important as their health also affects the wellbeing of their children.
Ethnobotanical medicine is effective against the bacterium causing Lyme disease
A preclinical in vitro study shows that selected plant-based herbal medicines, especially Ghanaian quinine and Japanese knotweed, work better than antibiotics against the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.
A better diagnosis of rare diabetes to adapt treatment
Monogenic diabetes affects 1% to 4% of all cases of diabetes.
KIST researchers develop high-capacity EV battery materials that double driving range
Dr. Hun-Gi Jung and his research team at the Center for Energy Storage Research of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology have announced the development of silicon anode materials that can increase battery capacity four-fold in comparison to graphite anode materials and enable rapid charging to more than 80% capacity in only five minutes.
Scientists crack the mystery of liquid light interactions in organic materials, laying the ground
A team of scientists from the Hybrid Photonics Laboratory at the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) and the University of Sheffield (UK) made a breakthrough in understanding nonlinear physics of the strong interaction of organic molecules with light.
A plan to save Earth's oceans
At least 26 per cent of our oceans need urgent conservation attention to preserve Earth's marine biodiversity, a University of Queensland-led international study has found.
NUI Galway highlights reproductive flexibility in hydractinia, a Galway bay jellyfish
A new study, led by Dr Tim DuBuc and Professor Uri Frank from the Centre for Chromosome Biology at NUI Galway, has found that Hydractinia, a North Atlantic jellyfish that also lives in Galway Bay, reproduces in a similar way to humans but does so far more flexibly.
Alcohol-induced deaths in US
National vital statistics data from 2000 to 2016 were used to examine how rates of alcohol-induced deaths (defined as those deaths due to alcohol consumption that could be avoided if alcohol weren't involved) have changed in the US and to compare the results by demographic groups including sex, race/ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status and geographic location.

Antibiotics in animals: More research urgently needed
Resistance to antibiotics has been declared a global health emergency -- and it's not just humans who are impacted by this public health crisis.
NASA measures rainfall rates in two American Samoa Tropical Cyclones
There are two tropical cyclones affecting American Samoa in the South Pacific Ocean on Feb.
Essential oil components can be tested as drug candidates
A research team at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology and the KU Leuven Department of Biology showed that, contrary to generally held belief, most components of essential oils could meet the criteria set for drug candidates.
Cross-talk between enzymes that read and correct recipes in the cookbook of life
Even the best chef can make mistakes - even when using the recipes (genes) from the 'cookbook of life' -- DNA.
Intervention is essential for reducing loneliness and social isolation in ASD
Researchers evaluated the efficacy of the Preschool Peer Social Intervention in facilitating peer engagement among preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), with a primary goal of increasing their social engagement during mixed interactions with their peers with ASD and peers with typical development.
TMI: More information doesn't necessarily help people make better decisions
New research from Stevens Institute of Technology suggests that too much knowledge can lead people to make worse decisions, pointing to a critical gap in our understanding of how new information interacts with prior knowledge and beliefs.
Greener spring, warmer air
Advanced leaf-out enhances annual surface warming in the Northern Hemisphere
Traditional biomass stoves shown to cause lung inflammation
Traditional stoves that burn biomass materials and are not properly ventilated, which are widely used in developing nations where cooking is done indoors, have been shown to significantly increase indoor levels of harmful PM2.5 (miniscule atmospheric particulates) and carbon monoxide (CO) and to stimulate biological processes that cause lung inflammation and may lead to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
NASA sees tropical cyclone 18p form near American Samoa
The low-pressure area that has been lingering west-northwest of American Samoa for several days has organized into a tropical depression.
Social isolation during adolescence drives long-term disruptions in social behavior
Mount Sinai Researchers find social isolation during key developmental windows drives long term changes to activity patterns of neurons involved in initiating social approach in an animal model.
Bariatric surgery effective against early-onset obesity too
Surgical treatment of obesity is as effective for individuals who developed the disorder early, by the age of 20, as for those who have developed obesity later in life, a study from the University of Gothenburg shows.
New torula yeast product as digestible as fish meal in weanling pig diets
Starting weanling pigs off with the right diet can make all the difference for the health and productivity of the animal.
University of Minnesota researchers discover Mediterranean diet ingredient may extend life
Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School discover a potential new way in which diet influences aging-related diseases.

Top Science Podcasts

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Now Playing: Science for the People

#551 Translating Science, Part 2
This week on Science for the People, we're discussing how Siksika become one of the official translation languages for press releases from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). The area of the world that is now known as Canada has an abundance of distinct languages; according to the 2016 Census, over 70 are still spoken. But the British government, and then the Canadian government, spent generations trying to prevent children from learning these languages. One of the languages spoken in the prairies is Siksika, also called Blackfoot (the English translation). Host Marion Kilgour speaks to Sharon Yellowfly and Corey Gray...
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Other Latif: Episode 3
The Other Latif Radiolab's Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda's top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser's lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab's Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn't do. Along the way, Radiolab's Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.   Episode 3: Sudan Latif turns his focus to Sudan, where his namesake spent time working on a sunflower farm. A sunflower farm owned... by Osama bin Laden. Latif scrutinizes the evidence to try to discover whether - as Abdul Latif's lawyer insists - it was just an innocent clerical job, or whether - as the government alleges - it was what turned him into an extremist fighter.  This episode was produced by Suzie Lechtenberg, Sarah Qari, and Latif Nasser.  With help from Niza Nondo and Maaki Monem. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Alex Overington, Jeremy Bloom, and Amino Belyamani.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.