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Current Plastic Surgery News and Events, Plastic Surgery News Articles.
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Weight-reduction surgery for severely obese adults may prevent second heart attack, death
Adults with severe obesity (BMI >35) and a prior heart attack who undergo weight-reduction surgery may lower their risk of a second heart attack, major cardiovascular event, heart failure and death. (2020-10-26)
Improved survival after obesity operation in patients with previous myocardial infarction
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Danderyd Hospital in Sweden have studied the risk of additional myocardial infarctions and early death in severely obese patients who undergo metabolic surgery following a myocardial event. (2020-10-26)
Mythbusting: 5 common misperceptions surrounding the environmental impacts of single-use plastics
Stand in the soda pop aisle at the supermarket, surrounded by rows of brightly colored plastic bottles and metal cans, and it's easy to conclude that the main environmental problem here is an overabundance of single-use containers: If we simply recycled more of them, we'd go a long way toward minimizing impacts. (2020-10-26)
Microplastics in groundwater (and our drinking water) present unknown risk
Microplastics (plastics <5mm) and their negative health impacts have been studied in oceans, rivers, and even soils, and scientists are beginning to grapple with the myriad human health impacts their presence might have. (2020-10-26)
War on plastic is distracting from more urgent threats to environment, experts warn
A team of leading environmental experts, spearheaded by the University of Nottingham, have warned that the current war on plastic is detracting from the bigger threats to the environment. (2020-10-23)
Bioplastics no safer than other plastics
Bioplastics contain substances that are as toxic as those in ordinary plastics. (2020-10-23)
Axillary surgery may not be necessary for all women with invasive breast cancer
More women could potentially be spared an axillary lymph node dissection -- the surgical removal of 10-20 lymph nodes -- a procedure that causes disabling arm swelling in up to 25% of women, according to a UCLA study. (2020-10-22)
Nasal septum surgery can affect behaviour, say medics from RUDN University
A team of medics from RUDN University conducted an experiment on rats and confirmed that surgeries in the nasal cavity can cause behavioral changes, namely, make the animals timider. (2020-10-22)
Closing the plastic loop
Researchers develop a one-pot, low temperature catalytic method to turn polyethylene polymers into alkylaromatic molecules. (2020-10-22)
New method for upcycling polyethylene creates value from plastic waste
Using a unique catalyst to molecularly deconstruct polyethylene, the most commonly used form of plastic, researchers present a solvent-free way to transform it into higher-value, widely used chemical compounds. (2020-10-22)
Critically ill infants given blood transfusions before surgery have poorer outcomes
Critically ill newborns who receive blood transfusions prior to surgery had about a 50% increased rate of complications or death than those who did not receive transfusions, according to a new study published today in Pediatrics by Nemours Children's Health System researchers. (2020-10-21)
The highest heat-resistant plastic ever is developed from biomass
The use of biomass-derived plastics is one of the prime concerns to establish a sustainable society, which is incorporated as one of the Sustainable Development Goals. (2020-10-21)
High levels of microplastics released from infant feeding bottles during formula prep
New research shows that high levels of microplastics (MPs) are released from infant-feeding bottles (IFBs) during formula preparation. (2020-10-19)
An ultrasonic projector for medicine
A chip-based technology that modulates intensive sound pressure profiles with high resolution opens up new possibilities for ultrasound therapy. (2020-10-19)
NUS study reveals severe air pollution drives food delivery consumption and plastic waste
When the air outside is bad, office workers are more likely to order food delivery than go out for lunch, which in turn increases plastic waste from food packaging, according to a study by researchers from the National University of Singapore. (2020-10-19)
Does science have a plastic problem? Microbiologists take steps to reducing plastic waste
A research group based at the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute, developed an approach to reduce plastic waste produced by their lab. (2020-10-15)
Study confirms plastics threat to south pacific seabirds
Plastic gathered from remote corners of the South Pacific Ocean, including nesting areas of New Zealand albatrosses, has confirmed the global threat of plastic pollution to seabirds. (2020-10-14)
NTU scientists report plastic could be 'eco-friendlier' than paper &cotton in Singapore
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have modelled the cradle-to-grave environmental impact of using different types of shopping bags and report that in cities like Singapore, single-use plastic bags (made from high-density polyethylene plastic) have a lower environmental footprint than single-use paper and multi-use cotton bags. (2020-10-14)
Glitter litter could be damaging rivers - study
New research indicates that glitter could be causing ecological damage to our rivers and lakes. (2020-10-14)
Higher average life expectancy after obesity surgery
People who have undergone obesity (bariatric) surgery live three years longer, on average, than those given conventional treatment for their obesity, a University of Gothenburg study shows. (2020-10-14)
Study first to tally biomass from oceanic plastic debris using visualization method
Scientists examined cell abundances, size, cellular carbon mass, and how photosynthetic cells differ on polymeric and glass substrates over time, exploring nanoparticle generation from plastic like polystyrene and how this might disrupt microalgae. (2020-10-13)
Casting call: why immobilizing helps in healing
DALLAS - Oct. 12, 2020 - By far, the most common injuries seen in emergency rooms in the United States are those affecting extremities. (2020-10-12)
Female surgeons perform less complex cases than male peers, likely due to systemic bias
Female surgeons at a large academic medical center perform less complex surgical procedures than their male counterparts, according to a new study. (2020-10-09)
Does general anesthesia increase dementia risk?
There are concerns that exposure to general anesthesia during surgery may contribute to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. (2020-10-07)
Stopping opioid-related addiction, harm and accidents after surgery
An international group of global experts including anaesthetists, surgeons and other healthcare professionals have come together to publish a consensus statement on the prevention of opioid-related harm in adult surgical patients. (2020-10-07)
NREL, UK university partner to dive deeper into how enzymes digest plastic
A collaboration between scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the University of Portsmouth in the United Kingdom, and other partners has yielded further insight into the workings of plastic-eating enzymes. (2020-10-06)
The best of both worlds: A new take on metal-plastic hybrid 3D printing
Current 3D printers employ either plastic or metal only, and the conventional method to coat 3D plastic structures with metal is not environment-friendly and yields poor results. (2020-10-05)
Benefits, risks seen with antibiotics-first for appendicitis
Antibiotics are a good choice for some patients with appendicitis but not all, according to study results published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. (2020-10-05)
Acupuncture before surgery means less pain, significantly fewer opioids for Veterans
Veterans who have acupuncture before surgery report less pain and need far fewer opioids to manage their discomfort, according to a randomized, controlled study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-05)
Cannabis use prompts need for more anesthesia during surgery, increases pain
Not only might cannabis users require more anesthesia during surgery than non-users, they may have increased pain afterwards and use higher doses of opioids while in the hospital, suggests first-of-its kind research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-05)
Research shows benefits/risks of treating appendicitis with antibiotics instead of surgery
NEJM: Results of a first-of-its-kind clinical trial shed light on when antibiotics instead of surgery might be the better choice for treating appendicitis in some patients, according to researchers with UTHealth, who led the Houston trial sites. (2020-10-05)
Pancreatic surgery: lower mortality with larger case volumes
Pancreatic surgery: lower mortality with larger case volumes The survival probabilities are higher in hospitals where complex pancreatic surgery is performed more frequently. (2020-10-05)
AI predicts patients at highest risk for severe pain, increased opioid use post-surgery
Artificial intelligence (AI) used in machine learning models can predict which patients are at highest risk for severe pain after surgery, and help determine who would most benefit from personalized pain management plans that use non-opioid alternatives, suggests new research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-04)
Black children more than twice as likely to die after surgical complications
When it comes to surgery, minority children lag far behind white children, according to two analyses of large national databases being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-03)
Treating DCIS with surgery and radiotherapy lowers cancer risk but benefits drop over time
A major study of women with DCIS - a breast condition that can become invasive cancer - has shown that surgery to remove the tissue followed by radiotherapy offers better protection compared to surgery alone. (2020-10-03)
Surgery for benign breast disease does not impair future breastfeeding capability
Young women with benign breast conditions may undergo surgery without jeopardizing their ability to breastfeed later on. (2020-10-03)
Study shows need for balance in post-surgery opioid prescribing guidelines
Opioid guidelines may be missing a small group of patients that need a greater level of pain control. (2020-10-03)
Program to improve outcomes for geriatric surgery patients shows promise
A beta test of a program for older adults who undergo major surgery has resulted in shorter hospital stays and lower rates of post-surgery delirium, among other improved outcomes. (2020-10-03)
New research on cataract surgery in order to improve health care
In general, surgeons who perform numerous cataract operations every year encounter relatively few severe cases, and this probably contributes to their lower complication rate, as shown by a study led from the University of Gothenburg. (2020-10-02)
Wasp egg-laying organ inspires new tool to reduce trauma in minimally invasive surgery
A new surgery tool based on the egg-laying organ of parasitic wasps could advance minimally invasive surgery by enabling tissue removal in deeper areas of the body while further minimising trauma and patient recovery time. (2020-09-30)
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