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Experts urge evaluation of diet at routine check-ups
Unhealthy dietary patterns are a leading cause of heart disease and stroke as well as other chronic diseases.
NASA sounding rocket finds helium structures in sun's atmosphere
Helium is the second most abundant element in the universe after hydrogen.
Test accurately IDs people whose gonorrhea can be cured with simple oral antibiotic
A test designed by UCLA researchers can pinpoint which people with gonorrhea will respond successfully to the inexpensive oral antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which had previously been sidelined over concerns the bacterium that causes the infection was becoming resistant to it.
Adding another dimension to a cell culture model for pulmonary arterial hypertension
Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare disease in which excessive proliferation of the cells of pulmonary arterial walls obstructs the blood flow in the lungs.

Scientists develop principles for the creation of an "acoustic diode"
In research published in Science Advances, a group led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS) have used a principle, ''magneto-rotation coupling,'' to suppress the transmission of sound waves on the surface of a film in one direction while allowing them to travel in the other.
The costs and benefits of addressing customer complaints
Developing a strategy to achieve an optimal recovery-loyalty yield is more advantageous than adopting the mantra that the customer is always right.
Authors' 'invisible' words reveal blueprint for storytelling
The ''invisible'' words that shaped Dickens classics also lead audiences through Spielberg dramas.
Measuring electron emission from irradiated biomolecules
Through a study published in EPJ D, researchers have successfully determined the characteristics of electron emission when high-velocity ions collide with adenine - one of the four key nucleobases of DNA.
NSD2 enzyme appears to prevent cellular senescence
Using comprehensive genetic analysis, Kumamoto University researchers have found, for the first time, that the NSD2 enzyme blocks cell aging.
Success in promoting plant growth for biodiesel
Scientists of Waseda University in Japan succeeded in promoting plant growth and increasing seed yield by heterologous expression of protein from Arabidopsis (artificially modified high-speed motor protein) in Camelina sativa, which is expected as a useful plant for biodiesel.

Russian developers created a platform for self-testing of AI medical services
Experts from the Center for Diagnostics and Telemedicine have developed a platform for self-testing services which is based on artificial intelligence and designed for medical tasks, such as for analyzing diagnostic images.
Florida current is weaker now than at any point in the past century
A key component of the Gulf Stream has markedly slowed over the past century--that's the conclusion of a new research paper in Nature Communications published on August 7, 2020.
COVID-19 may have a longer incubation period, suggests probability analysis of Wuhan cases
By applying the renewal theory in probability to reduce recall bias in initial case reports, scientists have come up with a new estimate for the incubation period of COVID-19.
Inexpensive, accessible device provides visual proof that masks block droplets
In a proof-of-concept study appearing online Aug. 7 in the journal Science Advances, Fischer, Westman and colleagues report that the simple, low-cost technique provided visual proof that face masks are effective in reducing droplet emissions during normal wear.
New reporter mouse strain offers powerful genetic tool to identify P2X2-expressing cells
University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine researchers created a reporter mouse strain in pursuit of a new way to answer an old question: Is purinergic receptor gene P2X2 expressed in particular populations of sensory nerve cells?
Origins of life: Chemical evolution in a tiny Gulf Stream
Chemical reactions driven by the geological conditions on the early Earth might have led to the prebiotic evolution of self-replicating molecules.

Researchers discover how plants distinguish beneficial from harmful microbes
Plants recognize beneficial microbes and keep harmful ones out, which is important for healthy plants production and global food security.
Researchers find link between Atlantic hurricanes and weather system in East Asia
Climate researchers led by the University of Iowa have found a link between hurricanes that form in the Atlantic Ocean - and threaten the United States - and a weather system in East Asia.
Pinpointing the cells that keep the body's master circadian clock ticking
UT Southwestern scientists have developed a genetically engineered mouse and imaging system that lets them visualize fluctuations in the circadian clocks of cell types in mice.
Skoltech supercomputer helps scientists reveal most influential parameters for crop
Skoltech researchers have used the supercomputer to perform a very precise sensitivity analysis to reveal crucial parameters for different crop yields in the chernozem region of Russia, famous for its high-quality, fertile soil.
Strong link found between abnormal liver tests and poor COVID-19 outcomes
New Haven, Conn. -- Researchers at the Yale Liver Center found that patients with COVID-19 presented with abnormal liver tests at much higher rates than suggested by earlier studies.
COVID-19 crisis exposes imbalance in EU state aid for aviation sector
Dr Steven Truxal, an aviation law expert in The City Law School, says state aid offered to airlines in response to the current crisis raises questions around unfair competition between European carriers and may be the subject of future challenge by carriers outside the EU.
Transgender and gender-diverse individuals more likely to be autistic
Transgender and gender-diverse adults are three to six times more likely as cisgender adults (individuals whose gender identity corresponds to their sex assigned at birth) to be diagnosed as autistic, according to a new study by scientists at the University of Cambridge's Autism Research Centre.

Machine learning research may help find new tungsten deposits in SW England
Geologists have developed a machine learning technique that highlights the potential for further deposits of the critical metal tungsten in SW England.
Renewables in Europe: Land requirements can be reduced at low cost
Transitioning our energy supply from coal, oil and gas to wind and solar power is feasible.
Stellar egg hunt with ALMA
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) took a census of stellar eggs in the constellation Taurus and revealed their evolution state.
Lead poisoning could reduce gene expression in humans
Scientists have unveiled a correlation between high blood lead levels in children and methylation of genes involved in haem synthesis and carcinogenesis, indicating a previously unknown mechanism for lead poisoning.
A titanate nanowire mask that can eliminate pathogens
Researchers in Lásló Forró's lab at EPFL, Switzerland, are working on a membrane made of titanium oxide nanowires, similar in appearance to filter paper but with antibacterial and antiviral properties.
Newly discovered mutation could point to heart disease therapeutic target
New work identifies a potential therapeutic target for clogged arteries and other health risks that stem from an excess of harmful fats in the bloodstream.
Heart attack case rates, treatment approaches, outcomes during COVID-19 pandemic
The increases and decreases in patient volume and associated changes in treatment experienced by individuals presenting with acute heart attack (myocardial infarction) before and immediately after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic are examined in this observational study.
The Last unknown
New research reveals that New Guinea is the world's richest island for plants.

Genetic cause of congenital malformation discovered
Spontaneous mutations of a single gene are likely to cause serious developmental disorders of the excretory organs and genitalia.
Making N-C bond directly from N2: summary and perspective
N-Containing organic compounds are of vital importance to lives. Practical and catalytic synthesis of valuable N-containing organic compounds directly from dinitrogen (N2), not through ammonia (NH3), is a holy-grail in chemistry and chemical industry.
New Zealand's Southern Alps glacier melt has doubled
Glaciers in the Southern Alps of New Zealand have lost more ice mass since pre-industrial times than remains today, according to a new study led by the University of Leeds.
COVID-19 - The virus and the vasculature
In severe cases of COVID-19, the infection can lead to obstruction of the blood vessels in the lung, heart and kidneys.
Epirubicin-loaded nanomedicines beat immune checkpoint blockade resistance in glioblastoma
A nanomedicine-based strategy for chemo-immunotherapy (CIT) of glioblastoma (GBM), which has the worst prognosis among brain tumors, was successfully developed.
Integration of gene regulatory networks in understanding animal behavior
For years, scientists have attributed animal behavior to the coordinated activities of neuronal cells and its circuits of neurons, known as the neuronal network (NN).
Heavier smoking linked to skyrocketing health risks
Each cigarette smoked a day by heavier smokers increases the risk of contracting some diseases by more than 30 per cent, according to a new international study published today.
Why do so many refugees move after arrival? Opportunity and community
Many refugees in the United States move to a different state soon after arrival, according to a new dataset on nearly 450,000 people who were resettled between 2000 and 2014.
Potentially predictive humoral immune response markers in COVID-19 patients
Results of partnership between the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard and UW Medicine identify five markers of the humoral immune response that may be able to predict COVID-19 patient outcomes.
Highly sensitive dopamine detector uses 2D materials
A supersensitive dopamine detector can help in the early diagnosis of several disorders that result in too much or too little dopamine, according to a group led by Penn State and including Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and universities in China and Japan.
Does physician burnout, depression, career satisfaction differ by race/ethnicity?
This survey study of US physicians examined whether there were differences by race/ethnicity in burnout, symptoms of depression, career satisfaction and work-life balance.
Scientists use CRISPR to knock down gene messages early in development
Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City, Missouri, and the Andalusian Center of Developmental Biology at Pablo de Olavide University in Seville, Spain, have harnessed the technology to target gene messages (messenger RNA) involved in early vertebrate development.
Materials science researchers develop first electrically injected laser
Materials science researchers have demonstrated the first electrically injected laser made with germanium tin.
Oldest enzyme in cellular respiration isolated
Researchers from Goethe University have found what is perhaps the oldest enzyme in cellular respiration.
Layer of nanoparticles could improve LED performance and lifetime
Adding a layer of nanoparticles to LED designs could help them produce more light for the same energy, and also increase their lifetime.
Novel approach reduces SCA1 symptoms in animal model
Manipulating a novel mechanism that regulates ATXN1 levels reduced ATXN1 and improved some of the symptoms of neurodegenerative disease SCA1 in animal models.
New-generation CO2 gas separation system using gate-type adsorbents
Scientists in Japan designed a gate-type adsorbent tower system that captures and separates mixed gases, CO2, to enable lowering greenhouse gas emissions from industrial sources.
Intranasal vaccine platform has potential for more effective vaccines, fewer side effects
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on vaccine development.
Hubble makes the first observation of a total lunar eclipse by a space telescope
Taking advantage of a total lunar eclipse, astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have detected ozone in Earth's atmosphere.
Scientists introduce FlowRACS for high-throughput discovery of enzymes
Researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have now developed a flow mode Raman-activated cell sorter (RACS), called FlowRACS, to support high-throughput discovery of enzymes and their cell factories, at the precision of just one microbial cell.
Updating Turing's model of pattern formation
Research published in EPJ B revisits the Turing instability mechanism; proving mathematically how the instabilities which give rise to patterns can occur through simple reactions, and in widely varied environmental conditions.
Sugar-based signature identifies T cells where HIV hides despite antiretroviral therapy
Wistar scientists may have discovered a new way of identifying and targeting hidden HIV viral reservoirs during treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART).
Chemotherapy for rare cancer fine-tuned with organoids
A patient-specific tumor organoid model developed at Wake Forest is being used to identify the most effective chemotherapy protocol to treat appendix and colon tumors, a personalized medicine approach that is showing promise.
COVID recovery choices shape future climate
A new international study, led by the University of Leeds, warns that even with some lockdown measures staying in place to the end of 2021, without more structural interventions global temperatures will only be roughly 0.01°C lower than expected by 2030.
Study finds parents can help kids eat healthier by knowing their own sense of self-control
Young children naturally like sugar and salt in food and develop food preferences based on what their parents serve them, but new research suggests that how parents view self-regulation also is a contributing factor.
Smartwatch tracks medication levels to personalize treatments
Engineers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and their colleagues at Stanford School of Medicine have demonstrated that drug levels inside the body can be tracked in real time using a custom smartwatch that analyzes the chemicals found in sweat.
Subpolar marginal seas play a key role in making the subarctic Pacific nutrient-rich
A group of researchers from three Japanese universities has discovered why the western subarctic Pacific Ocean, which accounts for only 6 percent of the world's oceans, produces an estimated 26 percent of the world's marine resources.
Simple approach tested in small group visually evaluates mask effectiveness against viral droplets
Using inexpensive and widely available tools, scientists have developed a simple approach to visually evaluate how effectively different types of masks prevent the spread of droplets that could contain SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, according to a new study.
Alport syndrome: Research highlights link between genotype and treatment effectiveness
A large-scale analysis of the clinical characteristics of Alport syndrome in Japanese patients has revealed for the first time in the world that the effectiveness of existing treatment with ACE inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers (RAS inhibitors) varies depending on the type of mutation in the syndrome's causal gene (COL4A5).
Huge ring-like structure on Ganymede's surface may have been caused by violent impact
Image data reanalysis by researchers from Kobe University and the National Institute of Technology, Oshima College have revealed that ancient tectonic troughs are concentrically distributed across almost the entire surface of Ganymede.
New test better predicts which babies will develop type 1 diabetes
A new approach to predicting which babies will develop type 1 diabetes moves a step closer to routine testing for newborns which could avoid life-threatening complications.

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