Current Deaf News and Events

Current Deaf News and Events, Deaf News Articles.
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How the brain processes sign language
Over 70 million deaf people use sign languages as their preferred communication form. Although they access similar brain structures as spoken languages, it hasn't been identified the brain regions that process both forms of language equally. MPI CBS has now discovered that Broca's area in the left hemisphere, central for spoken languages, is also crucial for sign languages. This is where the grammar and meaning are processed, regardless of whether it is spoken or signed language. (2021-02-19)

Study suggests sounds influence the developing brain earlier than previously thought
In experiments in newborn mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins report that sounds appear to change ''wiring'' patterns in areas of the brain that process sound earlier than scientists assumed and even before the ear canal opens. (2021-02-12)

SoundWatch: New smartwatch app alerts d/Deaf and hard-of-hearing users to birdsong, sirens and other desired sounds
University of Washington researchers have developed SoundWatch, a smartwatch app for deaf, Deaf and hard-of-hearing people who want to be aware of nearby sounds. (2020-10-28)

How Steak-umm became a social media phenomenon during the pandemic
A new study outlines how a brand of frozen meat products took social media by storm - and what other brands can learn from the phenomenon. (2020-10-01)

New education 'hubs' for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close
New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said. (2020-09-24)

RIT/NTID researchers study how deaf and hearing people watch sign language
A recent study has shown that readers' eye gaze behaviors are strong indicators of words that are unexpected, new, or difficult to understand. The study by Rain Bosworth, an assistant professor and researcher in the Center for Sensory, Perceptual, and Cognitive Ecology (SPaCE Center) at Rochester Institute of Technology's National Technical Institute for the Deaf, explores the unknown qualities of gaze behavior for 'sign watching' and how these are affected by a user's language expertise and intelligibility of the sign input. (2020-09-09)

Wireless, optical cochlear implant uses LED lights to restore hearing in rodents
Scientists have created an optical cochlear implant based on LED lights that can safely and partially restore the sensation of hearing in deaf rats and gerbils. (2020-07-22)

Improved cochlear implant device allows safe MRI in children without discomfort
A study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that children with a MED-EL Synchrony cochlear implant device can undergo MRI safely, with no discomfort and reduced need for sedation or anesthesia. Findings were published in the peer-reviewed journal Laryngoscope. (2020-07-09)

Wearable-tech glove translates sign language into speech in real time
UCLA bioengineers have designed a glove-like device that can translate American Sign Language into English speech in real time though a smartphone app. Their research is published in the journal Nature Electronics. The system includes a pair of gloves with thin, stretchable sensors that run the length of each of the five fingers. These sensors, made from electrically conducting yarns, pick up hand motions and finger placements that stand for individual letters, numbers, words and phrases. (2020-06-29)

Similar brain glitch found in slips of signing, speaking
The discovery of a common neural mechanism in speech and ASL errors -- one that occurs in just 40 milliseconds -- could improve recovery in deaf signers after a stroke. (2020-05-04)

Deaf moths evolved noise-cancelling scales to evade prey
Some species of deaf moths can absorb as much as 85 per cent of the incoming sound energy from predatory bats -- who use echolocation to detect them. The findings, published in Royal Society Interface today, reveal the moths, who are unable to hear the ultrasonic calls of bats, have evolved this clever defensive strategy to help it survive. (2020-02-25)

Traces of the European enlightenment found in the DNA of western sign languages
Sign languages throughout North and South America and Europe have centuries-long roots in five European locations, a finding that gives new insight into the influence of the European Enlightenment on many of the world's signing communities and the evolution of their languages. (2020-01-22)

How does language emerge?
How did the almost 6000 languages of the world come into being? Researchers from the Leipzig Research Centre for Early Childhood Development at Leipzig University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have tried to simulate the process of developing a new communication system in an experiment - with surprising results: even preschool children can spontaneously develop communication systems that exhibit core properties of natural language. (2019-12-03)

Inter faculty -- Journal of Interdisciplinary Research in Human and Social Sciences, Vol.9
Volume 9 of Inter Faculty takes up the theme of patterns of confluence and influence in the context of the movements of history. (2019-11-29)

DDT linked to higher risk of diabetes among Asian Indian immigrants to US
Previous exposure to the pollutant DDT may contribute to the risk of diabetes among Asian Indian immigrants to the United States, according to a UC Davis study. (2019-11-20)

Deaf infants' gaze behavior more advanced than that of hearing infants
Deaf infants who have been exposed to American Sign Language are better at following an adult's gaze than their hearing peers, supporting the idea that social-cognitive development is sensitive to different kinds of life experiences. (2019-10-16)

Study 'cures' oldest case of deafness in human evolution
An international team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has published a new study examining a 430,000-year-old cranium of a human ancestor that was previously described as deaf, representing the oldest case of deafness in human prehistory. (2019-10-15)

Deaf infants more attuned to parent's visual cues
A University of Washington-led study finds that Deaf infants exposed to American Sign Language are especially tuned to a parent's eye gaze, itself a social connection between parent and child that is linked to early learning. (2019-10-15)

To become, or not to become... a neuron
Researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen and Jérôme Bonnefont (VIB-KU Leuven and ULB) have unraveled a new mechanism controlling the switch between growth and differentiation of neural stem cells during brain development. They discovered a specific factor that makes stem cells 'deaf' to proliferative signals, which in turn causes them to differentiate into neurons and shape the marvelous complexity of our brain. (2019-07-25)

The UC3M programs a humanoid robot to communicate in sign language
Scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have published a paper featuring the results of research into interactions between robots and deaf people, in which they were able to programme a humanoid - called TEO - to communicate in sign language. (2019-07-08)

Study: Poor women are more hopeful than poor men
The researchers concluded that even when men are poor and unemployed, their recognition and role is tied to work, money, and markets. Women, however, have more means to attain a sense of worth outside the economic realm. (2019-07-08)

Hearing loss before 50 may mean higher risk of drug and alcohol issues
People under age 50 with hearing loss misuse prescription opioids at twice the rate of their hearing peers, and are also more likely to misuse alcohol and other drugs, a new national study finds. This means that health care providers may need to take special care when treating pain and mental health conditions in deaf and hard-of-hearing young adults, the researchers say. (2019-03-25)

Kids with cochlear implants since infancy more likely to speak, not sign
Researchers from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago present further evidence that deaf children who received cochlear implants (implanted electronic hearing device) before 12 months of age learn to more rapidly understand spoken language and are more likely to develop spoken language as their exclusive form of communication. (2019-03-05)

Gene therapy durably reverses congenital deafness in mice
Scientists have managed to restore hearing in an adult mouse model of DFNB9 deafness -- a hearing disorder that represents one of the most frequent cases of congenital genetic deafness. Individuals with DFNB9 deafness are profoundly deaf as they are deficient in the gene coding for otoferlin, a protein which is essential for transmitting sound information at the auditory sensory cell synapses. (2019-02-19)

Deaf moth evolves sound-production as a warning to outwit its predator
A genus of deaf moth has evolved to develop an extraordinary sound-producing structure in its wings to evade its primary predator the bat. The finding, made by researchers from the University of Bristol and Natural History Museum, is described in Scientific Reports today. (2019-02-05)

The vibrating universe: Making astronomy accessible to the deaf
Astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, have teamed with teachers at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside, or CSDR, to design an astronomy workshop for students with hearing loss that can be easily used in classrooms, museums, fairs, and other public events. The workshop utilized a sound stage that allowed the CSDR students to 'feel' vibrations from rockets, stars, galaxies, supernovae, and even remnants of the Big Bang itself. (2019-02-05)

New mutations causing inherited deaf-blindness have been discovered
A team of scientists from Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) together with their colleagues from leading scientific centers of Moscow and India described a number of genetic mutations causing Usher syndrome (inherited deaf-blindness). They found previously unstudied unique mutations in investigated DNA regions. The results of the study were published in the Ophthalmic Genetics journal. (2019-01-22)

Sign language reveals the hidden logical structure, and limitations, of spoken language
Sign languages can help reveal hidden aspects of the logical structure of spoken language, but they also highlight its limitations because speech lacks the rich iconic resources that sign language uses on top of its sophisticated grammar. (2018-11-06)

Moths survive bat predation through acoustic camouflage fur
Moths are a mainstay food source for bats, which use echolocation to hunt their prey. Scientists are studying how moths have evolved passive defenses over millions of years to resist their primary predators. While some moths have evolved ears that detect the ultrasonic calls of bats, many types of moths remain deaf. In those moths, researchers have found that the insects developed types of 'stealth coating' that serve as acoustic camouflage to evade hungry bats. (2018-11-06)

Hearing class
New study finds that the class of neurons responsible for transmitting information from the inner ear to the brain is composed of three molecularly distinct subtypes. One of these subtypes is selectively lost in the inner ears of aging mice, and this molecular diversity does not emerge properly in a deaf-mouse model. (2018-08-02)

American sign language and English language learners: New linguistic research supports the need for policy changes
A new study of the educational needs of students who are native users of American Sign Language (ASL) shows glaring disparities in their treatment by the U.S Department of Education. The article, (2018-06-11)

Synchronizing cochlear signals stimulates brain to 'hear' in stereo
Using both ears to hear increases speech recognition and improves sound localization. Ruth Litovsky, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, wants to bring this advantage to people who use cochlear implants. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Litovsky will present data showing a new technique that synchronizes the cochlear signals that stimulate the brain in a way that is similar to people who can hear normally. (2018-05-08)

When we sign, we build phrases with similar neural mechanisms as when we speak
Differences between signed and spoken languages are significant, yet the underlying neural processes we use to create complex expressions are quite similar for both, a team of researchers has found. (2018-04-03)

Reorganization of brain outputs in deaf cats
Cats deaf from an early age have increased outgoing connections from the auditory cortex to a midbrain region responsible for directing the animal to a particular location in its environment. The study, published in JNeurosci, is the first to examine the reorganization of outputs from the sensory cortex following hearing loss. (2018-04-02)

Is hearing loss associated with increased risk of accidental injury?
Difficulty hearing was associated with increased risk of accidental injury and individuals reporting 'a lot of trouble' hearing were twice as likely to be hurt. (2018-03-22)

Deaf children learn words faster than hearing children
Each year many deaf children get a cochlear implant to connect to the world of sounds. So far, it was not clear which processes take place in these children when they start to learn language - and why they differ in the level of language they achieve. Now, the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences found that deaf children with a cochlear implant learn words even faster than those with normal hearing. (2018-01-23)

CRISPR therapy preserves hearing in progressive deafness model
Researchers have developed a CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing therapy to prevent hearing loss in a mouse model of human genetic progressive deafness. (2017-12-20)

Considerable gap exists in US between having hearing loss and receiving medical evaluation treatment
Nearly a third of about 40 million adults in the United States who report hearing difficulties have not seen a specialist for their hearing problems. (2017-11-22)

Older Neandertal survived with a little help from his friends
An older Neandertal from about 50,000 years ago, who had suffered multiple injuries and other degenerations, became deaf and must have relied on the help of others to avoid prey and survive well into his 40s, indicates a new analysis published Oct. 20 in the online journal PLoS ONE. (2017-10-23)

Paper: Don't rely on mixed messages to change health behaviors
Self-improvement messages to lose weight, quit smoking or eat more fruits and vegetables can fall on deaf ears if the intervention message is mixed, says new research from U. of I. psychology professor Dolores Albarracin. (2017-09-28)

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