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Simple test predicts dangerous pregnancy disorder
Researchers have developed a simple, low-cost way to predict preeclampsia, a potentially deadly condition that kills 76,000 mothers and 500,000 babies every year.
Fragmented magnetism
Spin-polarizing scanning tunneling microscopy allowed researchers to detect an elusive atomic-scale magnetic signal in a Mott insulator, reports a team of scientists from Boston College, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and University of California, Santa Barbara.
New flame retardants, old problems
New flame retardants escaping from our TVs, other electrical and electronic products, and children's car seats are just as toxic as the flame retardants they're intended to replace, according to a peer-reviewed study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.
Aggressive form of breast cancer influenced by dual action of genes and RNA
Women with an aggressive, less-common type of breast cancer, known as triple-negative, versus a more common form of the disease, could be differentiated from each other by a panel of 17 small RNA molecules that are directly influenced by genetic alterations typically found in cancer cells.
New treatment may reverse celiac disease
A phase 2 clinical trial using a new technology show it is possible to induce immune tolerance to gluten in individuals with celiac disease.
Farmer wages must be improved to prevent millions in India from malnutrition
A comprehensive study led by Colonel Divakaran Padma Kumar Pillay -- a former Indian Army officer, severely wounded in counter insurgency operations - calls for an overhaul of food security systems in India, with improved farmer wages, a greater use of technology, and improved management, to help better feed the millions of Indian people suffering with malnutrition.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.