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Less burnout seen among US physicians, Stanford researcher says
The epidemic levels of physicians reporting burnout dropped modestly in 2017, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic and the American Medical Association.
New MRI sensor can image activity deep within the brain
MIT researchers have developed an MRI-based calcium sensor that allows them to peer deep into the brain.
Revealing the role of the mysterious small proteins
CRG investigators develop a technique to identify and classify proteins with less than 100 amino acids.
Pharmaceutical residues in fresh water pose a growing environmental risk
Over the past 20 years, concentrations of pharmaceuticals have increased in freshwater sources all over the world, as research by environmental experts at Radboud University has revealed.
How diabetes causes muscle loss
Diabetes is associated with various health problems including decline in skeletal muscle mass.
Finding keyholes in metals 3D printing
New research published today in Science, led by researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and Argonne National Laboratory, has identified how and when these gas pockets form, as well as a methodology to predict their formation -- a pivotal discovery that could dramatically improve the 3D printing process.
More water resources over the Sahel region of Africa in the 21st century under global warming
Scientists from Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences found that the projection uncertainty of Sahel summer precipitation among the climate models is closely related to the historical precipitation simulation in South Asia and the western North Pacific.
A peek at living room decor suggests how decorations vary around the world
People around the world paint their walls different colors, buy plants to spruce up their interiors and engage in a variety of other beautifying techniques to personalize their homes, which inspired a team of researchers to study about 50,000 living rooms across the globe.
Treatment to a T? Taking a 'BiTE' out of lung cancer
An Osaka University-led research team assayed T cell cytotoxicity in tumor tissue in lung cancer, along with normal lung tissue and peripheral blood.
Could blockchain ensure integrity of clinical trial data?
UC San Francisco researchers have created a proof-of-concept method for ensuring the integrity of clinical trials data with blockchain.
Split and continuous sleep in teens impact cognition and glucose levels differently
Under conditions of insufficient sleep, effects on cognitive performance and morning glucose levels vary depending on how sleep is distributed, says study's principal investigator Professor Michael Chee.
Exploring the global landscape of quantum technology research
Leading quantum technology experts from around the world have explored their respective regional and national goals for the future of the field, in a new focus issue of Quantum Science and Technology.
Correct antibiotic dosing could preserve lung microbial diversity in cystic fibrosis
Children and young adults with cystic fibrosis whose lung infections were treated with suboptimal doses of antibiotics had fewer changes in lung microbial diversity during the IV treatment, and their microbial diversity levels were higher 30 days later, a multi-institutional study that includes Children's researchers shows.
Potential of strategic partnerships to form a Health Equity Network of the Americas (HENA)
Recognizing the persistence of health inequities in the Americas, an emerging Health Equity Network of the Americas (HENA) describes its approach to promoting health equity through intersectoral partnerships in a newly released issue of Ethnicity & Disease.
A tasty Florida butterfly turns sour
A 15-year study led by University of Arizona entomologist Katy Prudic found that, when living apart from the unsavory bug it mimics, the viceroy butterfly becomes yucky, making biologists rethink old theories about animal mimicry.
Magnetization reversal achieved at room temperature using only an electric field
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology achieved magnetization reversal in cobalt-substituted bismuth ferrite by applying only an electric field.
Proximity to land determines how coral reef communities respond to climate change events
Severe weather and environmental disturbances, such as cyclones or thermal coral bleaching, affect specific areas of coral reefs differently, new research has shown.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Bias And Perception
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Now Playing: Science for the People

#514 Arctic Energy (Rebroadcast)
This week we're looking at how alternative energy works in the arctic. We speak to Louie Azzolini and Linda Todd from the Arctic Energy Alliance, a non-profit helping communities reduce their energy usage and transition to more affordable and sustainable forms of energy. And the lessons they're learning along the way can help those of us further south.