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Today's Science News and Current Events


What factors affect quality of life in older patients with cancer?
A new study provides insights on the factors that affect health-related quality of life in older adults with cancer.
Primitive fossil bear with a sweet tooth identified from Canada's High Arctic
Researchers from the Canadian Museum of Nature and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County have identified remains of a 3.5-million-year-old bear from a fossil-rich site in Canada's High Arctic.
New vaccine technology shows promise as a tool to combat the opioid crisis
An experimental heroin vaccine induced antibodies that prevented the drug from crossing the blood-brain barrier in mice and rats.
Early diagnosis can save babies' lives: A guide to severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID)
The review, published in CMAJ, is aimed at pediatricians, family physicians and other doctors who may treat newborns, including those who appear healthy at birth but begin to get severe, repeated infections requiring emergency department visits.
How fungi helped create life as we know it
Today our world is visually dominated by animals and plants, but this world would not have been possible without fungi, say University of Leeds scientists.
New study shows how birds work to sing together
A new paper published in Behavioral Ecology finds that songbirds may coordinate both vocally and visually to enhance their singing partners' responses.
Tracking effects of a food preservative on the gut microbiome
Antimicrobial compounds added to preserve food during storage are believed to be benign and non-toxic to the consumer, but there is 'a critical scientific gap in understanding the potential interactions' they may have with the hundreds of species of microbes in our intestines, say David Sela, a nutritional microbiologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and colleagues.
Using viruses to fight viruses: New approach eliminates 'dormant' HIV-infected cells
Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have discovered that the Maraba virus, or MG1, can target and destroy the kind of HIV-infected cells that standard antiretroviral therapies can't reach.
Are parents doing enough to prepare 'substitute' babysitters over the holidays?
Parents may underestimate the importance of preparing new sitters for common scenarios like injuries or more serious emergencies.
New RCT shows no benefit from probiotics, xylitol chewing gum in alleviating sore throats
The use of probiotics and xylitol chewing gum to alleviate sore throat symptoms -- as an alternative to antibiotics -- appears to have no effect, according to a randomized controlled trial (RCT) published in CMAJ.
How much people earn is associated with how they experience happiness
People who earn more money tend to experience more positive emotions focused on themselves, while people who earn less take greater pleasure in their relationships and ability to connect with others, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
'Simple, but powerful' model reveals mechanisms behind neuron development
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have now uncovered new insights into the regulatory network behind neuron growth.
Dartmouth engineers produce breakthrough sensor for photography, life sciences, security
Engineers from Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering have produced a new imaging technology that may revolutionize medical and life sciences research, security, photography, cinematography and other applications that rely on high-quality, low-light imaging.
Researchers find racial disparities in intensity of care at the end of life
Different outcomes exist between blacks and whites receiving care from the same hospice.
How do you spot a Russian bot? Answer goes beyond Kremlin watching, new research finds
A team of researchers has isolated the characteristics of bots on Twitter through an examination of bot activity related to Russian political discussions.
Abuse and adversity in childhood linked to more cardiovascular risk in adulthood
Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults.
Theorists propose conditions needed to search for new form of matter
A pair of physicists provides a theoretical roadmap that could point to the discovery of an exotic magnetically ordered state of matter dubbed a 'chiral spin liquid.'
How electroconvulsive therapy relieves depression per animal experiments
In a study using genetically engineered mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have uncovered some new molecular details that appear to explain how electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) rapidly relieves severe depression in mammals, presumably including people.
Fish to benefit if large dams adopt new operating approach
Recognizing that many large dams are here to stay, a University of Washington team is investigating an emerging solution to help achieve freshwater conservation goals by re-envisioning the ways in which water is released by dams.

Best Science Podcasts 2017

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2017. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Going Undercover
Are deception and secrecy categorically wrong? Or can they be a necessary means to an end? This hour, TED speakers share stories of going undercover to explore unknown territory, and find the truth. Guests include poet and activist Theo E.J. Wilson, journalist Jamie Bartlett, counter-terrorism expert Mubin Shaikh, and educator Shabana Basij-Rasikh.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#452 Face Recognition and Identity
This week we deep dive into the science of how we recognize faces and why some of us are better -- or worse -- at this than others. We talk with Brad Duchaine, Professor of Psychology at Dartmouth College, about both super recognizers and face blindness. And we speak with Matteo Martini, Psychology Lecturer at the University of East London, about a study looking at twins who have difficulty telling which one of them a photo was of. Charity Links: Union of Concerned Scientists Evidence For Democracy Sense About Science American Association for the Advancement of Science Association for Women...