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Electrical enhancement: Engineers speed up electrons in semiconductors
Researchers from Graduate School of Bio-Applications and Systems Engineering at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have sped up the movement of electrons in organic semiconductor films by two to three orders of magnitude.
Participating in sports during childhood may have long-term benefits for bone health
Participation in organized sport during childhood and adolescence is associated with bone mass at 20 years of age, according to a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study.
The impact of microplastics on the environment unclear, study suggests
A review of more than 300 global studies has revealed a large 'mismatch' in the types of microplastics measured in the environment to those tested for effects in the laboratory.
Many infertile men have undiagnosed prediabetes
In a study of 744 infertile men, prediabetes was found in 114 (15.4 percent) of participants.
UNH researchers say winter ticks killing moose at alarming rate
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that the swell of infestations of winter ticks -- which attach themselves to moose during the fall and feed throughout the winter -- is the primary cause of an unprecedented 70 percent death rate of calves over a three-year period.
Mindfulness-based program may help reduce stress in infertile women
An eight-week mindfulness-based program was effective for reducing stress and depressive symptoms while increasing general well-being in a study of infertile women.
Does weight loss before surgery provide benefits?
For obese and overweight patients, it is common for various surgical procedures to be deferred until they have lost weight through diet and exercise.
Many seemingly healthy children show signs of metabolic problems
More than a quarter of otherwise healthy 6-year-old children may have metabolic risk factors that put them at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, according to results from an Acta Paediatrica study.
Study examines aspects of conscientious objection among nurses
One-on-one interviews with eight nurses in Ontario revealed that nurses making conscientious objections to ethically relevant policies lack concrete supports and need protection in healthcare practice settings.
Psoriasis linked with need for cardiovascular interventions in patients with hypertension
Psoriasis is linked with increased risks of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, but its effect on the course of cardiovascular disease remains unknown.
Societies can remain distinct despite migration
Countries around the world can retain distinct cultures despite migration, new research shows.
Study challenges concerns around imported farmed shrimp
Scientists at the University of Stirling have challenged concerns around the consumption of imported farmed shrimp -- with new research indicating that it is as safe as any other seafood product.
Nutrition has a greater impact on bone strength than exercise
One question that scientists and fitness experts alike would love to answer is whether exercise or nutrition has a bigger positive impact on bone strength.
Novel antidepressant may improve sleep in patients with depression
In a study of 15 patients affected by major depressive disorder and complaining of insomnia, initiating treatment with vortioxetine for their depressive symptoms led to significant improvements in subjective sleep quality and daytime sleepiness.
High-dose radiation therapy improves survival in patients once thought incurable
In the first randomized, phase II clinical trial of its kind, researchers have shown that an aggressive form of high-precision radiation therapy can greatly increase how long oligometastatic patients live and doubles how long they live without cancer.
Regulating microglial activity may reduce inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases
A group of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators is proposing that targeting immune checkpoints -- molecules that regulate the activity of the immune system -- in immune cells called microglia could reduce the inflammatory aspects of important neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS.
Prescription opioid and benzodiazepine misuse linked with suicidal thoughts
Misuse of prescription opioids or benzodiazepines (such as Xanax) was associated with suicidal ideation in a study of US older adults.
Inducing labor at 39 weeks may benefit pregnant women and their babies
As the prevalence of maternal and fetal complications increases with advancing pregnancy beyond 39 weeks, induction of labor at 39 weeks has been proposed as a means to ensure optimal maternal and newborn health.
Novel switching valve to receive more semen in a sex-role reversed cave insect
The female of a sex-role reversed cave insect species Neotrogla has evolved a switching valve to receive more semen during mating, when a penis-like structure in the female anchors in the male 'vagina.'
Study examines factors linked with opioid misuse among university students
In a survey-based study of 9,449 university students at a large, public Midwestern university, misusers of prescription opioid medications were more likely to live off campus, have a lower grade point average, and exhibit increased impulsivity.
Global experts gather in Montreal for opening of 11th World Stroke Congress
The 11th World Stroke Congress brings together leading international stroke experts and an unparalleled scientific program covering epidemiology, prevention, acute care, rehabilitation and recovery in hundreds of sessions and oral posters.
African-American men's health disparities: Research, practice, and policy implications
The burden of risk factors for chronic disease is substantially higher in black men compared with their white counterparts, including a higher prevalence of obesity and hypertension.
FEFU astrophysicist contributed into international-team efforts on study Comet 29P
Evgenij Zubko of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in collaboration with other team members has developed a comprehensive model to explain the results of a photometric study of the Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (29P) which was successfully accomplished recently.
Supermassive black holes and supercomputers
The universe's deep past is beyond the reach of even the mighty Hubble Space Telescope.
Are microplastics in the environment truly harmful?
Investigators who analyzed the published literature have found significant gaps in our understanding of the effects of microplastics -- plastic particles less than 5mm in size -- in the environment.
Penetrating the soil's surface with radar
Ground penetrating radar measures the amount of moisture in soil quickly and easily.
Childhood abuse linked to increased arthritis risk in adulthood
In a survey-based study of 21,889 adults in Canada, severe and/or frequent physical abuse during childhood and frequent childhood exposure to intimate partner violence were linked with higher risks or arthritis during adulthood arthritis, even after controlling for a range of factors.
Study documents paternal transmission of epigenetic memory via sperm
Studies of human populations and animal models suggest that a father's experiences such as diet or environmental stress can influence the health and development of his descendants.
Getting to the root of long-term tree swallow declines
Aerial insectivores -- birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing -- are declining across North America.
Blue crab baby sizes and shapes influence their survival
Like people, blue crabs aren't all the same sizes and shapes.
3D-printed lithium-ion batteries
Electric vehicles and most electronic devices, such as cell phones and laptop computers, are powered by lithium-ion batteries.
School students identify sounds caused by solar storm
School students have successfully identified sounds caused by a solar storm in the Earth's magnetic shield, as part of a Queen Mary University of London research project.
Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney
There just aren't enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure.
Zinc oxide nanoparticles: Therapeutic benefits and toxicological hazards
Despite the widespread application of zinc oxide nanoparticles in biomedicine, their use is still a controversial issue.
Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time
Moss, one of the world's oldest plants, is surprisingly in tune with the atmosphere around it.
Plant hormone makes space farming a possibility
With scarce nutrients and weak gravity, growing potatoes on the Moon or on other planets seems unimaginable.
Double dust ring test could spot migrating planets
New research by a team led by an astrophysicist at the University of Warwick has a way of finally telling whether newly forming planets are migrating within the disc of dust and gas that typically surrounds stars or whether they are simply staying put in the same orbit around the star.
New method uses just a drop of blood to monitor lung cancer treatment
Osaka University researchers have devised a simple method to measure the amount of cancer medication nivolumab that is bound to immune T-cells.
Sleeping beauty helps identify genes involved in a fatty liver-associated liver cancer
Hepatocellular carcinoma, a deadly form of liver cancer, is increasingly being linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; however, the underlying genetic mechanism of disease progression had remained unknown.
World Heritage Sites threatened by rising sea levels
In the Mediterranean region, there are numerous UNESCO World Heritage Sites in low-lying coastal areas.
Selfish people have fewer children and earn less money
What happens to those who behave unselfishly and make sacrifices for the sake of others?

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Hacking The Law
We have a vision of justice as blind, impartial, and fair — but in reality, the law often fails those who need it most. This hour, TED speakers explore radical ways to change the legal system. Guests include lawyer and social justice advocate Robin Steinberg, animal rights lawyer Steven Wise, political activist Brett Hennig, and lawyer and social entrepreneur Vivek Maru.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#495 Earth Science in Space
Some worlds are made of sand. Some are made of water. Some are even made of salt. In science fiction and fantasy, planet can be made of whatever you want. But what does that mean for how the planets themselves work? When in doubt, throw an asteroid at it. This is a live show recorded at the 2018 Dragon Con in Atlanta Georgia. Featuring Travor Valle, Mika McKinnon, David Moscato, Scott Harris, and moderated by our own Bethany Brookshire. Note: The sound isn't as good as we'd hoped but we love the guests and the conversation and we wanted to...