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Squid could provide an eco-friendly alternative to plastics
The remarkable properties of a recently-discovered squid protein could revolutionize materials in a way that would be unattainable with conventional plastic.
New robotic sensor technology can diagnose reproductive health problems in real-time
Researchers have developed new robotic sensor technology that has the capability to diagnose women's reproductive health problems in real-time.
How genes affect tobacco and alcohol use
A new study gives insight into the complexity of genetic and environmental factors that compel some of us to drink and smoke more than others.
Comparing financial burdens of head and neck cancer with other cancers
Head and neck cancer is expensive to treat and the disease can create long-term health needs.
Innovative nanocoating technology harnesses sunlight to degrade microplastics
Low density polyethylene film (LDPE) microplastic fragments, successfully degraded in water using visible-light-excited heterogeneous ZnO photocatalysts.
Handwriting: The foodie font of love
For restaurants, conveying a sense of love could be as simple as picking a different menu font.
Two types of HPV linked to cervical cancer have declined since the advent of the HPV vaccine
An analysis of cervical precancers over a period of seven years showed that two strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) that have been targeted by vaccination since 2006 have declined, accounting for a smaller proportion of cervical disease.
Being overweight in adolescence may increase kidney cancer risk later in life
Being overweight has been linked with a higher risk of developing a form of kidney cancer called renal cell carcinoma (RCC) among adults, but it's unclear if this risk is present during adolescence.
Could whole grains, dietary fiber be associated with lower risk of liver cancer?
This study used data for participants followed-up for 24 years as part of two well-known study groups to examine the association between whole grain and dietary fiber intake with the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, a predominant form of liver cancer.
Using E. coli to create bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner
LSU mechanical engineering graduate student Tatiana Mello of Piracicaba, Brazil, is currently working on genetically engineering and optimizing E. coli bacteria to produce bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner.
Free patient case management tool accurately measures physicians' diagnostic abilities
Assessing the accuracy and value of an increasingly popular and free online patient management app, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and other institutions say that physicians with more training and experience perform better in selecting appropriate diagnoses for sample patient scenarios.
Consuming garlic and onions may lower colorectal cancer risk
Consumption of allium vegetables -- which include garlic, leeks, and onions -- was linked with a reduced risk of in colorectal cancer in a study of men and women in China.
New strategy improves efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing
The efficiency of CRISPR genome editing tools targeted to the site of interest by Cas9 nucleases varies considerably and a new CMP-fusion strategy, called CRISPR-chrom, enhances the activity up to several-fold.
Automated speed enforcement doesn't just reduce collisions -- it helps reduce crime
It's widely accepted that automated photo enforcement programs targeting speeding help reduce collisions and promote safe driving.
Study finds increase in calls to US Poison Control Centers for kratom exposure
A new study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital found that there were more than 1,800 calls to US Poison Control Centers regarding exposures to kratom from January 2011 through December 2017.
10 percent of Chinese adults have high heart disease risk, aren't treated for it
Researchers at Yale and at the National Center for Cardiovascular Disease in China just quantified a significant opportunity to improve Chinese heart health: 1 in 10 middle-aged Chinese adults are at high risk for heart disease, yet only about 3 percent of those at-risk are taking either statins or aspirin, the recommended therapies for managing that risk.
Researchers get to the bottom of fairy circles
Fairy circles are round gaps in arid grassland that are distributed very uniformly over the landscape and only occur along the Namib Desert in southern Africa and in parts of Australia.
Current tools have low accuracy for predicting delayed ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage
Both CT angiography and transcranial Doppler have limited accuracy in detecting cerebral vasospasm and predicting delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to ruptured aneurysm, reports a study in the inaugural edition of Critical Care Explorations, the official open-access journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM).
Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you
It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill some people yet save others.
Surprising findings on forest fires
Several years ago, an international team of scientists led by the University of Bonn raised sediments from the bottom of Lake Van in eastern Turkey reflecting the past 600,000 years.
Signals on the scales
How are the images cast on the retina reassembled in the brain?
Mayo Clinic researchers review modern cases of leprosy
Leprosy has a history that has spanned centuries and societies across the globe.
More flexible nanomaterials can make fuel cell cars cheaper
A new method of increasing the reactivity of ultrathin nanosheets, just a few atoms thick, can someday make fuel cells for hydrogen cars cheaper, finds a new Johns Hopkins study.
Breast cancer study confirms importance of multigenerational family data to assess risk
Researchers evaluated four commonly used breast cancer prediction models and found that family-history-based models perform better than non-family-history based models, even for women at average or below-average risk of breast cancer.
How to treat depression in prison -- and why it matters
Of the 4 million prisoners released each year, 23 percent have suffered from major depressive disorder.
Too hot for comfort: the physiological dangers of extreme heat
A new review of more than 140 studies explores the physiological dangers that climate change will likely have on animal life, including humans.
Study examines individuals' willingness to use artificial intelligence in career choices
Artificial intelligence is revolutionizing the way we do business, and it can potentially allow firms to improve their decision making, given that individuals are willing to adopt algorithms in decision-making contexts.
A missing gene makes a big difference in patients' recovery from mild stroke
UCLA neuroscientists found that patients born without a gene called CCR5 recover better from mild stroke.
Aquatic microorganism could inspire soft robots able to move fast in narrow spaces
Euglena cells are unicellular organisms that spend most of their time on swimming by beating their flagellum.
Fruit fly wing research reshapes understanding of how organs form
How do fruit flies grow their wings? Rutgers scientists discovered a surprising answer that could one day help diagnose and treat human genetic diseases.
New drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy clears phase 1 clinical trial testing in boys
Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have few treatment options.
Recent drought may provide a glimpse of the future for birds in the Sierra Nevada
To better understand the effects of climate change on the bird community in the Sierra Nevada region, researchers examined the impacts to birds from a recent extreme drought (2013-2016).
Quantum dots can spit out clone-like photons
MIT and ETH Zurich researchers have produced coherent single photon emitters, a key component for future quantum computers and communications systems.
Binary neutron star merger produced a compact jet of material detectible From Earth
Using a global network of radio telescopes, researchers have found that the binary neutron star merger event GW170817 produced a jet of material expanding at close to the speed of light, a new study reports.
Study links diabetes and back pain
People with diabetes have a 35 percent higher risk of experiencing low back pain and 24 percent higher risk of having neck pain than those without diabetes, a review by University of Sydney researchers has found.
How to freeze heat conduction
The thermoelectric effect can turn waste heat into electrical energy.
New paper provides design principles for disease-sensing nanomaterials
A newly published paper from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York, Brooklyn College, and Hunter College, outlines novel design guidance that could rapidly advance development of disease-sensing nanomaterials for use in new drug development.
Climate change may affect ecological interactions among species
Predator-prey equilibria are being disrupted by climate change, according to a study led by Brazilian researchers and published in Nature Climate Change.
Scientists discover new type of immune cells that are essential for forming heart valves
UCLA researchers have identified for the first time the origin of an immune cell that plays a critical role in the formation of healthy heart valves.
NASA takes an infrared analysis of Tropical Cyclone Oma
An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite revealed where the strongest storms were located within the Southern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Oma.
Chemical added to consumer products impairs response to antibiotic treatment
Triclosan exposure may inadvertently drive bacteria into a state in which they are able to tolerate normally lethal concentrations of antibiotics -- including those antibiotics that are commonly used to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs).
Hachimoji -- Expanding the genetic alphabet from four to eight
A new form of synthetic DNA expands the information density of the genetic code, that likely preserves its capability for supporting life, according to a new study.
Women with more social support are less likely to die, new study finds
In the largest study to explore the impact of perceived social support on cardiovascular disease and mortality, George Mason University College of Health and Human Services finds postmenopausal women aged 50-79 with higher perceived social support were modestly less likely to die during the course of the study; no significant link found between increased social support and CVD.
Achieving greater efficiency for fast data center operations
Algorithm and software system Shenango improves data center efficiency for microsecond-speed operations by better allocating data processing across CPU cores to reduce tail latency and ensure hardware runs productively.
Study: Teacher retention bonuses lead to positive results
Offering teachers a retention bonus to stay at low-performing schools may increase test score gains among students in both reading and mathematics, according to a new study.
Method assesses health and size of lizard populations
Monitoring programs that survey many wildlife species at the same time across large geographic regions are important for informing conservation decisions, but reptiles are often missing from these efforts because they are difficult to survey.
New 'interspecies communication' strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered
Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts, they can also tell the genes in their mammalian hosts what to do.
Salk scientists uncover how high-fat diet drives colorectal cancer growth
A new study led by Salk Institute scientists suggests that high-fat diets fuel colorectal cancer growth by upsetting the balance of bile acids in the intestine and triggering a hormonal signal that lets potentially cancerous cells thrive.
Hesperos' multi-organ 'human-on-a-chip' found effective for long-term toxicology testing
Hesperos reports the successful testing of multi-organ 'human-on-a-chip' models to recapitulate the 28-day experiments typically used in animals to evaluate the systemic toxicity of drug and cosmetic compounds.
Study links unhealthy diet to mental illness in California adults
The study, published Feb. 16, 2019 in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, revealed that California adults who consumed more unhealthy food were also more likely to report symptoms of either moderate or severe psychological distress than their peers who consume a healthier diet.
Planting small seeds simply: The allure of the slide hammer seeder
The development of a simply made and easy-to-use planting device could make growing important herbs and beneficial insect-attracting plants significantly more efficient and effective.
Physicists get thousands of semiconductor nuclei to do 'quantum dances' in unison
The Cambridge team found a way to exploit the interaction between the electron and the thousands of nuclei using lasers to 'cool' the nuclei to less than 1 milliKelvin.
Expanding the use of silicon in batteries, by preventing electrodes from expanding
Silicon anodes are generally viewed as the next development in lithium-ion battery technology.
How plants learned to save water
Plants that can manage with less water could make agriculture more sustainable.
Do volcanoes or an asteroid deserve blame for dinosaur extinction?
UC Berkeley scientists have obtained more precise dates for the Deccan Traps volcanic lava flows, linking peak activity more closely to the asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago and the coincident mass extinction.
Yeasts reach across tree of life to domesticate suite of bacterial genes
New research finds that some yeast picked up a whole suite of genes from bacteria that gave them the new ability to scavenge iron from their environment.
How news coverage of terrorism may shape support for anti-Muslim policies
Terrorist attacks committed by the so-called Islamic State are rising in Western countries.
Radio-tracking dolphins reveals intimate details about their behavior
The most extensive radio-tracking effort of bottlenose dolphins in the Indian River Lagoon using radio-telemetry reveals new and surprising information about how they use their habitats, how they spend their time, and how they interact with their own species.
Russian scientists show changes in the erythrocyte nanostructure under stress
Various stress effects make an integral part of modern life, and their minimization is of particular relevance.
New mechanisms regulating neural stem cells
The use of stem cells to repair organs is one of the foremost goals of modern regenerative medicine.
Good news: Habitats worthy of protection in Germany are protected
The world's largest coordinated network of protected areas is not located at the South Pole or in Australia, Africa, Asia or on the American continents -- but in Europe.
Believing in yourself can backfire when investing in equity crowdfunded ventures
Normally, it's good to believe in yourself. But research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business indicates that it can be bad advice for amateurs investing online in unregulated, sometimes risky, equity crowdfunded ventures.
Figuring out the fovea
Using high-throughput genetic sequencing methods, scientists have created the first cellular atlas of the primate retina, an important foundation for researchers to build on as they seek to understand how vision works in primates, including humans, and how vision can be disrupted by disease.
Two studies explore timing, influence of deccan trap volcanism in dinosaurs' demise
In two separate studies, researchers using different methods of high-precision dating attempted to illuminate the series of events that led to the demise of vast swaths of life on Earth nearly 66 million years ago.
Prenatal exposure to plastics linked to motor skill deficiencies at age 11
Scientists with the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report motor skills problems in children exposed during pregnancy to plasticizer chemicals known as phthalates that are widely used in personal care products like moisturizers and lipstick, as well as plastic containers and children's toys.
Cellular sickness linked to type 1 diabetes onset
A UC San Francisco study of human and mouse pancreatic tissue suggests a new origin story for type 1 (T1) diabetes.
Hubble helps uncover origin of Neptune's smallest moon Hippocamp
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, along with older data from the Voyager 2 probe, have revealed more about the origin of Neptune's smallest moon.
Unnecessary testing for UTIs cut by nearly half
Over-testing for urinary tract infections (UTIs) leads to unnecessary antibiotic use, which spreads antibiotic resistance.
Foxes were domesticated by humans in the Bronze Age
In the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, between the third and second millennium BC, a widespread funeral practice consisted in burying humans with animals.
How to keep the stink bugs out this winter 
Two new studies published in the Journal of Economic Entomology may shed some light on ways to keep the pests away
Righty or lefty, as you like
New iridium catalyst enables selective synthesis of valuable drug ingredients in a more efficient way.
Addressing a lack of regulatory standards in clinical artificial intelligence
As the use of artificial intelligence and predictive analytics in medicine becomes more commonplace in hospitals worldwide, the regulations around these approaches must keep pace -- to ensure that the technology will improve the quality and efficiency of patient care.
JILA researchers make coldest quantum gas of molecules
JILA researchers have made a long-lived, record-cold gas of molecules that follow the wave patterns of quantum mechanics instead of the strictly particle nature of ordinary classical physics.
NASA infrared image shows powerful center of Typhoon Wutip
NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Wutip as it threatens Chuuk and Yap States in the Southern Pacific Ocean.
Social connectedness may help victims of cyberbullying
A new Psychology in the Schools study found that social connectedness may act as a protective buffer against the negative mental health effects of cyberbullying.
New in the Hastings Center Report, January-February 2019
Social media as a bioethics issue: several articles examine concerns raised by integrating social media platforms and artificial intelligence into medical practice, research, and public health.
Media alert: New articles in the CRISPR Journal
The CRISPR Journal announces the publication of its February 2019 issue.
ICHE Roundup: Unnecessary urine tests, surgical infections, nurses' role in stewardship
Brief summaries of embargoed studies that to publish in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, including preventing unnecessary urine tests and treatment, surgical site infections come from patients' microbiome, and nurses role in antibiotic stewardship.
The dollar store diet: Study shows discount produce matches quality of traditional chains
When you hear about dollar-discount stores, the first thought that comes to mind likely isn't groceries for you and your family.
Cracking feather formation could lead to cooler birds
Scientists have revealed how bird feathers form in a wave-like motion, creating a regular pattern in the skin.
Research shows for the first time how we use others' viewpoints to make decisions
Everyday life is full of situations that require us to take others' perspectives.
Smartphones help UB researcher better understand the nature of depression and anxiety
A University at Buffalo psychologist's research using smartphones is providing valuable data in real time, information that could provide treatment benefits for patients struggling with anxiety and depression.
American drug overdose death rates the highest among wealthy nations, USC study finds
A USC study found that the United States has the highest drug overdose death rates among a set of high-income countries.
Nearly two-thirds of American children live in asset poverty, new study shows
More than 63 percent of American children and 55 percent of Americans live in 'asset' poverty, meaning they have few or no assets to rely on in the event of a financial shock such as a job loss, a medical crisis or the recent federal government shutdown.
Half-a-billion-year-old weird wonder worm finally gets its place in the tree of life
Paleobiologists from the University of Bristol have shed new light on a jaw-snapping species of prehistoric worm using half-a-billion-year-old fossils kept at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.
WVU researcher explores what tumor cells and a healthy retina have in common
West Virginia University researcher Jianhai Du is parsing how the retina hijacks an energy-producing chemical reaction to churn out molecular building blocks to renew photoreceptor membranes that keep our vision sharp.
Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments
Researchers swabbed more than 2300 animals representing 205 amphibian species to better understand the ecology of their skin bacteria.
'Goldilocks' thinking to cut cost of fuel cells in electric vehicles
Electric vehicles running on fuel cells tout zero emissions and higher efficiency, but expensive platinum is holding them back from entering a larger market.
Could saffron be as effective as stimulant medicines in treating ADHD?
A new short-term pilot study in children and teens 6-17 years old with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has shown saffron to be as effective at controlling symptoms as methylphenidate, the commonly prescribed drug Ritalin.
In small groups, people follow high-performing leaders
Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have cracked the code on how leaders arise from small groups of people over time.
Tiny Neptune moon spotted by Hubble may have broken from larger moon
After several years of analysis, a team of planetary scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has at last come up with an explanation for a mysterious moon around Neptune that they discovered with Hubble in 2013.
New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex
A newly discovered, diminutive -- by T. rex standards -- relative of the tyrant king of dinosaurs reveals crucial new information about when and how T. rex came to rule the North American roost.
Can smoking cessation reduce rheumatoid arthritis risk?
In an Arthritis Care & Research analysis of 230,732 women, those who quit smoking many years ago had a lower risk of a certain form of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with women who recently quit.
Is the drug overdose epidemic unique to the United States?
Is the current American drug overdose epidemic an isolated phenomenon?
MTHFD2 mitochondrial metabolic enzyme maintains cancer stem-like cells
Tumor tissues include cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) that are responsible for recurrence and drug resistance.
Pioneering study could offer protection to patients with rare genetic disease
Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a healthy population, according to new research from the University of Bath.
UBC researchers explore an often ignored source of greenhouse gas
In a new study from UBC's Okanagan campus, researchers have discovered a surprising new source of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions -- bicarbonates hidden in the lake water used to irrigate local orchards.
Preventing the production of toxic mitochondrial proteins -- a promising treatment target
Researchers at the University of Helsinki uncovered the mechanisms for a novel cellular stress response arising from the toxicity of newly synthesized proteins.
New weapon to combat counterfeit goods: use your smartphone to check for fake merchandise
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have invented a chemical fingerprint that, when used with a phone app, reveals whether a product is genuine or a fake.
Researchers discover a genetic defect linked to pediatric liver disease
Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, in collaboration with several other institutions, have discovered a genetic defect linked to biliary atresia (BA), the most common pediatric cause of end-stage liver disease, and the leading indication for liver transplantation in children.
Height gap with parents, not genetics, determines onset of puberty -- Ben-Gurion U. study
'A child who hits puberty earlier than his peers, but at a time consistent with a parental height gap model, should be considered 'healthy',' Dr.
Not enough evidence linking noncaloric sweeteners with adverse effects on gut microbiota
There is not enough evidence related to the effects of noncaloric sweeteners on appetite, short-term intake, and risk of suffering from cancer or diabetes, according to the conclusions of this review.
Can mixing household cleaners kill you? (video)
When the bathroom starts looking grimy, and it's time to whip out yellow gloves, the only thing that matters is getting the job done quickly.
Smoking cessation may reduce risk of rheumatoid arthritis
Analysis of data from the Nurses' Health Studies demonstrates for first time that behavior change can delay or even prevent the most severe form of rheumatoid arthritis.
How obesity affects vitamin D metabolism
A new Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study confirms that vitamin D supplementation is less effective in the presence of obesity, and it uncovers a biological mechanism to explain this observation.
Complex medication regimens are common & sometimes dangerous in patients with lung disease
Patients with interstitial lung disease -- a group of disorders causing progressive scarring of lung tissue -- are often prescribed various medications that specifically target their disease and others that treat their symptoms.
Report offers evidence-based recommendations aimed at reducing Illinois gun violence
Ilinois could reduce the number of people killed each year by gun violence by implementing ten policies supported by available research, according to a new report authored by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research.
Health burden of glaucoma has risen worldwide
The health burden of glaucoma has continuously increased around the globe in the past 25 years, according to an Acta Opthalmologica study.
Phantom limb sensation explained
After a limb amputation, brain areas responsible for movement and sensation alter their functional communication.
Certain factors linked with higher risk of infection after orthopaedic surgery
In an International Wound Journal study of 4,818 older patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgeries, five risk factors were linked with an increased risk of developing surgical site infections, including diabetes, morbid obesity, tobacco smoking, prolonged surgical duration, and lower serum albumin levels prior to surgery.
How to keep stink bugs out this winter
Every winter stink bugs infiltrate homes across the United States and two new studies published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by Virginia Tech researchers may shed some light on ways to keep the pests away.
Rules of inheritance rewritten in worms
Laboratory model breaks laws of heredity, opening up new research possibilities in genetics and synthetic biology.
PET scans show biomarkers could spare some breast cancer patients from chemotherapy
In an effort to further individualize therapy and avoid over-treating patients, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report a new study using PET scans has identified a biomarker that may accurately predict which patients with one type of HER2-positive breast cancer might best benefit from standalone HER2-targeted agents, without the need for standard chemotherapy.
New biochemical pathway that may develop more resilient crop varieties
Researchers from the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, have discovered a new biochemical pathway in plants which they have named CHLORAD.
Study examines indoor exposure to air pollution
In an Indoor Air study conducted in a suburb of the city of Kuopio, Finland, relatively short-lasting wood and candle burning of a few hours increased residents' daily exposure to potentially hazardous particulate air pollution.
Price transparency helps Arizona health system achieve financial turnaround
Efforts to understand costs and openly share information on healthcare prices played a key role in a major Arizona health system's successful turnaround from a financial crisis, according to a feature article in the Spring issue of Frontiers of Health Services Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE).
Tornado fatalities continue to fall, despite population growth in Tornado Alley
The rate of tornado-related fatalities increased faster than the rate of population growth until the start of the 20th century.
Astronomers from UCI, other institutions use new technique to find extrasolar planets
Scientists from the University of California, Irvine and other institutions have begun using the Habitable Planet Finder, a spectrograph coupled with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory in Texas, to hunt for exoplanets at M-dwarf stars.
With nanopore sensing, VCU physics researchers detect subtle changes in single particles
Researchers in Virginia Commonwealth University's Department of Physics have discovered that a technique known as nanopore sensing can be used to detect subtle changes in clusters, or extremely small chunks of matter that are bigger than a molecule but smaller than a solid.
Troubling extent of trauma and PTSD in British young people revealed
New research from King's College London suggests one in 13 young people in the UK have had post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) before reaching age 18.
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Experts warn of a surge in vector-borne diseases as humanitarian crisis in Venezuela worsens
The ongoing humanitarian crisis in Venezuela is accelerating the re-emergence of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, Chagas disease, dengue, and Zika virus, and threatens to jeopardize public health gains in the country over the past two decades, warn leading public health experts.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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Bias And Perception
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#513 Dinosaur Tails
This week: dinosaurs! We're discussing dinosaur tails, bipedalism, paleontology public outreach, dinosaur MOOCs, and other neat dinosaur related things with Dr. Scott Persons from the University of Alberta, who is also the author of the book "Dinosaurs of the Alberta Badlands".