Current Medical Imaging News and Events

Current Medical Imaging News and Events, Medical Imaging News Articles.
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First observation of the early link between proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease
Study conducted by researchers from the GIGA CRC In vivo Imaging laboratory at ULiège demonstrates, for the first time in humans, how the first deposits of tau proteins in the brainstem are associated with neurophysiological processes specific to the early stages of Alzheimer's disease development. (2021-01-25)

Whole body imaging detects myeloma in more patients, treatment initiated earlier
Researchers from King's College London have shown that whole body magnetic resonance imaging (WBMRI) not only detects more myeloma-defining disease than positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) but that it also allows critical treatment to be initiated earlier. (2021-01-21)

Pioneering new technique could revolutionise super-resolution imaging systems
Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could revolutionise the accuracy, precision and clarity of super-resolution imaging systems. (2021-01-21)

Expanded PET imaging time window adds flexibility for neuroendocrine tumor patients
The imaging time window of 64Cu-DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms can be expanded from one hour to three hours post-injection, according to new research published in the January issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. In a head-to-head comparison of scans performed at the two time intervals, there were no significant differences in the number of lesions detected, and tumor-to-normal tissue ratios remained high in all key organs. (2021-01-20)

Drug-delivery microcapsules tagged with zirconium-89 can be tracked by PET imaging
Polymer and radionuclide chemists report major advance in microcapsule drug delivery systems. Their microcapsules -- labeled with radioactive zirconium-89 -- are the first example of hollow polymer capsules capable of long-term, multiday positron emission tomography imaging in vivo. In previous work, the researchers showed that the hollow capsules could be filled with a potent dose of the cancer drug doxorubicin, which could then be released by therapeutic ultrasound that ruptures the microcapsules. (2021-01-20)

New suspicious lesions on breast MRI in neoadjuvant therapy
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), new suspicious findings occurred in 5.5% of breast MRI examinations performed to monitor response to neoadjuvant therapy; none of these new lesions were malignant. (2021-01-14)

Giant 2D atlas of the universe helps dark energy spectroscopic survey
Researchers from the National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) and their collaborators released a giant 2D map of the universe, which paves the way for the upcoming new-generation dark energy spectroscopic survey. (2021-01-14)

Noted experts challenge conventional wisdom within the field of radiology
A special issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR), published by Elsevier, challenges conventional wisdom across the imaging community. This collection of articles, the ''Provocative Issue,'' presents extreme opinions on pressing issues confronting radiologists with the deliberate aim of sparking positive dialog and debate that will lead to innovative solutions to improve patient care and imaging-related outcomes. (2021-01-12)

New study examines medical practice patterns over time
Variations in medical practice can have serious consequences for the quality, equity and cost of one's health care; however, it's unclear whether these disparities can be attributed to individual differences, from one doctor to another or to changes in your doctor's individual practice over time, perhaps in response to shifts in clinical guidelines or advancements in diagnostic technologists. (2021-01-12)

Potential jurors favor use of artificial intelligence in precision medicine
Physicians who follow artificial intelligence (AI) advice may be considered less liable for medical malpractice than is commonly thought, according to a new study of potential jury candidates in the U.S. Published in the January issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM). The study provides the first data related to physicians' potential liability for using AI in personalized medicine, which can often deviate from standard care. (2021-01-11)

Engineers find antioxidants improve nanoscale visualization of polymers
Reactive molecules, such as free radicals, can be produced in the body after exposure to certain environments or substances and go on to cause cell damage. Antioxidants can minimize this damage by interacting with the radicals before they affect cells. (2021-01-08)

Viewing upper gastrointestinal cancers in a new light
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report the use of Linked Color Imaging, an innovative modality that specifically combines selected wavelengths of light for illumination in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. This method, by enhancing the subtle variations in red and white hues that indicate mucosal transformation, greatly improves the early detection of upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasms as compared with conventional white light illumination. (2021-01-05)

New imaging method reveals if antibiotics reach bacteria hiding in tissues
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and the University of Western Australia have developed a new imaging method to see where antibiotics have reached bacteria within tissues. The method could be used to help develop more effective antibiotic treatments, reducing the risk of antibiotic resistance. (2021-01-05)

Evolving the surgical microscope
Ma and Fei explain how surgical microscopes are modified into slightly different optical configurations and equipped with specific imaging modalities and platforms for different surgical applications. (2021-01-05)

Imaging of ballistic wounds, bullet composition and implications for MRI safety
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), because patients with ballistic embedded fragments are frequently denied MRI (due to indeterminate bullet composition sans shell casings), radiography and CT can be used to identify nonferromagnetic projectiles that are safe for MRI. (2020-12-29)

Bio-inspired endoscope provides 3D visible and near-infrared images simultaneously
Researchers have developed a new bio-inspired medical endoscope that can acquire 3D visible light and near-infrared fluorescence images at the same time. It features an optical design that combines the high-resolution 3D imaging of human vision with the mantis shrimp's capability to simultaneously detect multiple wavelengths of light. (2020-12-22)

Researchers deconstruct ancient Jewish parchment using multiple imaging techniques
Scientists in Romania used multiple, complementary imaging techniques to non-invasively study the composition of an aged Jewish parchment scroll. The various analyses can determine the types of materials used in the manuscript's manufacturing, providing historical context for objects of mysterious provenance. The research also offers insights into the item's degradation over time, including indications of previous repair attempts. All of this information helps conservators determine how best to restore such antiques to their original condition. (2020-12-18)

New theranostic approach reduces tumor volume and increases survival in NET study
A pair of copper radionuclides that target the somatostatin receptor overexpressed in neuroendocrine tumors has proven successful in identifying tumors and improving survival. According to new research published in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, the imaging agent 64Cu-CuSarTate produced high-quality positron emission tomography (PET) images in a mouse model of neuroendocrine tumors, while its therapeutic counterpart, 67Cu-CuSarTate, was highly effective in reducing tumor volume and extending lifespan. (2020-12-16)

Test your heart health by climbing stairs
Climbing four flights of stairs in less than a minute indicates good heart health, according to research presented at EACVI - Best of Imaging 2020, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'The stairs test is an easy way to check your heart health,' said study author Dr. Jesús Peteiro, a cardiologist at University Hospital A Coruña, Spain. (2020-12-11)

PET imaging tracer proves effective for diagnosing and managing rare CNS B-cell lymphoma
Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 68Ga-pentixafor is an effective diagnostic tool for central nervous system (CNS) B-cell lymphoma, according to a proof-of-concept study published in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-12-10)

The Journal of Nuclear Medicine celebrates 60 years of research
The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) has issued a special supplement commemorating six decades of leadership in the field of nuclear medicine, molecular imaging and therapy. The supplement features a collection of the most influential and frequently cited manuscripts in JNM's history, representing seminal discoveries and scientific contributions that shaped the future of medicine. Invited perspectives from world leaders in nuclear medicine, molecular imaging, and theranostics explain why each of these articles had such an enormous impact. (2020-12-10)

Computational method provides faster high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging
Researchers at the Beckman Institute have developed a computational strategy that enables faster chemical and spatial characterization of tissues. (2020-12-10)

One for all
AI-based evaluation of medical imaging data usually requires a specially developed algorithm for each task. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now presented a new method for configuring self-learning algorithms for a large number of different imaging datasets - without the need for specialist knowledge or very significant computing power. (2020-12-07)

New method uses artificial intelligence to study live cells
A new study combines label-free imaging with artificial intelligence to study unlabeled live cells. This method has promising applications for samples that need to be observed over long periods without the use of labels. (2020-12-07)

Adaptive Image Receive (AIR) coil from GE shows promise for whole-brain imaging
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), a prototype 16-channel head Adaptive Image Receive (AIR) radiofrequency coil from GE Healthcare outperformed a conventional 8-channel head coil for in vivo whole-brain imaging, though it did not perform as well as a conventional 32-channel head coil. (2020-12-03)

Post-COVID pain or weakness? Request an ultrasound or MRI
A new Northwestern Medicine study shows how advanced imaging technology can pinpoint what may have caused patients' nerve damage and help determine the best course of treatment. (2020-12-01)

Multi-center, multi-tracer PET studies harmonized to detect neuroinflammation in ALS
A novel ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) study has pooled data from multiple sites to effectively visualize neuroinflammation, which is key to developing drugs to treat the disease. Pooling data acquired from different scanners, different neuroinflammation positron emission tomography (PET) markers and different sites enhanced researchers' ability to detect neuroinflammation in ALS patients. This research was published in the November issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-12-01)

Holographic fluorescence imaging
A study in Science Advances by ICFO researchers, in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital, reports on a novel fluorescence holographic technique for the fast tracking of the 3D motion in cells. (2020-11-30)

Raman holography
Scientists from ICFO and University Rovira i Virgili report on a novel Raman holographic technique capable of tracking individual particles in 3D volumes from one single image. (2020-11-30)

Researchers develop low-cost, portable brain imaging scanner
Investigators have developed and tested a low-cost, compact, portable and low-power ''head only'' MRI scanner for brain tests. The scanner could allow for bedside brain imaging for patients or scanning in remote locations. (2020-11-24)

Team uses copper to image Alzheimer's aggregates in the brain
A proof-of-concept study conducted in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease offers new evidence that copper isotopes can be used to detect the amyloid-beta protein deposits that form in the brains of people living with -- or at risk of developing -- Alzheimer's. (2020-11-24)

Recording the symphony of cellular signals that drive biology
Like a computer, cells must process information from the outside world before they respond. Scientists have now developed a powerful new way to observe the internal discussions responsible for cellular decisions. (2020-11-23)

Food, housing insecurities may delay breast cancer diagnosis
Women who experience food or housing insecurity may be at risk for undiagnosed breast cancer due to lapses in follow-up appointments, according to research being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). (2020-11-19)

RIT students discover hidden 15th-century text on medieval manuscripts
Rochester Institute of Technology students discovered lost text on 15th-century manuscript leaves using an imaging system they developed as freshmen. By using ultraviolet-fluorescence imaging, the students revealed that a manuscript leaf held in RIT's Cary Graphic Arts Collection was actually a palimpsest, a manuscript on parchment with multiple layers of writing. (2020-11-19)

Mediastinal tuberculoma mimicking malignant cardiac tumor
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0587, Yiqian Ding, Wei Li, Yanqiu Liu, Min Ye, Liangping Cheng, Donghong Liu, Hong Lin and Fengjuan Yao from The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China consider mediastinal tuberculoma mimicking malignant cardiac tumors. (2020-11-19)

New technology allows more precise view of the smallest nanoparticles
Scientists have reported a new optical imaging technology, using a glass side covered with gold nanodiscs that allows them to monitor changes in the transmission of light and determine the characteristics of nanoparticles as small as 25 nanometers in diameter. (2020-11-16)

Are diagnostic imaging studies with positive conclusions or titles published faster?
According to the American Journal of Roentgenology, positive conclusions--but not titles--were associated with a shorter time from study completion to publication, which may contribute to an overrepresentation of positive results in the imaging diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) literature. Because an inflated perception of test performance could adversely influence clinical decision making and patient care, bias reduction strategies should undergo trials by both journal editors and researchers in the imaging DTA community. (2020-11-13)

Ultracompact metalens microscopy breaks FOV constraints
As reported in Advanced Photonics, their metalens-integrated imaging device (MIID) exhibits an ultracompact architecture with a working imaging distance in the hundreds of micrometers. Using a simple image-stitching process, they are able to obtain wide-field microscope imaging with large FOV and high resolution. (2020-11-13)

A survey on artificial intelligence in chest imaging of COVID-19
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors consider the application of artificial intelligence imaging analysis methods for COVID-19 clinical diagnosis. (2020-11-11)

Luddy researchers develop framework to study brain connectivity in living organisms
A new study by IU researchers lays out a large medical analytics framework that can be used in neuroscience and neurology to study brain connectivity in living organisms. (2020-11-11)

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