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Today's Science News and Current Events


Argonne to install Comanche system to explore ARM technology for HPC
Argonne National Laboratory is collaborating with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) to provide system software expertise and a development ecosystem for a future high-performance computing (HPC) system based on 64-bit ARM processors.
Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized
A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer.
Warmer water signals change for Scotland's shags
An increasingly catholic diet among European shags at one of Scotland's best-studied breeding colonies has been linked to long-term climate change and may have important implications for Scotland's seabirds.
The tragedy of the seagrass commons
Urgent action is required to stem the loss of the world's seagrass meadows to protect their associated fisheries.
Researchers tunnel to a new light source
The Ohio State University researchers, with scientists at Wright State University and Naval Research Laboratory, describe a promising new semiconductor LED made with GaN-based materials that could boost wallsocket efficiency by reducing energy losses and self-heating.
Cardiorespiratory fitness is essential to reduce risk of coronary heart disease
Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a leading cause of death for men in the US.
Evaluation of novel hybrid membranes for carbon capture
Hybrid materials known as mixed matrix membranes are considered a promising approach to capture carbon dioxide and mitigate against global warming.
Scientists capture colliding organic nanoparticles on video for first time
A Northwestern University research team is the first to capture on video organic nanoparticles colliding and fusing together.
The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change
Leipzig. Forests fulfil numerous important functions, and do so particularly well if they are rich in different species of trees.
A popular tool to trace Earth's oxygen history can give false positives
If someone cries 'Eureka!' because it looks like oxygen appeared in Earth's ancient atmosphere long before the body of evidence indicated, be careful.
Novel therapeutic target discovered for estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer
Mount Sinai researchers identify new protein in a common subtype of breast cancer which can potentially offer more effective therapies for the future.
Investigating patterns of degeneration in Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known to cause memory loss and cognitive decline, but other functions of the brain can remain intact.
These ring-tailed lemurs raise a 'stink' when they flirt with potential mates
Stink-flirting among ring-tailed lemurs come at a cost, but may also influence females in choosing a mate.
Asthma attacks reduced in tree-lined urban neighborhoods
People living in polluted urban areas are far less likely to be admitted to hospital with asthma when there are lots of trees in their neighborhood, a study by the University of Exeter's medical school has found.
Vaginal progesterone reduces preterm birth and neonatal complications in women with a mid-trimester short cervix
Prematurity is the main complication of pregnancy, and 15 million babies are born preterm worldwide each year.
Risk of distracted driving predicted by age, gender, personality and driving frequency
The first study of how personal traits affect driver distraction finds that young men, extroverted or neurotic people, and people who drive more often are more likely to report being distracted during driving, while older women and those who feel they could control their distracted behavior are less likely to report distraction.
A sub-desert savanna spread across Madrid fourteen million years ago
The current landscape of Madrid city and its vicinity was really different 14 million years ago.
Surrey develops new 'supercatalyst' to recycle carbon dioxide and methane
The University of Surrey has developed a new and cost-effective catalyst to recycle two of the main causes behind climate change -- carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4).
Dog ownership linked to lower mortality
A team of Swedish scientists have used national registries of more than 3.4 million Swedes aged 40 to 80 to study the association between dog ownership and cardiovascular health.
Water world
Following the path of radicals and being able to identify many damaged residues because of incredibly accurate, expeditious and sensitive mass spectrometry, three scientists studied the great granddaddy of all photosynthetic organisms -- a strain of cyanobacteria -- to develop the first experimental map of that organism's water world.
Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war
Researchers from Rice University, UCLA, Michigan State and the University of New Mexico have discovered a planetary-scale tug-of-war between life, deep Earth and the upper atmosphere that is expressed in atmospheric nitrogen.
Research shows drones could help crop management take off
Initial results of an ongoing study show that aerial imagery produced by multi-spectral sensors as well as less-expensive digital cameras may improve accuracy and efficiency of plant stand assessment in cotton.
What grosses out a chimpanzee?
Chimps show increased latencies to feed, and tendencies to maintain greater distances from possible contaminants and/or outright refusals to consume food in test conditions, hinting at the origins of disgust in humans.
Mathematician's study of 'swarmalators' could direct future science
How does the Japanese tree frog figure into the latest work of noted mathematician Steven Strogatz?
Like a baby: The vicious cycle of childhood obesity and snoring
In a new longitudinal observational study, scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) looked at the relationships among maternal snoring, childhood snoring and children's metabolic characteristics -- including body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance, which reflects future risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease -- in approximately 1,100 children followed from gestation through early adolescence.
Small changes to organ procurement system could lead to more life-saving transplants
Slight changes to the system for allocating deceased-donor kidneys could result in higher rates of organ procurement and lead to more kidney transplants across the country, according to new research co-authored by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor.
New computational method provides optimized design of wind up toys
A team of leading computer scientists has developed a novel computational system to aid the design and fabrication of wind-up toys, focusing on automating the intricate interior machinery responsible for the toys' wind-up motion.
First-graders fitter than expected
Childhood obesity is often attributed to a lack of exercise.
eDNA tool detects invasive clams before they become a nuisance
When seeking a cure for a disease, early detection is often the key.
Scientific advances can make it easier to recycle plastics
Researchers report new approaches could dramatically increase the amount of plastic waste that can be successfully recycled.
Study analyzes mutations in cerebrospinal fluid in lung cancer with brain metastases
Researchers have explored the analysis of mutations in cerebrospinal fluid of lung cancer patients with brain metastases in a study presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress.
Anti-malaria drug shows promise as Zika virus treatment
California researchers have discovered that a medication used to prevent and treat malaria may also be effective for Zika virus.
Performance appraisal success depends on frequent feedback and good standard setting
Appraisal of employees often gets a bad press, but recent research suggests if it involves frequent feedback between the formal appraisal and good prior planning and communication of standards then it can be successful and appreciated by employees.
Hibernating ground squirrels provide clues to new stroke treatments
In the fight against brain damage caused by stroke, researchers have turned to an unlikely source of inspiration: hibernating ground squirrels.
RUDN chemists synthesized a new catalyst for oil and gas processing
A team of scientists from the Research Institute of Chemistry of RUDN University together with colleagues from major scientific centers created a new catalyst -- a substance that activates oxidation processes in low-reactive components of oil and gas.
Brain activity buffers against worsening anxiety
Boosting activity in brain areas related to thinking and problem-solving may also protect against worsening anxiety, suggests a new study by Duke University scientists.
Decrease in sunshine, increase in rickets
A University of Toronto student and professor have teamed up to discover that Britain's increasing cloudiness during the summer could be an important reason for the mysterious increase in rickets among British children over the past few decades.
Breakthrough could launch organic electronics beyond cell phone screens
A discovery by an international team of researchers from Princeton University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Humboldt University in Berlin points the way to more widespread use of an advanced technology generally known as organic electronics.
University of Guelph professor identifies protein key to cancer cells ability to spread
U of G scientists have made a discovery that could reduce the spread of cancer by hindering a protein that binds cancer cells together and allows them to invade tissues.
Age and gut bacteria contribute to MS disease progression, according to Rutgers
Gut bacteria at a young age can contribute to multiple sclerosis disease onset and progression.
Inner clock: Biologists research the mechanism of an auxiliary clock
In December, the Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology will be awarded for the identification of genes that control the inner clock.
Carbon emissions by plant respiration will have large impact on climate
New findings by researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences, who partnered with scientists from across the world, suggest plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warn that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning.
No more deer in the headlight: Study finds large mammals do use road crossing structures
A pilot study finds that large mammals are more likely to use wildlife crossing structures than move past a random location in the surrounding habitat.
Interstellar space probes: Where's the brakes?!
With a miniaturised space probe capable of being accelerated to a quarter of the speed of light, we could reach Alpha Centauri, our nearest star, in 20 to 50 years.
Taking a spin on plasma space tornadoes with NASA observations
New NASA mission results show that tornado-like swirls of space plasma create tumultuous boundaries in the near-Earth environment, letting dangerous high-energy particles slip into near Earth space.
Flu vaccine prevents hospitalization in children
Children vaccinated against influenza are significantly less likely to experience serious complications from the virus that could land them in hospital, new research from Public Health Ontario (PHO) and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) has found.
NIR-driven H2 evolution from water: Expanding wavelength range for solar energy conversion
A Japanese research team at Kyushu University synthesized a compound that absorbs near-infrared light to produce hydrogen from water.
Carefully crafted light pulses control neuron activity
Specially tailored, ultrafast pulses of light can trigger neurons to fire and could one day help patients with light-sensitive circadian or mood problems, according to a new study in mice at the University of Illinois.
New study out of WSU further supports use of progesterone to fight preterm birth
A new study published today -- World Prematurity Day -- in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology provides additional support for treatment with vaginal progesterone to reduce the risk of preterm birth, neonatal complications and infant death in pregnant women with a short cervix.
When male voles drink alcohol, but their partner doesn't, their relationship suffers
Researchers find that the relationship between prairie vole couples suffers when the male has access to alcohol, but his female partner doesn't - similar to what has been observed in human couples.
Infrared NASA imagery shows development of Tropical Depression 31W
NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of the latest tropical cyclone in the South China Sea.
Semiconducting carbon nanotubes can reduce noise in carbon nanotube interconnects
This paper presents reduction of crosstalk and noise in CNT bundle interconnects.
The future of cell culture: A new continuous bioprocess developed
Scientists at Newcastle University, UK have developed a revolutionary technique to allow the continuous production and collection of cells.
Electrochemistry opens up novel access to important classes of substances
Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have succeeded in overcoming the problem of electrochemical polymer formation and in developing a sustainable and efficient synthesis strategy for these important products for the first time.
When to fish: Timing matters for fish that migrate to reproduce
A new University of Washington study points to yet another human factor that is hampering the ability of fish to reproduce: the timing of our fishing seasons.
Not an illusion: Clever use of mirrors boosts performance of light-sheet microscope
Using a simple 'mirror trick' and not-so-simple computational analysis, scientists affiliated with the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have considerably improved the speed, efficiency, and resolution of a light-sheet microscope, with broad applications for enhanced imaging of live cells and embryos.
A walk at the mall or the park? New study shows, for moms and daughters, a walk in the park is best
University of Illinois family studies researchers believed that if the attention restoration theory, which describes how interaction with natural environments can reduce mental fatigue and restore attention, worked for individuals it might also work for families to help facilitate more positive family interactions and family cohesion.
Seagrass is a key fishing ground globally
New research demonstrates that seagrass meadows are important fishing grounds all around the globe.
ALEX study shows alectinib 600 mg more effective than crizotinib in Asian cancer patients
A subanalysis of the phase III ALEX study has shown that alectinib 600 mg twice daily is more effective than standard of care crizotinib in Asian patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress.
Strain-free epitaxy of germanium film on mica
Germanium was the material of choice in the early history of electronic devices, and due to its high charge carrier mobility, it's making a comeback.
New theory rewrites opening moments of Chernobyl disaster
A brand-new theory of the opening moments during the Chernobyl disaster, the most severe nuclear accident in history, based on additional analysis is presented for the first time in the journal Nuclear Technology, an official journal of the American Nuclear Society.
How a poorly explored immune cell may impact cancer immunity and immunotherapy
The immune cells that are trained to fight off the body's invaders can become defective.
BfR supports EFSA and ECHA with the development of European guidelines for the health assessment of endocrine disruptors
On behalf of the European Food Safety Authority, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment hosted a hearing of experts on the practicability of hormone measurements in toxicological studies in Berlin on Oct.
Professor publishes archaeological research on social inequality
The origins of social inequality might lie in the remnants of ancient Eurasia's agricultural societies, according to an article recently published in the major science journal Nature.
A mom's support helps a child learn to handle negative emotions, but what if mom is distressed?
When children become upset, showing negative emotions or behaviors, some parents become distressed, while others are able to talk their child through the difficult situation.
Brain astrocytes linked to Alzheimer's disease
Astrocytes, the supporting cells of the brain, could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland.
Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning.
Anti-tumor and Immune-potentiating Enterococcus faecalis-2001 β-glucans
Background: Enterococcus faecalis 2001 is a probiotic lactic acid bacterium and has been used as a biological response modifier (BRM).

Best Science Podcasts 2017

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2017. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Simple Solutions
Sometimes, the best solutions to complex problems are simple. But simple doesn't always mean easy. This hour, TED speakers describe the innovation and hard work that goes into achieving simplicity. Guests include designer Mileha Soneji, chef Sam Kass, sleep researcher Wendy Troxel, public health advocate Myriam Sidibe, and engineer Amos Winter.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#448 Pavlov (Rebroadcast)
This week, we're learning about the life and work of a groundbreaking physiologist whose work on learning and instinct is familiar worldwide, and almost universally misunderstood. We'll spend the hour with Daniel Todes, Ph.D, Professor of History of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University, discussing his book "Ivan Pavlov: A Russian Life in Science."