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Today's Science News and Current Events


Exposure to larger air particles linked to increased risk of asthma in children
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter -- a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber -- are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children.
Stroke patients receive clot-busting medication more than twice as fast as national rates
Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Northern California are delivering clot-busting medication to new stroke patients more than twice as fast as the national average.
Real-time observation of collective quantum modes
When symmetries in quantum systems are spontaneously broken, the collective excitation modes change in characteristic ways.
Scientists win a gold metal for liquid behavior
Researchers at University of Tokyo's Institute of Industrial Science report the first direct observation of atoms moving in liquid by collaborating with National Institute of Materials Science.
BIDMC researchers use artificial intelligence to identify bacteria quickly and accurately
Microscopes enhanced with artificial intelligence (AI) could help clinical microbiologists diagnose potentially deadly blood infections and improve patients' odds of survival, according to microbiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC).
Higher blood sugar in early pregnancy raises baby's heart-defect risk
Higher blood sugar early in pregnancy raises the baby's risk of a congenital heart defect, even among mothers who do not have diabetes, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Nanodiscs catch misfolding proteins red-handed
When proteins misfold, accumulate and clump around insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, they kill cells.
Our memory shifts into high gear when we think about raising our children, new study shows
Human memory has evolved so people better recall events encountered while they are thinking about raising their offspring, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
3-D nanoscale imaging made possible
In a research article '3D Nano-scale Imaging by Plasmonic Brownian Microscopy' published today in Nanophotonics, the team around Prof.
How much can late Permian ecosystems tell us about modern Earth? A lot.
New paleontological research shows that during the late Permian, the equator was dry and desert-like, yet surprisingly a hotspot for biodiversity.
Genetic instructions from mom set the pattern for embryonic development
A new study indicates an essential role for a maternally inherited gene in embryonic development.
Superradiance of an ensemble of nuclei excited by a free electron laser
A collaboration of scientists has succeeded in verifying a basic prediction of the quantum-mechanical behavior of resonant systems.
Columbia engineers develop floating solar fuels rig for seawater electrolysis
Chemical engineering professor Daniel Esposito has developed a novel photovoltaic-powered electrolysis device that can operate as a stand-alone platform that floats on open water.
Coarse particulate matter may increase asthma risk
Children exposed to coarse particulate matter may be more likely to develop asthma and to be treated in an ER or be hospitalized for the condition, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Stuttering: Stop signals in the brain prevent fluent speech
A hyperactive network inhibits the flow of speech.
Error-free into the quantum computer age
A study led by physicists at Swansea University in Wales, carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers.
Unusual thermal convection in a well-mixed fluid: Can a syrup separate when mixed?
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University, have recently discovered unusual thermal convection in a uniform mixture of high and low viscosity liquids.
Indonesian island found to be unusually rich in cave paintings
A tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, has been found to be unusually rich in ancient cave paintings following a study by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU).
Russian scientists developed a new technology of energy generation from bituminous coal
A team from Ural Federal University (UrFU) developed a new efficient technology of electrical power generation from bituminous coal.
Scientists Describe the Structure of a Prospective Luminesce Substance
A physicist from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and Kirensky Institute of Physics Federal Research Center KSC SB RAS (IF) described the structure and properties of a new substance obtained by his Chinese colleagues.
How much soil goes down the drain -- New data on soil lost due to water
According to a new study, almost 36 billion tons of soil is lost every year due to water, and deforestation and other changes in land use make the problem worse.
KAIST team develops technology to find optimum drug target for cancer
A KAIST research team led by Professor Kwang-Hyun Cho of the Department of Bio and Brain Engineering developed technology to find the optimum drug target according to the type of cancer cell.
Genetic study uncovers fungal sex secrets, which shed light on candidiasis
A new genetic analysis of fungal yeast infections (candidiasis) from around the world has revealed surprising secrets about how these microbes reproduce and cause disease, according to a new study published in Current Biology from researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, Spain.
Many women report not feeling completely informed about breast cancer treatment options
Results from two separate studies in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons showed a decision aid tool may help mitigate the sense of urgency patients feel about making treatment decisions.
Complete design of a silicon quantum computer chip unveiled
Research teams all over the world are exploring different ways to design a working computing chip that can integrate quantum interactions.
New chronic kidney disease audit published
Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships, Clinical Commissioning Groups and primary care practices must all work together to improve outcomes for patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), according to the national Chronic Kidney Disease Audit published today.
More electronic materials opened up with new metal-organic framework
More materials for electronic applications could be identified, thanks to the discovery of a new metal-organic framework (MOF) that displays electrical semiconduction with a record high photoresponsivity, by a global research collaboration involving the University of Warwick.
Erectile dysfunction is red flag for silent early cardiovascular disease
Despite decades long prevention and treatment efforts, cardiovascular (CV) disease continues to be the leading cause of death worldwide.
Study prompts new ideas on cancers' origins
Cancer therapies often target cells that grow and divide rapidly, such as stem cells, but in studying how stomach cancers occur, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Dementia with Lewy bodies: Unique genetic profile identified
Dementia with Lewy bodies has a unique genetic profile, distinct from those of Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease, according to the first large-scale genetic study of this common type of dementia.
Distinct human mutations can alter the effect of medicine
About one third of all medicine binds to the same type of receptor in the human body.
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kai-Tak moving over the Philippines
NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of Tropical Storm Kai-Tak that revealed the western side of storm had moved into the southern and central Philippines.
A shoe-box-sized chemical detector
A chemical sensor prototype developed at the University of Michigan will be able to detect 'single-fingerprint quantities' of substances from a distance of more than 100 feet away, and its developers are working to shrink it to the size of a shoebox.
Vitamin deficiency in later life
One in two persons aged 65 and above has suboptimal levels of vitamin D in the blood.
The hazards of antibiotic resistances remain high
According to a survey among researchers, it is difficult to quantify the true extent of the hazards of antibiotic resistances to humankind.
Record high photoconductivity for new metal-organic framework material
An international team of scientists, from the University of Surrey, University of São Paulo (Brazil), the University of Warwick and the University of Grenoble-Alpes (France), has created a new metal-organic framework (MOF) that has shown record-high photo-conductivity levels for a material of its type.
Heavy-petroleum fuels raising vanadium emissions
Human emissions of the potentially harmful trace metal vanadium into Earth's atmosphere have spiked sharply since the start of the 21st century due in large part to industry's growing use of heavy oils, tar sands, bitumen and petroleum coke for energy, a new Duke study finds.
Scientific achievements during the operation of Lomonosov satellite
The Lomonosov Project is a large-scale scientific and educational space project of Lomonosov Moscow State University aimed at studying space phenomena.
New technique could make captured carbon more valuable
Carbon capture could help coal plants reduce emissions if economic challenges can be overcome.
A new theory to describe widely used material
LiU researcher Klas Tybrandt has put forward a theoretical model that explains the coupling between ions and electrons in the widely used conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS.
After searching 12 years for bipolar disorder's cause, U-M team concludes it has many
Nearly 6 million Americans have bipolar disorder, and most have probably wondered why.
Screening could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happen
Screening for osteoporosis could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happen.
Arctic sea ice affects and is affected by mid-latitude weather
New work by Dr Michael Kelleher and Prof James Screen from the University of Exeter find evidence that sea ice change is both a driver of and a response to atmospheric variability.
Nanoparticles as a solution against antibiotic resistance?
Scientists of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany succeeded in developing an efficient method to treat mucoviscidosis.
Amber-tinted glasses may provide relief for insomnia
Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center tested a method to reduce the adverse effects of evening ambient light exposure, while still allowing use of blue light-emitting devices.
What does hair loss have to teach us about cancer metastasis?
Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have identified a signaling pathway regulating cell migration and metastasis.
Extending food safety training to other countries could save live
Food safety practices that Americans take for granted -- washing hands with soap, refrigeration, and not cutting raw meat and vegetables on the same surface without disinfection -- are not widely practiced in other places around the world, and researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences want to change that.
Research points to second chance for rejected antibiotic candidate
An antibiotic candidate compound shelved in the 1970s in favour of more worthwhile drugs could be worth a second look, new research has found.
Complex, old-growth forests may protect some bird species in a warming climate
Old forests that contain large trees and a diversity of tree sizes and species may offer refuge to some types of birds facing threats in a warming climate, scientists have found.
Health and spirituality values influence attendance for pelvic-floor dysfunction treatment
New research from psychologists and health professionals in Swansea has found that the types of life values that patients hold affect their attendance at medical treatment for pelvic-floor dysfunction, a condition affecting over 25 percent of all women in the UK.
Single-photon detector can count to 4
Engineers have shown that a widely used method of detecting single photons can also count the presence of at least four photons at a time.
UTA discovery could reduce cost, energy for high-speed Internet connections
UTA and University of Vermont researchers developed an optical medium in which multiple beams of light can autocorrect their properties without affecting other beams.
Quantum memory with record-breaking capacity based on laser-cooled atoms
The emerging domain of parallelized quantum information processing opens up new possibilities for precise measurements, communication and imaging.

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