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Machine learning homes in on catalyst interactions to accelerate materials development
A machine learning technique rapidly rediscovered rules governing catalysts that took humans years of difficult calculations to reveal--and even explained a deviation.
Why do structural differences in α-synuclein aggregates cause different pathologies?
Abnormal α-synuclein aggregation has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases and is known to spread in a prion-like manner.
High-fibre diet, low level inflammation: sidestepping the effects of radiation
Loved or hated, the humble oat could be the new superfood for cancer patients as international research shows a diet rich in fibre could significantly reduce radiation-induced gut inflammation.
New woodlands can help reduce flooding risk within 15 years
New research by the University of Plymouth suggests the planting of more trees could have a significant and positive effect in preventing flash flooding.

Senescent cells may be good when it comes to a bad injury
It's called senescence, when stressed cells can no longer divide to make new cells, and it's considered a factor in aging and in some diseases.
210 scientists highlight state of plants and fungi in Plants, People, Planet special issue
The Special Issue, 'Protecting and sustainably using the world's plants and fungi', brings together the research - from 210 scientists across 42 countries - behind the 2020 State of the World's Plants and Fungi report, also released today by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
Scientists studied nanoparticles embedded in silver-ion-exchanged glasses
Researchers have registered the formation of silver nanoparticles in an ion-exchanged glass as a result of infrared laser irradiation.
Pioneering dual surgery a safe option for patients with polycystic kidney disease
Patients with large polycystic kidneys in need of a kidney transplant can have their diseased kidneys safely removed laparoscopically at the same time as their transplant surgery.
Girls benefit from doing sports
Extracurricular sport in middle childhood diminishes subsequent ADHD symptoms in girls, but not in boys, a new study suggests.
Conversation quickly spreads droplets inside buildings
With implications for the transmission of diseases like COVID-19, researchers have found that ordinary conversation creates a conical 'jet-like' airflow that quickly carries a spray of tiny droplets from a speaker's mouth across meters of an interior space.

Coming soon to a circuit near you
We know that DNA molecules express heredity through genetic information.
Second alignment plane of solar system discovered
A study of comet motions indicates that the Solar System has a second alignment plane.
Study highlights lack of evidence for plasticity-led evolution in lizards
Scientists have challenged a popular theory behind the evolution of similar traits in island lizards, in a study published recently in eLife.
OU-led study aims to use microbial information to inform global climate change models
A study led by researchers from the OU Institute of Environmental Genomics tackles a problem that has challenged scientists for more than a decade.
Geoscience: Cosmic diamonds formed during gigantic planetary collisions
Geoscientists from Goethe University have found the largest extraterrestrial diamonds ever discovered - a few tenths of a millimetre in size nevertheless - inside meteorites.
20-year research breakthrough offers new hope for breast cancer patients
A new treatment for breast cancer patients with hormone receptor (HR+) early stage disease who are at a high risk of recurrence has been shown to reduce the risk by 25%, according to a study led by The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust.

App analyzes coronavirus genome on a smartphone
A team led by Garvan's Dr Ira Deveson developed the app 'Genopo' that can analyse the coronavirus genome on a portable Android device.
Study reveals dietary fructose heightens inflammatory bowel disease
Diet remains an important part of disease prevention and management, and a new study suggests that consumption of fructose may worsen intestinal inflammation common to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).
Planet collision simulations give clues to atmospheric loss from Moon's origin
Earth could have lost anywhere between ten and 60 per cent of its atmosphere in the collision that is thought to have formed the Moon.
Diabetes drug boosts survival in patients with type 2 diabetes and COVID-19 pneumonia
Sitagliptin, a drug to lower blood sugar in type 2 diabetes, also improves survival in diabetic patients hospitalized with COVID-19, suggests a multicenter observational study in Italy.
Astrophysicist probes cosmic "dark matter detector"
A CU Boulder astrophysicist is searching the light coming from a distant, and extremely powerful celestial object, for what may be the most elusive substance in the universe: dark matter.
A cancer shredder
Researchers at the universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt (Germany) have developed a new compound for treating cancer.
Finding right drug balance for Parkinson's patients
Parkinson's disease is most commonly treated with levodopa, but the benefits wear off as the disease progresses and high doses can result in dyskinesia, which are involuntary and uncontrollable movements.

Noise can put you off your food
Noise can make or break a dining experience, according to a laboratory study replicating common noise levels in restaurants.
Successful Dartmouth TB vaccine moves forward after phase 2 trial
Results from the Phase 2 trial of the DAR-901 tuberculosis (TB) vaccine were announced today by investigators at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and published in the journal Vaccine.
Scientists found a connection between amino acid metabolism and joint hypermobility in autistic children
A team of researchers found out that children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) have increased levels of the amino acid hydroxyproline.
Genetic gains for better grains
A nutritious millet crop grown mainly in West Africa could be genetically improved for large-scale agriculture in Saudi Arabia.
Validating the physics behind the new MIT-designed fusion experiment
MIT researchers have published seven papers outlining details of the physics behind the ambitious SPARC fusion research experiment being developed by MIT and Commonwealth Fusion Systems.
Scientists present a comprehensive physics basis for a new fusion reactor design
As part of the Journal of Plasma Physics' continuing focus on the scientific progress in fusion physics, the journal editors and Cambridge University Press are proud to present an important Special Issue of JPP, the 'Status of the SPARC Physics Basis'.
Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Feeding rates of blue mussels slow down under ocean acidification conditions, and the cause may be the slowing beat of gill cilia, similar to a known response in human lung cells.
Landmark clinical trial shows effectiveness of oral antibiotics in treating cystic fibrosis condition
A major national study led by experts from Bristol and Nottingham has found that oral antibiotics are just as effective as intravenous antibiotics in killing a common germ that causes dangerous complications in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients.

More accurate modelling of climate change impacts on water resources
To better document the repercussions of climate change on regional water resources, researchers from around the world now have access to HYSETS, a database of hydrometric, meteorological and physiographic data created by a team at the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS), which contains 70 years' worth of data on 14,425 North American watersheds
How everyday speech could transmit viral droplets
High-speed imaging of an individual producing common speech sounds shows that the sudden burst of airflow produced from the articulation of consonants like /p/ or /b/ carry salivary and mucus droplets for at least a meter in front of a speaker.
Scientists got one step closer to solving a major problem of hydrogen energy
A team of scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) together with their colleagues from Austria, Turkey, Slovakia, Russia (MISIS, MSU), and the UK found a way to hydrogenate thin metallic glass layers at room temperature.
Social media use linked with depression, secondary trauma during COVID-19
Can't stop checking social media for the latest COVID-19 health information?
Skoltech research makes it easier to pinpoint brain activity in EEG studies
Skoltech researchers have proposed a fast and accurate numerical method of addressing the problem plaguing electroencephalography (EEG) studies that monitor the brain's electrical activity -- having to laboriously locate the source of EEG signal in the brain due to the low spatial resolution of this method.
Generating renewable hydrogen fuel from the sea
The power of the sun, wind and sea may soon combine to produce clean-burning hydrogen fuel, according to a team of Penn State researchers.
Exosome treatment improves recovery from heart attacks in a preclinical study
Research in pigs shows that using the exosomes naturally produced from a mixture of heart muscle cells, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells -- which were all derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells -- yields regenerative benefits equivalent to the injected human induced pluripotent stem cell-cardiac cells.
Marine biodiversity reshuffles under warmer and sea ice-free Pacific Arctic
Climate warming will alter marine community compositions as species are expected to shift poleward, significantly impacting the Arctic marine ecosystem.
Can the common cold help protect you from COVID-19?
A new study in mBio provides the first evidence that the seasonal colds you've had in the past could protect you from COVID-19.
Forgetting past misdeeds to justify future ones
Proven fact: we remember our altruistic behaviour more easily than selfish actions or misdeeds that go against our own moral sense.
Identified the cellular process by which Cisplatin chemotherapy causes neuronal damage
Cisplatin induces senescence of peripheral neurons through overexpression of the p21 protein, which would explain the neuropathy.
In a field where smaller is better, researchers discover the world's tiniest antibodies
Researchers at the University of Bath in the UK and biopharma company UCB have found a way to produce miniaturised antibodies, opening the way for a potential new class of treatments for diseases.
Nasal calcium rich salts show reduction of exhaled aerosol particles up to 99%
In a paper published in Molecular Frontiers Journal, researchers from Cambridge, Massachusetts have discovered a more effective way of eliminating airborne particles from airways using nasal calcium-rich salts called FEND, which have potential applications in the fight against Covid-19.
Study suggests link between unexplained miscarriages and how women perceive men's body odor
Women who have suffered unexplained repeated pregnancy loss (uRPL) have altered perceptions and brain responses to male body odours, in comparison to those with no history of uRPL, suggests a new study published today in eLife.
Driving behavior less 'robotic' thanks to new Delft model
Researchers from TU Delft have now developed a new model that describes driving behaviour on the basis of one underlying 'human' principle: managing the risk below a threshold level.
Preferences for public allocation of vaccine for COVID-19
This survey study describes the public's preferences for allocating a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.
Blocking enzyme's self-destruction process may mitigate age-related diseases
Stopping the cannibalistic behavior of a well-studied enzyme could be the key to new drugs to fight age-related diseases, according to a new study published online in Nature Cell Biology.
Cannabis data lacking, but machine learning could help
Everyone's heard of THC and CBD. But many other active compounds in cannabis interact to influence its effects.
Filtering radioactive elements from water
Some time ago, ETH researchers developed a filter membrane made out of whey proteins and activated carbon.
Argonne targets lithium-rich materials as key to more sustainable cost-effective batteries
Researchers are developing new ways to advance lithium-rich batteries and using new materials for practical use, according to researchers with the U.S.
Buying emergency contraception is legal but not always easy at small, mom-and-pop pharmacies
Amie Ashcraft has studied the availability and accessibility of emergency contraception in West Virginia pharmacies.
Brain circuitry shaped by competition for space as well as genetics
Complex brain circuits in rodents can organise themselves with genetics playing only a secondary role, according to a new computer modelling study published today in eLife.
Mussels connect antibodies to treat cancer
POSTECH research team develops innovative local anticancer immunotherapy technology using mussel protein.
Study identifies shortcomings in FDA evaluations for new opioid drug approvals over two decades
Approvals of prescription opioids by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over more than two decades have been based on evaluations in narrowly defined patient groups for which certain safety-related outcomes have been rarely systematically assessed.
Gut microbiome may influence how cancer patients respond to oral therapies, study suggests
A new study from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University illustrates how the gut microbiome interacts with an oral medication in prostate cancer patients, suggesting bacteria in the gut play a role in treatment outcomes.
Discovery of cells that heal cardiac damage after infarction
Researchers at Cima and the Clinica Universidad de Navarra (Spain) have led an international study identifying the cardiac cells responsible for repairing the damage to this organ after infarction.
Achieving clean air for all is possible
Air pollution is currently the largest environmental risk factor for human health globally and can be linked to several million cases of premature deaths every year.
Acid reflux drug could help newborn babies recover from brain injury, study suggests
Researchers in China have discovered a potential way to prevent a lack of oxygen or blood flow from causing long-lasting brain damage in newborn children.
Is it one or two species? The case of the cluster anemones
Their scientific name is ''Parazoanthus axinellae'' and they are among the most fascinating corals of the Mediterranean Sea.
Two pesticides approved for use in US harmful to bees
A previously banned insecticide, which was approved for agricultural use last year in the United States, is harmful for bees and other beneficial insects that are crucial for agriculture, and a second pesticide in widespread use also harms these insects.
Plant droplets serve as nutrient-rich food for insects
Small watery droplets on the edges of blueberry bush leaves are loaded with nutrients for many insects, including bees, wasps and flies, according to a Rutgers-led study, the first of its kind.
'I'll sleep when I'm dead': The sleep-deprived masculinity stereotype
In the United States, the average American sleeps less than the minimum seven hours of sleep per night recommended by the Center for Disease Control, and nearly half of Americans report negative consequences from insufficient sleep.
Repeated pregnancy loss may be tied to the olfactory system
Understanding the connection could lead to a new search for the causes of unexplained spontaneous miscarriage
Virus turns deadly fungus from foe to friend in plants
Researchers have discovered that a fungal virus (also called a mycovirus) can convert deadly fungal pathogens into beneficial fungus in rapeseed plants.
Can mobile tech offer new pathways to improve recovery from serious traumatic injuries?
Serious traumatic injuries are a health event that can begin a trajectory toward chronic health and social challenges.
Breast cancer medication risk
New research led by Flinders University has found a link between beta-blockers and survival outcomes in some breast cancer patients.
New technologies link treatments to the patients who need them the most
A suite of new technologies enables researchers in Charleston, South Carolina, to remotely reach smokers throughout the state, allowing them to participate in clinical trials of investigational treatments that could help them quit.
First observation of nutation in magnetic materials
An international team of scientists has managed for the first time to observe the 'nutation' of spins in magnetic materials (the oscillations of their axis during precession).
UC researchers uncover clues for COVID-19 treatment
By examining preexisting research for other conditions, researchers at the University of Cincinnati have found a potential treatment that could be applied to COVID-19.
Cardiac arrhythmias linked to gene mutations
Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias can be linked to the functional and structural consequences of gene mutations.
Why disordered light-harvesting systems produce ordered outcomes
Scientists typically prefer to work with ordered systems. However, a diverse team of physicists and biophysicists from the University of Groningen found that individual light-harvesting nanotubes with disordered molecular structures still transport light energy in the same way.
Common antioxidant enzyme may provide potential treatment for COVID-19
Catalase, a naturally occurring enzyme, holds potential as a low-cost therapeutic drug to treat COVID-19 symptoms and suppress the replication of coronavirus inside the body.
Vessel noise present year-round at Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary
The environment in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of San Francisco is not a refuge from the noise generated by ship traffic, the first underwater marine acoustic study of the region has shown.
Obstructive sleep apnea risk varies in patients with different types of epilepsy
People with generalized epilepsy who have seizures arising from both sides of the brain simultaneously, have a higher risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) compared to patients who have focal epilepsy where seizures emanate from one area of the brain, according to a Rutgers study.
Redefining drought in the US corn belt
As the climate trends warmer and drier, global food security increasingly hinges on crops' ability to withstand drought.
Why do veterans take their own lives? New study finds surprising answers
A George Mason University study of US veterans found that while social determinants of health - like homelessness, social isolation, or unemployment -- can predict suicide, they are not the cause of it.
Novel Drosophila-based disease model to study human intellectual disability syndrome
The researchers from the TalTech molecular neurobiology laboratory headed by professor Tõnis Timmusk used the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster to develop a novel disease model for Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS).
A revised map of where working memory resides in the brain
Findings from genetically diverse mice challenge long-held assumptions about how the brain is able to briefly hold onto important information.
In deadly COVID-19 lung inflammation, BU researchers discover a culprit in NFkB
In Deadly COVID-19 Lung Inflammation, BU Researchers Discover a Culprit in NFkB Pathway.Team now searching for a therapeutic that could block NFkB from unleashing unchecked inflammation at the onset of coronavirus infection.
Drug found to correct gene defect that causes immune-driven gut leakiness
A team of researchers led by biomedical scientist Declan McCole at the University of California, Riverside, has found that the drug tofacitinib, also called Xeljanz and approved by the FDA to treat rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis, can repair permeability defects in the intestine.
Sensational COVID-19 communication erodes confidence in science
Scientists, policymakers and the media should acknowledge inherent uncertainties in epidemiological models projecting the spread of COVID-19 and avoid ''catastrophizing'' worst-case scenarios, according to new research from Cornell University.
Vanderbilt wearable exosuit that lessens muscle fatigue could redesign the future of work
Zelik and team demonstrate how a clothing-like exoskeleton can reduce back muscle fatigue and providing needed physical relief to material handlers, medical professionals and frontline workers.
Clinical screening for COVID-19 in asymptomatic patients with cancer
A repeated testing protocol for COVID-19 among patients with cancer was examined in this quality improvement study.
Are China's pollution remediation efforts making the planet warmer?
A 10-year effort by China to improve air quality and reduce pollution-related health risks has caused warming in areas across the northern hemisphere, according to new work published in Environmental Research Letters.
Changes in adult alcohol use, consequences during COVID-19 pandemic
Individual-level changes in alcohol use and the consequences associated with alcohol use by US adults from before to during the COVID-19 pandemic are examined in this study.
Women received less aggressive care than men after a heart attack with pumping failure
Researchers found that when a heart attack was complicated by cardiogenic shock, women ages 18-55 years were 11% more likely to die in the hospital than men the same age.
Science and scientists held in high esteem across global publics
A new Pew Research Center survey conducted in 20 publics around the world examining global trust in scientists and international views of various scientific topics, including climate change and the environment, vaccines, and artificial intelligence.
Harnessing big data and artificial intelligence to predict future pandemic spread
During COVID-19, artificial intelligence (AI) has been used to enhance diagnostic efforts, deliver medical supplies and even assess risk factors from blood tests.
New fire containment research addresses risk and safety
A team from Colorado State University and USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station address new ways to assess risks and evaluate fire fighting effectiveness.
INRS researchers develop a new membraneless fuel cell
The research team of INRS (Institut national de la recherche scientifique) professor Mohamed Mohamedi has designed a green membraneless fuel cell that uses oxygen from the air.
Students used their mobile phones for over 8 hours a day during lockdown
The study relates the number of hours that young people spend sitting down, their level of physical activity and state of mind when using a mobile phone.
New genetic knowledge on the causes of severe COVID-19
A proportion of the most severe COVID-19 cases can be explained by genetic defects in the patients' immune system.
Lessons from a cooling climate
Usually, talk of carbon sequestration focuses on plants: forests storing carbon in the trunks of massive trees, algae blooming and sinking to the seabed, or perhaps peatlands locking carbon away for tens of thousands of years.
Kawasaki disease is not a homogenous disease nor are its triggers
Researchers at UC San Diego report that while Kawasaki disease occurs in clusters, the traits, and thus the triggers of the inflammatory disease vary among clusters.
Welsh-medium school pupils underperform in tests despite more advantaged backgrounds
Secondary schools in Wales that teach pupils through the medium of Welsh are outperformed by their English-speaking counterparts in maths, reading and science tests, according to a new study by Lancaster University.
New research provides clues on optimizing cell defenses when viruses attack
Researchers studying interferons, immune response proteins released naturally by human cells when viruses are detected, have uncovered new details on the mechanisms underlying cell defenses.
Unknowns and uncertainties raise ethical concerns for UK egg freezing
A lack of clear, accessible, and transparent data creates a series of ethical issues for egg freezing, according to a new briefing note from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics.
Computer model shows how COVID-19 could lead to runaway inflammation
New study addresses a mystery first raised in March: Why do some people with COVID-19 develop severe inflammation?
Facile synthesis of quinoline in water
This review summarizes an overview of the synthesis and functionalisation of quinoline scaffolds in aqueous medium.
Alcohol consumption rises sharply during pandemic shutdown
Anecdotal information has suggested that people are buying and consuming more alcohol during the pandemic shutdown.
New NH poll: Biden leads Trump in run for president
Former Vice President Joe Biden has an eight-point lead over President Donald Trump among likely New Hampshire voters, according to a new poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion.
NUS researchers solve decades-old problem of how to uniformly switch memristors
An international team, led by the scientists from the National University of Singapore, has developed a solution to uniformly switch memristors.
New Texas poll: Trump up in close race
President Donald Trump has an apparent lead over former Vice President Joe Biden in a close contest for Texas' 38 electoral votes according to a new poll of likely voters in the state released today.
Under-regulated pet trade leaves thousands of species vulnerable
In a recent study, researchers from Thailand's Suranaree University of Technology and the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) revealed a worrying situation where a huge number of reptile species are being exploited, with little international regulation, implying a lack of reliable a priori estimates of the impact on wild populations.
First 'pathoconnectome' could point toward new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases
Scientists from the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah have achieved another first in the field of connectomics, which studies the synaptic connections between neurons.
Genetic risk of developing obesity is driven by variants that affect the brain
Some people are at higher risk of developing obesity because they possess genetic variants that affect how the brain processes sensory information and regulates feeding and behavior.
Prototype graft, designed to replace damaged heart vessels, shows promise in cell study
North Carolina State University researchers reported promising preclinical findings for a prototype of a vascular graft designed as a replacement for a damaged or blocked coronary artery, which supplies blood to the heart.
New method developed to help scientists understand how the brain processes color
Through the development of new technology, University of Minnesota researchers have developed a method that allows scientists to understand how a fruit fly's brain responds to seeing color.
Smart cruise control steers drivers toward better decisions
Smart cruise control, better human decisions. Michigan Tech engineers study how cars and trucks move cooperatively on the road, respond to each other's environmental sensors and react as a group to lessen traffic jams and protect the humans inside.
Many ventilation systems may increase risk of COVID-19 exposure, study suggests
Ventilation systems in many modern office buildings, which are designed to keep temperatures comfortable and increase energy efficiency, may increase the risk of exposure to the coronavirus, particularly during the coming winter, according to research published in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics.
In the arctic, extreme air pollution kills trees, limits growth by reducing sunlight
At the most heavily polluted site on Earth, dendroecology, dendrochemistry, and process-based forward modelling were used to explore the relationship of tree growth and mortality with industrial pollution.
Volcanic ash could help reduce CO2 associated with climate change
University of Southampton scientists investigating ways of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases from our atmosphere believe volcanic ash could play an important role.
NASA's infrared view of typhoon Kujira
NASA's Terra satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Typhoon Kujira as it tracked through the northwestern Pacific Ocean.
Deep learning model provides rapid detection of stroke-causing blockages
A sophisticated type of artificial intelligence (AI) called deep learning can help rapidly detect blockages in the arteries that supply blood to the head, potentially speeding the onset of life-saving treatment, according to a study.
VirScan offers new insights into COVID-19 antibody response
VirScan, a technology that can determine which of more than 1,000 different viruses have infected a person, can now also detect evidence of infection from coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2.
Evolution of pine needles helps trees cope with rainfall impact
If you have been surrounded by the sight and smell of pine trees, you may have taken a closer look at the needles and then wondered how their properties are influenced by rainfall.
Computer model explains altered decision making in schizophrenia
Scientists have built a computer 'brain circuit', or artificial neural network, that mirrors human decision-making processes and sheds light on how circuits might be altered in psychiatric diseases.
China's air pollutant reduction success could make it tougher to control climate change
China's success in improving air quality by cutting polluting emissions may have a negative knock-on effect on climate change overall, a new study has found.
Understanding the effect of aging on the genome
EPFL scientists have measured the molecular footprint that aging leaves on various mouse and human tissues.
Untapped potential exists for blending hydropower, floating PV
Hybrid systems of floating solar panels and hydropower plants may hold the technical potential to produce a significant portion of the electricity generated annually across the globe, according to an analysis by researchers at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
New NC poll: Biden and Trump tied
President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden are deadlocked in the race for North Carolina's 15 electoral votes, according to a new poll released today.
Microwaves are useful to combine amino acids with hetero-steroids
Aza-steroids are important class of compounds because of their numerous biological activities.
Preheating gelatin as a facile approach to increase 3D printing duration
SUTD researchers' new approach finds that preheating gelatin extended its 3D printing time compared to freshly prepared gelatin and enhanced the printability of the ink, which is essential for extrusion-based bioprinting and food printing.
Prostate cancer: immunotherapy offers hope
An antibody for treating advanced prostate cancer improves progression-free survival in patients with metastasised, castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Researchers create artificial lung to support pre-term babies in distress
An international team led by current and former McMaster University researchers has developed an artificial lung to support pre-term and other newborn babies in respiratory distress.
The secretive networks used to move money offshore
The researchers at USC have made some discoveries about the network behind the Panama Papers, uncovering uniquely fragmented network behavior and transactions.
More than 90% of driver's license suspensions are not related to traffic safety
A study conducted found that the vast majority of license suspensions are for non-driving-related events, such as failure to pay a fine or appear in court, and that these suspensions disproportionately affect those living in low-income communities and in communities with a greater percentage of Black and Hispanic residents.
Inflammatory gene provides clue to obesity risk
A gene that helps to control inflammation increases the risk of obesity and could be turned off in mice to stop weight gain, a study from The University of Queensland has found.
Discovery enables adult skin to regenerate like a newborn's
A newly identified genetic factor allows adult skin to repair itself like the skin of a newborn.
Microcomb-injected pulsed lasers as variable microwave gears
Optical frequency combs can link frequencies in the microwave domain to high-purity laser emissions, yielding unprecedented precision in time-keeping and metrology.
Potential for natural forest regrowth to capture carbon
A major new study that maps potential aboveground carbon accumulation rates for forest regrowth across the globe.
An in-depth analysis of antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2
Using a technology called VirScan to study coronavirus antibody responses in a large cohort of SARS-CoV-2-infected and control individuals, researchers identified epitopes recognized by a large fraction of COVID-19 patients, epitopes cross-reactive with antibodies developed in response to other human coronaviruses, and 10 epitopes likely recognized by neutralizing antibodies.
Vitamin D deficiency leads to obesity, stunted growth in zebrafish
Using a zebrafish model, researchers have found that vitamin D deficiency during early development can disrupt the metabolic balance between growth and fat accumulation.
'Cool' sampling sites more likely to show false trends
Data collected by citizen science initiatives, museums and national parks is an important basis for research on biodiversity change.
Study: Childhood chemo alters heart's caretaker cells
Why do 20% of children who receive cancer chemotherapy go on to develop heart failure later in life?
Study supports airborne spread of COVID-19 indoors
New research from the University of Georgia supports growing evidence for airborne transmission of COVID-19 in enclosed spaces.

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