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Lung inflammation from childhood asthma linked with later anxiety
Persistent lung inflammation may be one possible explanation for why having asthma during childhood increases your risk for developing anxiety later in life, according to Penn State researchers.
Study: Exercise may delay cognitive decline in people with rare Alzheimer's disease
For individuals carrying a genetic mutation that causes Alzheimer's disease, engaging in at least 2.5 hours of physical activity per week may have beneficial effects on markers of Alzheimer's disease brain changes and may delay cognitive decline, according to a new study.
Schoolyard tree cover predicts math performance in high-poverty urban schools
What if improving academic performance in some of the nation's most disadvantaged and lowest-achieving schools was as easy as planting trees in the schoolyard?
New drug blocks pancreatic cancer growth in mice, study finds
A newly developed drug can prevent the most common type of pancreatic cancer from growing and spreading in laboratory mice, according to a study led by Cedars-Sinai.
Genome duplication drives evolution of species
Polyploid plants have a duplicate set of chromosomes. As a result, large-scale genetic changes are therefore possible in the new species, making it more adaptable in comparison with the parental species, as has now been proven by UZH researchers with rockcress.
Illegal ivory dealers starting to use similar code words to hide online sales
Ivory sellers in Europe using eBay are using the same code words across different languages to covertly advertise items for sale, potentially making it easier for law enforcement agencies to uncover such activities by reducing the number of phrases they have to track.
Artificial intelligence to improve drug combination design & personalized medicine
A new auto-commentary looks at how an emerging area of artificial intelligence, specifically the analysis of small systems-of-interest specific datasets, can be used to improve drug development and personalized medicine.
Hybrid operating room streamlines diagnosis, treatment of lung cancer
Representing a paradigm shift in thoracic surgery, the hybrid operating room combines three techniques into a single appointment eliminating multiple clinical visits for improved patient experience and outcomes.
Deciphering the link between skin allergies and the gut microbiota
Over the last few years, scientists have discovered connections between gut microbiota imbalances and various diseases.
Minimally invasive autopsy improves postmortem diagnoses
Minimally invasive autopsy with CT and MRI performs as well as conventional autopsy in detecting cause of death and has the advantage of yielding more diagnoses, according to a new study.
California Academy of Sciences discovers new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish
Named for Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love and beauty, a new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish from the twilight zone enchants Academy scientists.
UN prioritizes tuberculosis prevention in high-risk occupations
This release is timed to coincide with the UN's first ever High-Level meeting on TB in the General Assembly where national leaders are embracing strategies to prevent TB with silica dust controls to protect the 230 million workers exposed to silica.
UCI researchers identify new cause of brain bleeds
A team of researchers including UCI project scientist Rachita Sumbria, Ph.D., and UCI neurologist Mark J.
Who believes in conspiracies? New research offers a theory
Conspiracy theories have been cooked up throughout history, but they are increasingly visible lately.
Built-in sound amplifier helps male mosquitoes find females
The ears of male mosquitoes amplify the sound of an approaching female using a self-generated phantom tone that mimics the female's wingbeats, which increases the ear's acoustic input by a factor of up to 45,000, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature Communications.
Skin wounds in older mice are less likely to scar
Researchers have discovered a rare example in which the mammalian body functions better in old age.
Health data breaches on the rise
The ongoing transition to electronic health records may increase data breaches involving patient records.
Two studies describe improved approach to bone marrow transplant
Two recent studies in the journal Leukemia present a new approach for bone marrow donation and transplant that preclinical laboratory tests suggest could make the life-saving procedure safer and more effective for patients.
Immune cell pruning of dopamine receptors may modulate behavioral changes in adolescence
A study by MassGeneral Hospital for Children researchers finds that the immune cells of the brain called microglia play a crucial role in brain development during adolescence, but that role is different in males and females.
CT technique expands possibilities of imaging ancient remains
Researchers in Sweden using computed tomography (CT) have successfully imaged the soft tissue of an ancient Egyptian mummy's hand down to a microscopic level, according to a new study.
Infectious bacteria hibernate to evade antibiotics
University of Copenhagen researchers have discovered a surprising tactic of pathogenic bacteria when being attacked by antibiotics: hibernation.
Study finds that a lifestyle intervention may mitigate PFAS-related weight gain
A new study finds that perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are associated with increases in weight, but exercise and diet may reduce the obesogenic effects of these environmental contaminants.
Combo therapy of prostatectomy plus radiotherapy may improve survival in prostate cancer
A comparison of two of the most common combination therapies for locally advanced prostate cancer show the more aggressive option is linked with a higher rate of survival.
Indoor HEPA filters significantly reduce pollution indoors when outside air unhealthy, study finds
Outdoor air pollution is a major contributor to indoor air pollution -- but high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the home significantly reduce fine-particulate matter in the air compared with non-HEPA air filters, according to a new study.
Brigatinib becomes potential new first-line option for ALK-positive non-small lung cancer
'In 2017, alectinib, another next generation ALK-inhibitor, showed that it was superior to crizotinib in the first-line setting through the ALEX trial and now, in 2018, brigatinib is set to join alectinib as a 1st line option for ALK positive lung cancer,' said D.
Motor learning for precise motor execution
Scientists at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, RIKEN, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Nozomi Hospital and Tokyo Medical and Dental University have identified acquisition of two types of internal models for motor control, which are likely to be stored in the cerebellum.
What is long-term risk of appendicitis reoccurring in patients treated with antibiotics?
About 60 percent of patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis who were initially treated with antibiotics did not undergo appendectomy in five years in a follow-up to a randomized clinical trial.
Diversity in the brain -- how millions of neurons become unique
How is it possible that so many different and highly specific neurons arise in the brain?
Molecule capable of halting and reverting Parkinson's neurodegeneration identified
The small SynuClean-D molecule interrupts the formation of the alpha-synuclein amyloid fibres responsible for the onset of Parkinson's disease, and reverts the neurodegeneration caused by the disease.
Identical driver gene mutations found in metastatic cancers
Driver genes in different metastases from the same patient are remarkably similar, providing optimism for the success of future targeted therapies, according to a published study by Science.
Mass. General study analyzes numbers, trends in health care data breaches nationwide
Health plans -- entities that cover the costs of medical care -- accounted for the greatest number of patient records breached over the past seven years, according to an analysis of US health care data conducted by two Massachusetts General Hospital physicians.
Study reveals patterns in STEM grades of girls versus boys
A new study, led by UNSW Sydney PhD student Rose O'Dea, has explored patterns in academic grades of 1.6 million students, showing that girls and boys perform very similarly in STEM - including at the top of the class.
The crazy dance of falling knots
Can the topology of microobjects influence the way they move in a fluid?
Sun exposure gets personal with wearable UV sensors
RMIT researchers have developed a UV active ink that changes color when exposed to different types of UV rays, providing personalized exposure readings based on skin type.
How leaves talk to roots
New findings show that a micro RNA from the shoot keeps legume roots susceptible to symbiotic infection by downregulating a gene that would otherwise hinder root responses to symbiotic bacteria.
Protestantism still matters when it comes to education, study shows
A new academic study, the first of its kind, reveals a significant and positive historical legacy of Protestant religion in education around the world.
New way of determining treatment for staph infections cuts antibiotic use
Using a clinical checklist to identify eligible patients, doctors were able to shorten the antibiotic duration for patients with uncomplicated staphylococcal bloodstream infections by nearly two days, Duke Health researchers report.
Bacteria's password for sporulation hasn't changed in 2.7 billion years
When it comes to changing their passwords, bacteria are just as bad as you and me -- maybe even worse.
The gods of small things
On the outside, the cluster made of 55 copper and aluminum atoms looks like a crystal, but chemically it has the properties of an atom.
Screening using body mass index alone may miss every second preschooler with excess stomach fat
When assessing whether preschoolers are overweight, health professionals should use other measures such as waist-to-height ratio in addition to the body mass index (BMI).
New Tourette disorder genes come to light
In the largest DNA sequencing study of Tourette Disorder (TD) to date, UC San Francisco researchers and their collaborators have unearthed new data suggesting a potential role for disruptions in cell polarity in the development of this condition.
The quality of protein supplements for sportspeople
The results indicate that half the supplements analyzed contain more than 6 percent of blocked lysine, but only 9 percent had a content of more than 20 percent of blocked lysine.
Study shows value of breast cancer patients seeking second opinions
In a recent MUSC Hollings Cancer Center study on the value of a second opinion for breast cancer patients, researchers concluded that a review by a tumor board at an NCI-Designated Cancer Center changed the diagnosis for 43 percent of the patients.

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Dying Well
Is there a way to talk about death candidly, without fear ... and even with humor? How can we best prepare for it with those we love? This hour, TED speakers explore the beauty of life ... and death. Guests include lawyer Jason Rosenthal, humorist Emily Levine, banker and travel blogger Michelle Knox, mortician Caitlin Doughty, and entrepreneur Lux Narayan.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#492 Flint Water Crisis
This week we dig into the Flint water crisis: what happened, how it got so bad, what turned the tide, what's still left to do, and the mix of science, politics, and activism that are still needed to finish pulling Flint out of the crisis. We spend the hour with Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha, a physician, scientist, activist, the founder and director of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, and author of the book "What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City".